Systems

Dance Therapy in Parkinson’s Disease: Can the Argentine Tango Improve Motor Function?

December 2, 2011
Dance Therapy in Parkinson’s Disease: Can the Argentine Tango Improve Motor Function?

By Neha Jindal

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder that affects over 1 million people in the United States. People with PD often demonstrate postural instability, gait difficulties, and impaired functional mobility, which can lead to falls and decreased quality of life. Medical treatments for PD do not fully address gait and balance issues and, consequently, additional approaches are needed. One approach that has recently emerged in clinical studies is the use of dance, particularly the Argentine tango, as …

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Mystery Quiz

November 30, 2011
Mystery Quiz

Vivian Hayashi MD and Robert Smith MD, Mystery Quiz Section Editors

The patient is a 52 year old African-American man who presented with breathlessness and weight loss over one month along with watery stools during the week prior to admission. He had a history of untreated HIV infection, a CD4 cell count of 5/cmm, oral candidiasis, and peri-rectal HSV infection. The patient reported occasional cough with variable sputum production but denied fever, night sweats, hemoptysis, recent travel, or sick contacts. His risk factor for …

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Does Culturing the Catheter Tip Change Patient Outcomes?

November 17, 2011
Does Culturing the Catheter Tip Change Patient Outcomes?

By Todd Cutler, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

An 82-year-old man is admitted to the intensive care unit with fevers, hypoxic respiratory failure and hypotension. He is intubated and resuscitated with intravenous fluids. A central venous catheter is placed via the internal jugular vein. A chest x-ray showed a right lower lobe infiltrate and he is treated empirically with antibiotics for pneumonia. Blood cultures grow out S. pneumoniae. After four days he is successfully extubated. The night following extubation, the patient has a fever of 100.8 …

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Does Cranberry Juice Prevent Urinary Tract Infections?

November 9, 2011
Does Cranberry Juice Prevent Urinary Tract Infections?

By Jessie Yu

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A healthy 21-year-old female college student presents to clinic after one day of dysuria and increased frequency. You diagnose her with a recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), and as you hand her a prescription for empiric antibiotic treatment, she asks you if drinking cranberry juice will prevent these in the future…

Drinking cranberry juice to prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs) has been a traditional folk remedy for hundreds of years. Stroll into any New York City pharmacy and you …

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A New Era of Therapy for Hepatitis C

November 4, 2011
A New Era of Therapy for Hepatitis C

By Alexander Jow, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major public health issue, representing the leading cause of chronic liver disease, death from liver disease, and a principal indication for liver transplantation in the US. It is estimated that 3-4 million people in the world are infected with HCV each year. Globally, 130-170 million people are chronically infected with HCV and more than 350,000 people die from HCV-related liver disease each year. Although the natural history of HCV infection …

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The Diagonal Earlobe Crease: Historical Trivia or a Useful Sign of Coronary Artery Disease?

November 2, 2011
The Diagonal Earlobe Crease: Historical Trivia or a Useful Sign of Coronary Artery Disease?

Nicholas Mark, MD & Sarah Buckley, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Background

Publius Aelius Hadrianus, better known as Hadrian, emperor of Rome (117-138 CE), traveler, warrior, and lover of all things Greek, fell ill at the age of 60. He developed progressive edema and episodic epistaxis, fell into a depression soothed by rich food and drink, and succumbed to death within 2 years. The exact cause of Hadrian’s death–whether by heart failure, glomerulonephritis, or even hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia–has been a topic of debate among paleopathologists. It …

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Should Women Be Screened For Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms?

October 26, 2011
Should Women Be Screened For Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms?

By Michael Boffa

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Laura K. sits in the office of her cardiologist waiting for the results of her follow-up aorto-iliac duplex scan. Six months ago, Laura had an endostent placed in her abdominal aorta after a 5.2 cm x 5.4 cm abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was discovered.  Though she has recently quit, Laura, now 70, smoked for a large portion of her life. Her advanced age and smoking put her at increased risk of suffering a potentially life-threatening aortic aneurysm rupture.

Approximately …

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Bariatric Surgery: A Cure for Diabetes?

October 20, 2011
Bariatric Surgery: A Cure for Diabetes?

By Amy Dinitz

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The lifetime risk of developing diabetes for persons born in 2000 is around 35% and the NHANES database has suggested a greater than fourfold increase in prevalence over the last three generations.  While bariatric surgery has become the most effective treatment for obesity, it has also been found to be an extremely effective treatment for type 2 diabetes.  It was initially thought that the weight loss experienced by patients after bariatric surgery was responsible for improved glycemic control.  However, …

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