Systems

Mystery Quiz

December 21, 2012
Mystery Quiz

Elizabeth Mulaikal MD, Vivian Hayashi MD, Robert Smith MD

The patient is a 55 year old African American male with a 60 pack year history of tobacco use and AIDS,who presented with 1 month of intermittent fevers and weight loss. His most recent CD4 count and viral load were 2/cmm and 50,623 copies/mL, respectively. Prior opportunistic infections included pneumocystis pneumonia and thrush. He was previously homeless, but currently resides in a Single Room Occupancy Housing. Upon presentation he complained of occasional night sweats, but no…

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Kidney Stones and Climate Change

October 10, 2012
Kidney Stones and Climate Change

By Jeffrey Shyu, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Climate change has been linked to a variety of adverse effects on human health, effects that are expected to worsen in the coming decades . For example, a heat wave in August 2003 resulted in nearly 15000 deaths in France, and the anticipated increase in average world temperatures is expected to lead to longer and more frequent heat waves that will disproportionately affect our more vulnerable populations. Infectious disease outbreaks, particularly vector-borne ones such as malaria, are expected…

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Olympics and Medicine By The Numbers

October 7, 2012
Olympics and Medicine By The Numbers

By Tracey Liebman

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The summer games may be over, but we’re still entertained by the 2012 Olympics! Here are a few medicine-related fun facts about the London Games.

Demographics of Summer 2012 Olympics:

10,500 athletes, 70,000+ volunteers, 20,000 media and journalists, 10+ million spectators

Medical care:

26 million dollars provided by the National Health Service (NHS) to build the state-of-the-art medical building in the Athletes’ Village for the Olympics

500 people expected to use the medical clinic each day …

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Morgellons: Real Disease or Delusion Turned Internet Meme?

October 3, 2012
Morgellons: Real Disease or Delusion Turned Internet Meme?

By Robert Mazgaj

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Morgellons disease is an “unexplained dermopathy” characterized by fibers emerging from skin lesions, and associated with various cutaneous sensations. Inspired by a curious medical condition reported by a 17th century English physician, Morgellons was actually named in 2002 by Mary Leitao, a layperson, to describe the mysterious set of symptoms reportedly suffered by her then 2-year-old son. Leitao then launched the not-for-profit Morgellons Research Foundation (MRF) along with a (no longer active) website, www.morgellons.org. MRF successfully petitioned members of…

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How to Get Your Patient a Kidney

September 28, 2012
How to Get Your Patient a Kidney

By Ilina Datkhaeva

Faculty Peer Reviewed

We give hope to patients with advanced kidney disease that a transplant will save them from their Monday, Wednesday, Friday trips to the dialysis unit. But how certain are we that they even qualify to be a recipient? And if they do, are they going to live long enough to get their new lease on life?

Kidney donation has received its fair share of publicity recently, from the allocation of organs to illegal immigrants to Good Samaritans…

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From The Archives – Myths and Realities: Heart and Wine

September 27, 2012
From The Archives – Myths and Realities: Heart and Wine

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated August 26, 2010

By Aditya Mattoo, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Not too long ago, a patient came to my clinic and said (I’m paraphrasing of course), “I never cared for alcohol, doctor, so I haven’t had much to drink since my college days. Maybe champagne or wine on the rare special occasion, but I keep hearing about how wine is good for your heart, so I am thinking I should start drinking regularly.” For years I have…

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What Is Andropause? Is Testosterone Supplementation the Answer in Older Men?

September 20, 2012
What Is Andropause?  Is Testosterone Supplementation the Answer in Older Men?

By Kylie Birnbaum

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Women have long bemoaned menopause and its physiological, psychological, and sexual effects. Fortunately, hormone replacement therapy has provided relief for symptomatic women. Less attention is paid to men, who also experience declines in their sex hormones. Decreased testosterone may explain many symptoms experienced by elderly men, such as poor sexual function and libido, decreased bone mineral density, fatigue, and decreased muscle mass and strength. Should physicians treat elderly men with testosterone replacement therapy?

Late-onset hypogonadism, or “andropause,” is the…

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Vancomycin Resistance in Staphylococcus Aureus: A Dangerous Dent in Our Armamentarium?

September 13, 2012
Vancomycin Resistance in Staphylococcus Aureus: A Dangerous Dent in Our Armamentarium?

By Bryan Stierman

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Staphylococcus aureus, first discovered in the 1880s, is one of the most widespread human pathogens. It is also a commensal organism, with about 20% of the population permanently colonized and 60% of the population intermittently colonized. There is a wide variety of potential diseases that may develop when S aureus further invades the body, necessitating the use of antibiotics. Since the introduction of antibiotics into clinical practice, S aureus has developed unique ways to combat them. The evolution of…

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Fractional Excretion of Sodium (FENa): Diagnostic Godsend or Gimmick?

September 5, 2012
Fractional Excretion of Sodium (FENa): Diagnostic Godsend or Gimmick?

By Jon-Emile S Kenny, MD

Faculty Peer Reviwed

A 62- year-old man with a history of hypertension, diastolic dysfunction and chronic kidney disease is admitted 4 days after beginning outpatient treatment of community acquired pneumonia with cefpodoxime and azithromycin; he had been intermittently vomiting for two days, but proudly states that he has been keeping all of his home medications down, including hydrochlorothiazide. The morning after his admission, he was noted to have a serum creatinine of 3.4 mg/dL (from a baseline of 1.7 mg/dL).…

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Are Dentists Really Causing Infective Endocarditis?

August 29, 2012
Are Dentists Really Causing Infective Endocarditis?

By Jeffrey Krutoy, DDS

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Bacterial infective endocarditis is a potentially devastating disease, and while it may be an easy tradition to blame the dentist, recent research and new guidelines from the American Heart Association (AHA) indicate that it may not be so simple.

Infective endocarditis (IE), while relatively uncommon (with yearly incidence rates ranging from 2 to 6 cases per 100,000 people), results in high rates of morbidity and mortality even when treated. For this reason, physicians have emphasized the importance…

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Should We Measure Apolipoproteins to Evaluate Coronary Heart Disease Risk?

August 24, 2012
Should We Measure Apolipoproteins to Evaluate Coronary Heart Disease Risk?

By Navya Nair, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the major cause of mortality worldwide. Lipoproteins play a major role in the development of this disease. Current guidelines advocate that low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol should be the primary target for lipid lowering therapy. However, there is a growing literature on the atherogenic potential of apolipoprotein B (apo B)-containing lipoproteins and the protective effect of apolipoprotein A-one (apo AI)-containing lipoproteins. Many studies suggest that these apolipoproteins be used as markers to evaluate risk…

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From The Archives: The Role of Serologic Testing in the Diagnosis of Celiac Disease

August 23, 2012
From The Archives: The Role of Serologic Testing in the Diagnosis of Celiac Disease

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated, August 18, 2010

By Todd Cutler

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A 31-year-old woman presents to the clinic with chronic fatigue. She was diagnosed with iron  deficiency anemia when she was 25 years old and has since taken oral contraceptives to limit bleeding during menstruation which she describes as minimal. She has a family history significant for an older brother with celiac disease. She is thin and her exam is significant for conjunctival pallor. Her laboratory findings are

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