Neuro

Do I have a Concussion?

July 21, 2010
Do I have a Concussion?

By Radhika Sundararajan, M.D., Ph.D

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A healthy 18 year-old female presents to Urgent Care after slipping and falling this morning in the bathroom and hitting her head on the tile floor. She denies any loss of consciousness, vomiting, or current neurological deficits, but does have a mild occipital headache where she struck her head. She has heard a lot about recent research regarding concussions in young athletes and asks if you think she suffered a concussion and what this means for her.…

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Marijuana and Multiple Sclerosis- Half-Baked? The Evidence Behind Cannabinoid Use for the Treatment of Pain and Spasticity in MS Patients

June 3, 2010
Marijuana and Multiple Sclerosis- Half-Baked? The Evidence Behind Cannabinoid Use for the Treatment of Pain and Spasticity in MS Patients

By Maura RZ Madou, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

When the New Jersey legislature approved a measure to legalize the use of marijuana for patients with chronic illnesses early this year, multiple sclerosis (MS) patient Charles Kwiatkowski, of Hazlet, N.J., rhetorically asked the New York Times; “The M.S. Society has shown that this drug will help slow the progression of my disease. Why would I want to use anything else?”1 New Jersey was the 14th state in the nation to approve such legislation. Does the drug …

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Alzheimer’s Disease 2.0

May 12, 2010
Alzheimer’s Disease 2.0

Jeffrey Mayne MD

Faculty peer reviewed

Dr. Okonkwo’s post this past summer to PrimeCuts summarized ongoing research in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia affecting 15 million individuals worldwide and more than 5 million in the United States. It is a disease marked by cognitive deterioration that slowly breaks down one’s ability to perform activities of daily living and leaves individuals unable to care for themselves.

Briefly, the diagnosis of AD is based on clinical criteria and histologic confirmation at death. Based …

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Alzheimer’s Disease 2.0

April 21, 2010
Alzheimer’s Disease 2.0

Jeffery Mayne MD

Faculty peer reviewed

Dr. Okonkwo’s post this past summer to PrimeCuts summarized ongoing research in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia affecting 15 million individuals worldwide and more than 5 million in the United States. It is a disease marked by cognitive deterioration that slowly breaks down one’s ability to perform activities of daily living and leaves individuals unable to care for themselves.

Briefly, the diagnosis of AD is based on clinical criteria and histologic confirmation at death. Based …

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When Minutes Matter: Why Do Patients Wait to Seek Treatment Following a Stroke or Heart Attack?

March 3, 2010
When Minutes Matter: Why Do Patients Wait to Seek Treatment Following a Stroke or Heart Attack?

Laurel Geraghty

Faculty peer reviewed

Both stroke and heart attack require rapid treatment following the onset of symptoms to minimize morbidity and mortality, but few patients seek help in a timely manner. Only about half of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or stroke arrive to the emergency department within four hours of the onset of symptoms.,,, Every 30-minute delay in treatment following AMI increases one-year mortality by 7.5%, and almost half of the 167,000 annual stroke deaths in this country occur before the patient …

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Dix-Hallpike Positive, No Red Flags, Now What?

January 23, 2010
Dix-Hallpike Positive, No Red Flags, Now What?

The Proper Diagnosis and Treatment of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

Carly Oboudiyat

Faculty peer reviewed

You finally have the “dizzy” patient whose eyes actually beat torsionally upwards when you do that silly maneuver you have done countless times to no avail. Hallelujah, you think, a positive Dix-Hallpike sign, reassuring you that you have a case of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). But now what? Do you try that other acrobatic maneuver to reposition the canaliths in the posterior canal, or should you give meclizine?

Benign …

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Myths and Realities: Cell phones and the risk of brain cancer

November 27, 2009
Myths and Realities: Cell phones and the risk of brain cancer

Daria B. Crittenden

Although children today have never known a world without cell phones, the rest of us remember when these devices were created and have watched their popularity soar. The ability to have constant communication, anytime and anywhere, is now taken for granted. Many have asked the question, are we putting our health at risk with this technology? Specifically, with cell phones cradled against our ears many times a day, and sometimes for many hours a day, are we at increased risk for developing …

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Sleep, Memory, and Medical Students

October 2, 2009
Sleep, Memory, and Medical Students

Megan Mulligan

Faculty peer reviewed by Dr. David Rapoport

The role of sleep in memory formation is an intriguing topic that has garnered widespread interest among researchers in recent years. The subject has seen a doubling in the number of publications every decade, yet the mechanism by which memories are formed remains elusive. There is little debate that sleep is important for memory, which begs the question: What does the role of sleep in memory imply for the infamously sleep-deprived medical trainee? This brief review …

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Class Act: AGE-RAGE: What we know about the pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy.

December 26, 2008
Class Act: AGE-RAGE: What we know about the pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy.

Commentary by Regina Mysliwiec, NYU Medical Student

Faculty Peer Reviewed

G.L. is a 62 year-old African-American male with a six year history of Type 2 Diabetes with variable glucose control and a progressive one year history of burning pain in a unilateral T10 distribution. The pain began at his right abdomen, then spread first to his umbilicus and finally ventrodorsally to his spine. His most recent HgbA1c is 8.0.

One does not have to be a medical student in New York City for very long …

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Bell’s Palsy 2.0—Crocodile Dundee Tears

March 5, 2008
Bell’s Palsy 2.0—Crocodile Dundee Tears

Diseases 2.0 – Bringing you the latest updates on disease pathophysiology and treatment

Commentary by Aaron Lord MD, PGY-1

A 39 year-old woman awakes one morning and notices that the left side of her face is droopy. While at work, she has trouble controlling her saliva and it dribbles down the left side of her chin. At dinner, she has trouble eating and notices food stuck between her lips and teeth on the left side. The next morning she sees her primary care physician with …

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Bedside Rounds: How Do You Diagnose and Treat Diabetic Neuropathy

October 3, 2007
Bedside Rounds: How Do You Diagnose and Treat Diabetic Neuropathy

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

Diabetic neuropathy is one of the most commonly encountered complications of diabetes mellitus. It is seen in up to 20% of diabetics. Patients typically present with neuropathic pain in a “glove and stocking” distribution with the earliest signs in the feet. Night time complaints of “my feet are on fire” are common. Relying on a patient’s complaint of “pain” or “numbness” is inadequate in the diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy since almost half …

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An Update on Multiple Sclerosis

August 21, 2007
An Update on Multiple Sclerosis

Commentary by Jacqueline Friedman, MD, Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology,  Director, New York Region Veterans Administration Multiple Sclerosis Center of Excellence

Multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic disease of the central nervous system, is thought to be initiated by an inflammatory phase followed by degeneration of both white and grey matter. While there is no cure, great strides have been made in the past ten years—we now believe that the earlier a diagnosis is suspected and treatment is initiated, the better the long-term course of the …

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