Systems

Does Cranberry Juice Prevent Urinary Tract Infections?

November 9, 2011
Does Cranberry Juice Prevent Urinary Tract Infections?

By Jessie Yu

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A healthy 21-year-old female college student presents to clinic after one day of dysuria and increased frequency. You diagnose her with a recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), and as you hand her a prescription for empiric antibiotic treatment, she asks you if drinking cranberry juice will prevent these in the future…

Drinking cranberry juice to prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs) has been a traditional folk remedy for hundreds of years. Stroll into any New York City pharmacy and you …

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A New Era of Therapy for Hepatitis C

November 4, 2011
A New Era of Therapy for Hepatitis C

By Alexander Jow, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major public health issue, representing the leading cause of chronic liver disease, death from liver disease, and a principal indication for liver transplantation in the US. It is estimated that 3-4 million people in the world are infected with HCV each year. Globally, 130-170 million people are chronically infected with HCV and more than 350,000 people die from HCV-related liver disease each year. Although the natural history of HCV infection …

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The Diagonal Earlobe Crease: Historical Trivia or a Useful Sign of Coronary Artery Disease?

November 2, 2011
The Diagonal Earlobe Crease: Historical Trivia or a Useful Sign of Coronary Artery Disease?

Nicholas Mark, MD & Sarah Buckley, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Background

Publius Aelius Hadrianus, better known as Hadrian, emperor of Rome (117-138 CE), traveler, warrior, and lover of all things Greek, fell ill at the age of 60. He developed progressive edema and episodic epistaxis, fell into a depression soothed by rich food and drink, and succumbed to death within 2 years. The exact cause of Hadrian’s death–whether by heart failure, glomerulonephritis, or even hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia–has been a topic of debate among paleopathologists. It …

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Should Women Be Screened For Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms?

October 26, 2011
Should Women Be Screened For Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms?

By Michael Boffa

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Laura K. sits in the office of her cardiologist waiting for the results of her follow-up aorto-iliac duplex scan. Six months ago, Laura had an endostent placed in her abdominal aorta after a 5.2 cm x 5.4 cm abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) was discovered.  Though she has recently quit, Laura, now 70, smoked for a large portion of her life. Her advanced age and smoking put her at increased risk of suffering a potentially life-threatening aortic aneurysm rupture.

Approximately …

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Bariatric Surgery: A Cure for Diabetes?

October 20, 2011
Bariatric Surgery: A Cure for Diabetes?

By Amy Dinitz

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The lifetime risk of developing diabetes for persons born in 2000 is around 35% and the NHANES database has suggested a greater than fourfold increase in prevalence over the last three generations.  While bariatric surgery has become the most effective treatment for obesity, it has also been found to be an extremely effective treatment for type 2 diabetes.  It was initially thought that the weight loss experienced by patients after bariatric surgery was responsible for improved glycemic control.  However, …

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Cholera in Haiti

October 7, 2011
Cholera in Haiti

By Matt Johnson, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

In the fall of 2010, after Haiti was razed by a magnitude 7.2 earthquake that left over 316,000 people dead, cholera was injected into the tumult to add to the growing list of Haiti’s struggles . Cholera is an ancient scourge whose origins are believed to come from the Ganges River delta of India . It affects up to 5 million people worldwide, with over 100,000 deaths per year . The cholera outbreak in Haiti was unexpected in …

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Breast Self-Examination: Worth the Effort?

October 5, 2011
Breast Self-Examination: Worth the Effort?

By Katherine Husk

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A healthy 40-year-old woman comes into your office for a routine health exam.  After you have performed a clinical breast exam, she asks you whether she should be examining her breasts on her own at home…

Breast self-exam (BSE) seems sensible. Empowering a patient to develop a sense of a personal norm could allow for easier recognition of breast changes, and could perhaps lead to earlier evaluation by a medical professional. There is a great deal of controversy, however, …

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Metabolic Syndrome: Fact or Myth?

September 30, 2011
Metabolic Syndrome: Fact or Myth?

By Vicky Jones, MD

A 40-year-old female presented to her primary care provider with a chief complaint of weight gain over the past year.  She wants to be fully evaluated for any kind of medical disorder that could have caused it.  She has been seen by multiple specialists but no one can give her a “straight diagnosis”.  Their advice is for her to lose weight.  She insists she never had problems with her weight in the past and has no known medical disorders. Her physical …

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