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Does Loneliness Contribute to Morbidity and Mortality?

March 24, 2017
Does Loneliness Contribute to Morbidity and Mortality?

By Katherine Otto

Peer Reviewed

What medications do you currently take? Do you have any allergies? What medical conditions did your parents live with, or die from?

As physicians in training, we are conditioned to drill every patient with a standard list of questions whose answers could literally save a life. We investigate for drug toxicities, medication interactions, daily exposures, and family histories that shed light onto present illness.

Within our standard interview we also check off mandatory boxes to describe a patient’s “Social History”—Do …

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Primecuts – This Week in the Journals

March 20, 2017
Primecuts – This Week in the Journals

By Katharine Lawrence, MD

Peer Reviewed

Last week, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) announced that the cap on residents’ duty hours would be adjusted to include 28 hour shifts for first-year residents. This is a shift from the 2011 ‘duty hours’ requirements, which limited maximum shift duration for interns to 16 hours.

In a statement on the Common Program Requirements, the ACGME announced “that the hypothesized benefits associated with the have not been realized, and the disruption of team-based care …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

February 6, 2017
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Carolyn B. Drake, MD, MPH

Peer Reviewed

News:

In the fortnight since Donald Trump was inaugurated as the 45th president of the United States, we’ve seen a flurry of political activity as the new president seeks to make good on his promises from the campaign trail. From the headlines, these actions include: a number of executive orders signed, a controversial refugee ban enacted with widespread protests in its wake, the release of initial plans to build a wall along the border between Mexico and …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

January 17, 2017
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Scott Butler, MD 

Peer Reviewed

A presidential goodbye. A contentious press conference.  A salacious dossier from a British spy.  It’s been quite a week.

As Republican legislators transition from symbolically voting to repeal Obamacare (over 50 times since its inception) to making its dissolution a reality, it becomes increasingly clear that “replace” is the much more challenging half of the promise to “repeal and replace” the law. Theodore Roosevelt backed a plan for universal coverage when he sought an elusive third term in 1912.  …

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From The Archives – Fractional Excretion of Sodium (FENa): Diagnostic Godsend or Gimmick?

July 22, 2016
From The Archives – Fractional Excretion of Sodium (FENa): Diagnostic Godsend or Gimmick?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated September 5, 2012

By Jon-Emile S Kenny, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A 62- year-old man with a history of hypertension, diastolic dysfunction and chronic kidney disease is admitted 4 days after beginning outpatient treatment of community acquired pneumonia with cefpodoxime and azithromycin; he had been intermittently vomiting for two days, but proudly states that he has been keeping all of his home medications down, including hydrochlorothiazide. The morning after his admission, he was noted to have a …

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Gun Violence: A Public Health Concern?

June 9, 2016
Gun Violence: A Public Health Concern?

By Matthew B. McNeill, MD

Peer Reviewed

One can often feel numb or indifferent to the seemingly nightly reports of gun deaths on American news programs. Individual homicides, suicides, or accidental gun deaths are tragic and tragically commonplace. However, over the last two decades, a tide of unrest with the current role of guns in America has arisen in the wake of mass school shootings in places such as Jonesboro, AR (1998, 5 killed, 10 injured), Columbine, CO (1999, 13 killed, 24 injured), Red Lake …

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By Any Other Name

May 4, 2016
By Any Other Name

By Kathy May Tran

Peer Reviewed

Six weeks ago, Mr. S had fever, chills, cough, and rhinorrhea, which ultimately self-resolved. Two weeks later, he noticed right-sided neck pain that radiated towards his ear. When the pain progressively worsened, he presented to the emergency department. On physical exam, Mr. S was febrile to 100.5°F, tachycardic, diaphoretic, and in obvious pain. His right neck was swollen, erythematous, and tender to palpation. Laboratory results were significant for a white blood cell (WBC) count of 19.5 x 103/uL with …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

April 12, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Neha Jindal, MD

Peer Reviewed

Pharmaceutical companies made headlines last week when the $150 billion Pfizer-Allergan merger was called off shortly after the Obama administration issued new rules designed to crack down on corporate tax avoidance.  This comes on the heels of reports that major drug companies have set significantly higher prices on medications in the last five years.  According to a Reuters analysis, four of the top ten prescribed drugs in the United States had a price increase of over 100% since 2011.  …

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From The Archives – Gout: A Disease of the Blessed or a Blessing in Disguise?

April 7, 2016
From The Archives – Gout: A Disease of the Blessed or a Blessing in Disguise?

Please enjoy this article From The Archives dated June 8, 2012

By Krithiga Sekar

Faculty Peer Reviewed

“The patient goes to bed and sleeps quietly until about two in the morning when he is awakened by a pain which usually seizes the great toe, but sometimes the heel, the calf of the leg or the ankle… so exquisitely painful as not to endure the weight of the clothes nor the shaking of the room from a person walking briskly therein.”

—Thomas Sydenham  (1683)

Gout, an …

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Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

March 15, 2016
Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

By Jafar Al-Mondhiry, MD MA

This week saw the passing of former first lady Nancy Reagan, a national icon during and after her time, and a pioneer of many social and health-related movements.  Her “Just Say No” campaign became an international catch phrase, something featured in newspapers, magazines, TV commercials, and even music videos . Even while the nation struggles more than ever with drug abuse and new ways to address it – now with drug overdose eclipsing car accidents as the leading cause of …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

February 29, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Monil Shah, MD

Peer Reviewed

Last week Virgin Galactic, a spaceflight company that aims to bring space tourism to reality, unveiled a new spaceship at the Mojave Air and Space Port in California. The new spaceship has been named Virgin Spaceship (VSS) Unity by Professor Stephen Hawking . VSS Unity is still undergoing preliminary test flights. A seat with VSS Unity will cost around US $250,000. On an interesting note, the world’s first space tourist was an American business man and former NASA engineer …

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Myth or Reality: Are Shellfish Allergies Related to Contrast Reactions?

January 13, 2016
Myth or Reality: Are Shellfish Allergies Related to Contrast Reactions?

By Ian Fagan, MD

Peer Reviewed

I was recently vacationing on a cruise ship. As anybody who regularly cruises most certainly knows, you make your money back not in the casino, but rather on lobster night—a meal consisting of endless portions of delicious, succulent lobster tail.

A table mate of mine did not order the lobster. When asked why, she shared an interesting tale: After 40 years of eating shellfish as she pleased, she was found to be “allergic to iodine” and was subsequently warned …

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