PrimeCuts

ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

May 28, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Josh Olstein MD, NYU Chief Resident 

This week’s edition of shortcuts begins with an article from the NEJM looking at the role of cardiac troponin in patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Many of us have “cycled the trops” countless times to evaluate patients with chest pain. However the utility of troponin measurement in patients with CHF is less clear. In this study the authors examined short-term outcomes of patients admitted with CHF exacerbations that had troponin data available on…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

May 19, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Michael Tanner, M.D., Section Editor, Clinical Correlations

In the May 15th issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report,  the CDC recommends vaccinating all people 60 and older against shingles with one dose of zoster vaccine.  Let’s all get straight with the nomenclature here.  Varicella is chickenpox, zoster is shingles, and varicella zoster is the DNA herpesvirus that causes both of them.  Ninety-eight percent of adult Americans have varicella zoster virus latently lurking in their sensory dorsal root ganglia neurons.  The…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

May 12, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Cara Litvin MD, Executive Editor, Clinical Correlations

Making headlines this week was a study published in JAMA analyzing prospective data from over 100,000 female participants in the Nurses’ Health Study for 22 years of follow-up. 64% of deaths among current smokers and 28% of deaths among former smokers were attributable to cigarette smoking. However, an encouraging 13% reduction in all cause mortality was seen within the first 5 years of quitting smoking, and after 20 years, the excess risk decreased to…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

May 6, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Sean Cavanaugh MD, Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations

More strong evidence is popping up in the journals indicating that genes might actually be important in determining disease. Who knew? Now that we are well into the dawning age of genetically determined diagnosis and therapy, this week features a few interesting articles on recently discovered genetic associations with particular disease. Other than that – it’s all about global hypertension…

The Lancet features a type of research increasingly seen in the major journals:…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

April 28, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

This week’s ShortCuts begins with a follow up of a story first presented in March, 2008, when the recall of potentially contaminated heparin was reported.

Typical case: 73 year old woman with a complex medical history including end-stage renal disease treated with the use of hemodialysis for 7 years routinely receives heparin intravenously during hemodialysis. In January 2008, during a dialysis session, she develops hypotension with associated nausea and…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

April 21, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Danise Schiliro-Chuang, NYU Chief Resident

Welcome to this week’s edition of ShortCuts. Hope that everyone has enjoyed the nice spring weekend weather.

Let’s begin with some news in the world of medical informatics. In an article published in the April 17 edition of NEJM and that grabbed the attention of the New York Times, authors Mandl and Kohane discuss the pros and cons of personally controlled health records (PCHRs). Two large corporations, Microsoft and Google, have begun to offer patients…

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Shortcuts-This Week in the Journals

April 14, 2008
Shortcuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Michael Poles MD, Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations 

It’s time again for this week’s shortcuts, and I have got some interesting things to discuss. Anyone who has spent time in our hospitals these days has been inundated with pleads to be careful with sound-alike or look-alike medications, such as MSO4 and MgSO4. A recent U.S. Pharmacopeia review of more than 26,000 patient records supports that effort.  The investigators found that there are 3,170 pairs of drug names that look or…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

April 7, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Neil Shapiro, MD, Editor in Chief, Clinical Correlations

The hot news stories this week were the early release articles highlighted at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meetings. We will save most of those stories for our upcoming summary of the meeting. Let it be said however that there is serious zetia fatigue around these parts, as the same controversial article made the rounds on the news cycles for the second time now that it was officially released. Unfortunately most of…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

March 31, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Sean Cavanaugh MD, Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations

We start this week’s Shortcuts with the cheery news that another drug is being investigated for a possible association with mood disorder and suicidality. First there was Rimonbant, then Varenicline (Chantix) and now Singulair, a leukotriene receptor antagonist used primarily in children to treat asthma and allergic rhinitisis, is getting attention for a potential link with increased dysphoric mood and suicidality. The FDA announced their investigation last week but has not issued specific treatment…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

March 25, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Henry Tran MD

The seasons of the year, like governors of New York, change quickly. And with that, we welcome the new spring, a time of rebirth and renewal!

Well sticking with the spring theme, it seems “newer blood” might be safer than “older blood.” There has been evidence to suggest that during storage, red blood cells undergo functional and structural changes which impair RBC function (termed “storage lesion”). A retrospective study from Cleveland Clinic published in the NEJM examined…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

March 17, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Josh Olstein MD, Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations

Let’s begin this St. Patrick’s Day edition of ShortCuts with a look across the pond. An article published in this week’s edition of The Lancet that studied the use of antibiotics for adults with acute rhinosinusitis. Anyone who’s been to clinic this winter knows that rarely a session goes by without at least one patient requesting antibiotics for this more-than-questionable indication. By performing a meta-analysis using individual patient data from nine placebo-controlled trials of…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

March 10, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Cara Litvin MD, Executive Editor, Clinical Correlations 

Vaccines were the buzz this week after it was made public that a federal government program designed to compensate people after vaccine injuries agreed to compensate the family of an autistic child, concluding that the vaccines may have “aggravated” an underlying mitochondrial disorder, leading to autism-like symptoms. The case drew new attention to a long standing controversy centering on the possible link between thimersol, a preservative previously used in childhood vaccines, and autism. However, many major studies…

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