Heme/Onc

Core IM podcast: 5 Pearls on Iron Deficiency Anemia

November 15, 2017

Listen to 5 Pearls segment of Iron Deficiency Anemia! By Dr. Cary Blum MD, Marty Fried MD and Shreya P. Trivedi MD; Illustration by Mike Natter MD

Time Stamps:

  1.  Should patients be screened for iron deficiency? If so, who and how often? (1:40)
  2.  What are the indications for diagnostic endoscopy in iron deficient patients? (3:23)
  3. How should you advice patients to take oral iron? What is optimal dosing? (5:53)
  4.  In which patients would you consider IV iron? What are the risks? (11:41)
  5.  Throwback Question: What is a medication overuse HA? (14:44)

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Sex or Drugs: Why Do We See An Increased Incidence of Oropharyngeal Cancer?

July 13, 2016
Sex or Drugs: Why Do We See An Increased Incidence of Oropharyngeal Cancer?

By Tyler Litton, MD

Peer Reviewed

Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is relatively rare but incidence has increased in the US over the past 40 years. Tonsillar cancer is the most common type of OPSCC followed by base of tongue cancer, which together account for 90% of all OPSCCs. The incidence of both tonsillar and base of tongue cancers individually have also increased in the US. OPSCC is more common in men than women and smoking and alcohol are well known risk factors for …

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Shifting Paradigms in Cancer: Vaccines

January 22, 2015
Shifting Paradigms in Cancer: Vaccines

Joshua Horton

Peer Reviewed

We are not winning the war against cancer, if war is even an appropriate metaphor. When Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act into effect in 1971, many predicted that cancer would be a thing of the past within 5 years. It was likened to polio, smallpox, and other long-since-forgotten scourges of mankind; with appropriate funding and research, surely cancer, too, would vanish. With that act in 1971, the National Cancer Institute received a budget of $200 million, a figure that …

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Lung Cancer Screening with Low-Dose CT Scans

May 9, 2014
Lung Cancer Screening with Low-Dose CT Scans

By Susanna Jeurling

Peer Reviewed

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recently finalized its position regarding annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) scanning for early detection of lung cancer. The grade B recommendation states that individuals between the ages of 55 and 80 with a 30 pack-year history or more of smoking who are current smokers or who have quit within the last 15 years should undergo annual LDCT screening, based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial . Lung cancer is the …

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From The Archives: Should My Patient with a Solid Tumor be Anticoagulated in the Absence of Venous Thromboembolism?

March 6, 2014
From The Archives: Should My Patient with a Solid Tumor be Anticoagulated in the Absence of Venous Thromboembolism?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated September 8, 2011

By David Altszuler, Class of 2012

Faculty Peer Reviewed

An empiric association between occult malignancy and thrombophlebitis has been recognized since Trousseau first reported the syndrome in 1865. The mechanism by which cancer predisposes to thrombophilia has not been fully elucidated; however, it is now clear that this is a symbiotic relationship. The second leading cause of death in hospitalized cancer patients (and a leading cause of death in ambulatory cancer patients) is venous …

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An antidote on the horizon? An update on the progress toward achieving reversibility for the new oral anticoagulants

February 21, 2014
An antidote on the horizon? An update on the progress toward achieving reversibility for the new oral anticoagulants

By Gabriel Schneider, MD

Peer Reviewed

The new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are an appealing alternative to the burdensome vitamin K antagonists such as warfarin. These novel agents include direct thrombin inhibitors such as dabigatran (which inhibits thrombin) and factor Xa inhibitors such as rivaroxaban and apixaban (which prevent thrombin generation). Compared to warfarin, NOACs have fewer food and drug interactions, as well as a more predictable pharmacodynamic profile that serves to obviate the need for the frequent outpatient monitoring in most patients. In addition …

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Mammograms in the News, Yet Again

February 13, 2014
Mammograms in the News, Yet Again

By Miguel A. Saldivar, MD

Peer Reviewed

Mammograms are far from strangers to the paparazzi. It was only recently that a television news reporter from a prominent broadcasting company reluctantly agreed to have a mammogram performed on live television to promote breast cancer screening and help “save lives” . That same study diagnosed her with breast cancer, which was followed by the impressive statement from her physicians: “that mammogram just saved your life”. But over the last day or two several major newspapers are presenting …

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Can we teach the immune system to fight cancer?

November 1, 2013
Can we teach the immune system to fight cancer?

By Jenny Gartshteyn

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Since the start of vaccination – we’ve eradicated smallpox and polio, saved college kids from meningitis, averted flu epidemics, and decreased the incidence of HPV-related cervical cancer … but can we teach our immune systems to actively fight existing cancer?

Here’s the mechanism for an ideal anti-cancer vaccine:

With the growth and turnover of cancerous cells, cancer-specific tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) would be recognized and processed by professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells and macrophages – which would …

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