Systems

Gratitude: Benefits for the Soul, and the Body

February 3, 2017
Gratitude: Benefits for the Soul, and the Body

By Nicole Van Groningen, MD

Peer Reviewed

Although the “stress of the holidays” is a phrase used to refer to the multitude of to-do lists and travel obligations associated with the 6-week stretch between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day, the pleasant emotional state associated with the season remains one of the most important positive influences on the American psyche. Chief among these warm emotions is an emphasis on gratitude for the people, relationships, opportunities, and circumstances we cherish. As the holiday season comes to a …

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What is the Evidence for Noninvasive Ventilation in Acute Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema?

February 1, 2017
What is the Evidence for Noninvasive Ventilation in Acute Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema?

By Jenna Conway, MD

Peer Reviewed

Introduction 

A 58-year-old man presents with worsening dyspnea and nonproductive cough for five days. Significant history includes a recent hospitalization for congestive heart failure. He is afebrile with a blood pressure of 95/55 mmHg, heart rate of 115 beats per minute, and oxygen saturation of 85% on room air. Physical exam is notable for rales bilaterally. Chest X-ray shows bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and an enlarged cardiac silhouette suggestive of cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Standard therapy is initiated with oxygen by …

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Optimism

January 25, 2017
Optimism

By Adam Blaisdell

Peer Reviewed

Present Day – The patient is a 61 year-old male who presents with a one-week history of jaundice and intense pruritus. He has a medical history significant for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (genotype 1a) diagnosed 15 years ago, which was never treated. Three years prior, the patient was also diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and underwent transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) but was subsequently lost to follow-up. He has no documented evidence of cirrhosis. On this admission his total bilirubin …

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Gamechanger? Can Pioglitazone Reduce Cardiovascular Events After a Stroke? An Analysis of the IRIS Trial

January 19, 2017
Gamechanger?  Can Pioglitazone Reduce Cardiovascular Events After a Stroke?  An Analysis of the IRIS Trial

By Johanna Hase, MD

Peer Reviewed

Welcome to Gamechangers, a series that takes a critical look at the latest in medical literature to answer one important question: would the results of this article change my practice? Featuring thorough evidence-based review as well as expert commentary, our aim is for this series to help you decide if the results of a given study are, in fact, a gamechanger

A 64 year old woman with pre-diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension on aspirin, losartan and simvastatin, recently was diagnosed …

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Balancing patient information with our professional and relational duties to patients and families without appealing to paternalism.

December 2, 2016
Balancing patient information with our professional and relational duties to patients and families without appealing to paternalism.

A commentary by Antonella Surbone, MD PhD FACP, Ethics Editor on  yesterday’s article “Is There Such a Thing as Too Much Information?”

The insighftul and challenging piece Is there such a thing as too much information? by Mariya Rozenblit addresses a key issue in today’s medicine: how much information do we need to provide to our patients to enable them to make autonomous informed choices about their health, illnesses and treatments. She provides many data and examples from the literature to illustrate the potential damages …

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Gamechanger? Is Spironolactone the Magic Bullet for Resistant Hypertension?

November 9, 2016
Gamechanger?  Is Spironolactone the Magic Bullet for Resistant Hypertension?

By Amar Parikh, MD

Peer Reviewed

Welcome to Gamechangers, a series that takes a critical look at the latest in medical literature to answer one important question: would the results of this article change my practice? Featuring thorough evidence-based review as well as expert commentary, our aim is for this series to help you decide if the results of a given study are, in fact, a gamechanger.

A 65 year-old Hispanic male with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and erectile dysfunction presents to clinic for

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The Rising Tide of Food Allergy

October 20, 2016
The Rising Tide of Food Allergy

By Kristina Cieslak, MD

Peer Reviewed

Food allergies affect approximately 8% of children and 5% of adults, with a steadily increasing prevalence .  Risk factors for the development of food allergy are numerous and include genetics, sex, and ethnicity . Indeed, children with a parent or sibling with peanut allergy are seven times more likely to develop a peanut allergy of their own, and peanut allergy demonstrates a 64% concordance rate among monozygotic twins as compared to 7% among dizygotic twins . The …

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Oxygen-Induced Hypercapnia in COPD: What is the Mechanism?

September 28, 2016
Oxygen-Induced Hypercapnia in COPD: What is the Mechanism?

By Jonathan Glatt

Peer Reviewed 

It was my first week on the wards as a third-year medical student, and I found myself huddled with the team in a busy corner of the Bellevue ED, listening to a man cough and wheeze his way through an interview. He was an elderly patient with an extensive smoking history–a lifetime of a destructive habit that had dilated and distorted his lungs beyond repair. He told us, between bouts of breathlessness, of worsening dyspnea and copious sputum production over …

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