Neuro

Dix-Hallpike Positive, No Red Flags, Now What?

January 23, 2010
Dix-Hallpike Positive, No Red Flags, Now What?

The Proper Diagnosis and Treatment of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

Carly Oboudiyat

Faculty peer reviewed

You finally have the “dizzy” patient whose eyes actually beat torsionally upwards when you do that silly maneuver you have done countless times to no avail. Hallelujah, you think, a positive Dix-Hallpike sign, reassuring you that you have a case of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). But now what? Do you try that other acrobatic maneuver to reposition the canaliths in the…

Read more »

Myths and Realities: Cell phones and the risk of brain cancer

November 27, 2009
Myths and Realities: Cell phones and the risk of brain cancer

Daria B. Crittenden

Although children today have never known a world without cell phones, the rest of us remember when these devices were created and have watched their popularity soar. The ability to have constant communication, anytime and anywhere, is now taken for granted. Many have asked the question, are we putting our health at risk with this technology? Specifically, with cell phones cradled against our ears many times a day, and sometimes for many hours a day, are we at…

Read more »

Sleep, Memory, and Medical Students

October 2, 2009
Sleep, Memory, and Medical Students

Megan Mulligan

Faculty peer reviewed by Dr. David Rapoport

The role of sleep in memory formation is an intriguing topic that has garnered widespread interest among researchers in recent years. The subject has seen a doubling in the number of publications every decade, yet the mechanism by which memories are formed remains elusive. There is little debate that sleep is important for memory, which begs the question: What does the role of sleep in memory imply for the infamously…

Read more »

Class Act: AGE-RAGE: What we know about the pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy.

December 26, 2008
Class Act: AGE-RAGE: What we know about the pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy.

Commentary by Regina Mysliwiec, NYU Medical Student

Faculty Peer Reviewed

G.L. is a 62 year-old African-American male with a six year history of Type 2 Diabetes with variable glucose control and a progressive one year history of burning pain in a unilateral T10 distribution. The pain began at his right abdomen, then spread first to his umbilicus and finally ventrodorsally to his spine. His most recent HgbA1c is 8.0.

One does not have to be a medical student in New York…

Read more »

Bell’s Palsy 2.0—Crocodile Dundee Tears

March 5, 2008
Bell’s Palsy 2.0—Crocodile Dundee Tears

Diseases 2.0 – Bringing you the latest updates on disease pathophysiology and treatment

Commentary by Aaron Lord MD, PGY-1

A 39 year-old woman awakes one morning and notices that the left side of her face is droopy. While at work, she has trouble controlling her saliva and it dribbles down the left side of her chin. At dinner, she has trouble eating and notices food stuck between her lips and teeth on the left side. The next morning she sees her primary…

Read more »

Bedside Rounds: How Do You Diagnose and Treat Diabetic Neuropathy

October 3, 2007
Bedside Rounds: How Do You Diagnose and Treat Diabetic Neuropathy

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

Diabetic neuropathy is one of the most commonly encountered complications of diabetes mellitus. It is seen in up to 20% of diabetics. Patients typically present with neuropathic pain in a “glove and stocking” distribution with the earliest signs in the feet. Night time complaints of “my feet are on fire” are common. Relying on a patient’s complaint of “pain” or “numbness” is inadequate in the diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy since…

Read more »

An Update on Multiple Sclerosis

August 21, 2007
An Update on Multiple Sclerosis

Commentary by Jacqueline Friedman, MD, Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology,  Director, New York Region Veterans Administration Multiple Sclerosis Center of Excellence

Multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic disease of the central nervous system, is thought to be initiated by an inflammatory phase followed by degeneration of both white and grey matter. While there is no cure, great strides have been made in the past ten years—we now believe that the earlier a diagnosis is suspected and treatment is initiated, the better the long-term course…

Read more »

Class Act: Is there evidence to support chiropractic care of low back pain?

July 18, 2007
Class Act: Is there evidence to support chiropractic care of low back pain?

Welcome to Class Act, a new feature of Clinical Correlations. Class act will feature posts written by NYU 3rd and 4th year medical students. These posts will focus on evidenced based answers to clinical questions related to patients seen by our students in the clinics or on the wards. Prior to publication, each commentary is thoroughly reviewed for content by a faculty member. Enjoy…

Commentary by Brian Liem, MSIV

A 52 year old male with no medical problems presents to your clinic with a…

Read more »

New Guidelines on the Management of Intracerebral Hemorrhage

May 30, 2007
New Guidelines on the Management of Intracerebral Hemorrhage

Commentary by Dr. Daniel Labovitz, Director of the NYU Stroke Center

After an 8-year hiatus, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association has at last published a fresh set of guidelines on the management of acute spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) . ICH represents between 10 and 20% of all first strokes, depending on the population, but carries a mortality rate of 35% to 50%, with hemorrhage volume, hemorrhage location, intraventricular extension and age all contributing independently to the risk of death.…

Read more »

How Do You Estimate Stroke Risk After a Transient Ischemic Attack?

April 24, 2007
How Do You Estimate Stroke Risk After a Transient Ischemic Attack?

By: Alana Choy-Shan, MD PGY-3
Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) are known to be a harbinger of stroke, however it is difficult for physicians to estimate individual stroke risk. Previously, the two systems used to predict short-term risk of stroke after a TIA were the California and ABCD scores. Both scores are based on clinical factors with several key elements in common. However, neither scoring system was devised to predict stroke within 48 hours of TIA, a time period which may be most clinically relevant.…

Read more »

Quick Thinking Part 4-The Conclusion

April 20, 2007
Quick Thinking Part 4-The Conclusion

Welcome to Quick Thinking. A case is presented in short sections to a faculty expert who will comment on their approach to the patient as the case unfolds. These posts will focus on determining the initial differential diagnoses and diagnostic workups of complicated patient presentations.

Part 1 can be found here.  Part 2 can be found here.  Part 3 can be found here.

Part 3 Case Presentation by Elizabeth Ross, PGY-3:

The patient continued to complain of headache and dizziness and given the patient’s persistent and intermittent fevers…

Read more »

A New Take on Quitting Smoking…

January 26, 2007
A New Take on Quitting Smoking…

Landing on the front page of the New York Times today is a study from Science that may turn addiction medicine on its head…no pun intended.   Of 32 smokers who had suffered a brain injury, they found that 16 who had suffered damage to the insula were easily able to quit smoking almost fully disrupting their smoking behavior in comparison to the other 16 who had suffered damage elsewhere.  The insula is a region of the brain that has been previously implicated in…

Read more »