Renal

Grand Rounds: Primary Aldosteronism, Beyond Conn’s Syndrome

June 4, 2009
Grand Rounds: Primary Aldosteronism, Beyond Conn’s Syndrome

Michael Chu MD

Please also see the clinical vignette presented before Grand Rounds on the 21st of May.

The Medical Grand Rounds presentation on May 21, 2009 titled “Primary Aldosteronism, Beyond Conn’s Syndrome” was delivered by Dr. William F. Young M.D., Professor of Medicine at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. Dr. Young’s talk began with the index case of hyperaldosteronism that was described by Dr. Jerome Conn in the 1950’s, through the advances in the diagnosis of hyperaldosteronism, and on to present day treatment …

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Morning Report: Hepatorenal Syndrome

February 19, 2009
Morning Report: Hepatorenal Syndrome

Commentary by Catherine Lucero MD, PGY-3

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The patient is a 69-year old woman from El Salvador with a chief complaint of worsening abdominal distension for nine months. Three months earlier, the patient was told she had liver problems and was started on diuretics. Prior to presentation, the patient states that she stopped taking her medication and noticed increasing lower extremity edema and abdominal girth, as well as an unintentional 15-pound weight loss. The patient denied any other medical problems, including fever, chills, …

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Grand Rounds: “VEGF and Renal Thrombotic Microangiopathy”

January 21, 2009
Grand Rounds: “VEGF and Renal Thrombotic Microangiopathy”

Commentary by Ilana Bragin, MD, PGY-3

Please also see the clinical vignette presented before last week’s grand rounds.

Last week’s Medical Grand Rounds was given by guest speaker Dr. Sue Quaggin, Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Toronto, who shared with the audience her knowledge and passion of the role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) in kidney function.  VEGF is a critical family of signaling proteins that is involved in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. While the discovery of VEGF could be applied to …

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Class Act: The Role of Angiotensin II in Renal Fibrosis and Diabetic Kidney Disease

December 9, 2008
Class Act: The Role of Angiotensin II in Renal Fibrosis and Diabetic Kidney Disease

Commentary by Daniel Fine MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Diabetic nephropathy is the most frequent cause of end-stage kidney disease in the United States, Europe and Japan. Large scale randomized controlled trials have shown that both ACE inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor antagonists reduce microalbuminuria, slow rate of decline of GFR and delay end stage kidney disease.

The renin-angiotensin system plays a significant role in the human inflammatory process in addition to its well known effects on blood pressure and sodium homeostasis. The role of angiotensin …

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Diseases 2.0: Uric acid stones linked to diabetes

July 3, 2008
Diseases 2.0: Uric acid stones linked to diabetes

Diseases 2.0 – Bringing you the latest updates on disease pathophysiology and treatment

Commentary By David Goldfarb, M.D. Professor of Medicine, NYU Medical Center, Chief Nephrology Section VA New York Harbor

At the recent meeting of the National Kidney Foundation in Dallas, Dr. Orson Moe reviewed the links between diabetes and uric acid stones . Uric acid stones are most often caused by low urine pH. With a low urine pH, even relatively little uric acid can precipate, as it forms the protonated form, which …

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Grand Rounds: “Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis”

June 5, 2008
Grand Rounds: “Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis”

Commentary by Jatin Roper MD, PGY-3

Medical Grand Rounds today was presented last week by Dr. Shawn Cowper, Assistant Professor of Dermatology and Pathology at Yale University School of Medicine. Grand Rounds began with the presentation of a case from Tisch Hospital:

A 46 year old female with a history of end-stage renal disease secondary to diffuse-proliferative glomerulonephritis on hemodialysis, systemic lupus erythematosis, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, and IVC thrombosis presents to a dermatology consultant for progressive hardness, tightness, and tenderness of skin of the legs …

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Grand Rounds: “Hyponatremia: Something Old, Something New”

January 30, 2008
Grand Rounds: “Hyponatremia: Something Old, Something New”

Commentary by Elizabeth Haskins MD, PGY-3

This week’s Grand Rounds was delivered by Dr. Tomas Berl, Chief of the Nephrology Division at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver. Dr. Berl’s current research focuses on osmoregulated proteins of the inner medulla.

Hyponatremia, defined as a serum sodium concentration less than 136 mEq/L, is one of the most common electrolyte abnormalities in the hospitalized patient. In one Colorado hospital, the daily incidence of hyponatremia was 1% and the prevalence was 2.5%. The rate of …

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Tumor Lysis Syndrome and the Role of Urinary Alkalinization

September 13, 2007
Tumor Lysis Syndrome and the Role of Urinary Alkalinization

Commentary by Bani Chander MD, PGY-2, and Sergio Obligado MD, Attending Physician, Nephrology

Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is characterized by a group of metabolic abnormalities including hyperkalemia, hyperuricemia, and hyperphosphatemia with secondary hypocalcemia, following the initiation of cytotoxic therapy. Although there is no well established definition for this syndrome, the Cairo-Bishop definition is a commonly used classification system that stratifies the degree of severity by utilizing specific laboratory data and clinical features. The constellation of abnormalities that occurs in TLS is due to a …

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