Systems

Little Knowledge, Large Problem: Lack of Nutrition and Obesity Education in Medical Curricula

September 23, 2016
Little Knowledge, Large Problem: Lack of Nutrition and Obesity Education in Medical Curricula

By Elissa Driggin

Peer Reviewed

At almost every single one of my medical school interviews, each interviewer, noting my college major in nutritional science, asked some variation of the question, “What should I be eating to stay healthy?” Each time, I was left unsure of whether or not this question was aimed to gauge my ability to hold a conversation in a stressful environment, articulate my thoughts in a logical manner, or fulfill some other mysterious goal of the infamous medical school interview process. Or, …

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Breaking the Cycle: Shining a Light on Physician Depression and Suicide for the Next Generation

September 16, 2016
Breaking the Cycle: Shining a Light on Physician Depression and Suicide for the Next Generation

By Andrew Hallett

Peer Reviewed 

For decades, surveys and public data have shown staggeringly high rates of suicide, suicidal ideation, and depression among physicians when compared to the general population.1-4 Male doctors are 40% more likely to commit suicide than other men, and female doctors are 130% more likely to do so than other women, according to a 2004 analysis in the American Journal of Psychiatry.5 With expanded access to care and new regulatory requirements under the Affordable Care Act increasing pressure on doctors, a …

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Botox: Not Just for Wrinkles Anymore

July 28, 2016
Botox: Not Just for Wrinkles Anymore

Samantha Kass Newman, MD

Peer Reviewed

You can get a Botox injection almost anywhere these days. Internists, dermatologists, and even gynecologists have capitalized on an aging group of baby boomers who aren’t fans of their wrinkles. And it’s true that with an impressive safety profile, few contraindications, rapid effectiveness, and positive cash return for providers, botulinum toxin injections for cosmetic purposes can make everyone happy.

Botulinim toxin is produced by the anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium botulinum. This is the strongest toxin found in nature. When injected …

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Sex or Drugs: Why Do We See An Increased Incidence of Oropharyngeal Cancer?

July 13, 2016
Sex or Drugs: Why Do We See An Increased Incidence of Oropharyngeal Cancer?

By Tyler Litton, MD

Peer Reviewed

Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is relatively rare but incidence has increased in the US over the past 40 years. Tonsillar cancer is the most common type of OPSCC followed by base of tongue cancer, which together account for 90% of all OPSCCs. The incidence of both tonsillar and base of tongue cancers individually have also increased in the US. OPSCC is more common in men than women and smoking and alcohol are well known risk factors for …

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Stroke 2.0: Novel methods of Detection, Selection and Intervention in Acute Cerebral Ischemia

June 29, 2016
Stroke 2.0: Novel methods of Detection, Selection and Intervention in Acute Cerebral Ischemia

By David Valentine, MD

Peer Reviewed

Stroke is among the costliest disorders in the world for both individuals and society. Every hour of an evolving stroke kills 120 million neurons, destroys 830 billion synapses and degrades 714 kilometers of myelinated fibers, aging the brain by 3.6 years in those 60 minutes1. It is the leading cause of adult disability in the USA, currently costing $70 billion a year2 with $2.2 trillion more projected over the next forty years3. The global burden is even higher.

Despite …

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The Brain’s Effect on the Heart After a Stroke

June 22, 2016
The Brain’s Effect on the Heart After a Stroke

By Rory Abrams, MD

Peer Reviewed 

The heart and brain are hopelessly intertwined. Their connection is greater than the tissues and sinews that physically tether them to the human body, and can be understood in three ways: 1) how the heart affects the brain, 2) how the brain affects the heart, and 3) how the heart and brain are both affected by various neuro-cardiac syndromes.  The heart’s effects on the brain are illustrated when there is hypoperfusion of the brain resulting in syncope, or when …

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Outpatient Rhythm Monitoring: Available Options and Diagnostic Yield

March 29, 2016
Outpatient Rhythm Monitoring: Available Options and Diagnostic Yield

By Iulia Giuroiu, MD

Peer Reviewed

A 70-year-old woman with hypertension, early dementia, and non-specific chest pain of unclear etiology presents with recurrent left-sided chest pain. Unfortunately, she is a poor historian; it appears that her chest pain is similar to past episodes. Prior workups, which included an echocardiogram, had been unremarkable. To confound matters further, the patient’s current pain appears to be reproducible when pressure is applied to her chest. She is admitted overnight for close observation. No electrocardiogram (ECG) changes are found and …

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Exercise-Induced Rhabdomyolysis: How Fitness May Actually Be Hurting You

March 17, 2016
Exercise-Induced Rhabdomyolysis: How Fitness May Actually Be Hurting You

By Jessica Morgan

Peer Reviewed

CrossFit and SoulCycle. To many people these words mean nothing. However, ask any twenty-something or college student and they will probably tell you they have participated in a class or two, or have a friend who participates. Depending on whom you approach, you might even get the sense that these are not just exercise classes, but more like a spiritual experience or a tight-knit community of like-minded individuals, all striving for physical excellence. Some have accused these programs of being …

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