PrimeCuts

ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

March 25, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Henry Tran MD

The seasons of the year, like governors of New York, change quickly. And with that, we welcome the new spring, a time of rebirth and renewal!

Well sticking with the spring theme, it seems “newer blood” might be safer than “older blood.” There has been evidence to suggest that during storage, red blood cells undergo functional and structural changes which impair RBC function (termed “storage lesion”). A retrospective study from Cleveland Clinic published in the NEJM examined…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

March 17, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Josh Olstein MD, Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations

Let’s begin this St. Patrick’s Day edition of ShortCuts with a look across the pond. An article published in this week’s edition of The Lancet that studied the use of antibiotics for adults with acute rhinosinusitis. Anyone who’s been to clinic this winter knows that rarely a session goes by without at least one patient requesting antibiotics for this more-than-questionable indication. By performing a meta-analysis using individual patient data from nine placebo-controlled trials of…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

March 10, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Cara Litvin MD, Executive Editor, Clinical Correlations 

Vaccines were the buzz this week after it was made public that a federal government program designed to compensate people after vaccine injuries agreed to compensate the family of an autistic child, concluding that the vaccines may have “aggravated” an underlying mitochondrial disorder, leading to autism-like symptoms. The case drew new attention to a long standing controversy centering on the possible link between thimersol, a preservative previously used in childhood vaccines, and autism. However, many major studies…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

March 4, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

There were many medical stories in the news last week that seemed relevant and worthy of a spot in this week’s ShortCuts. First, the CDC released a statement regarding the flu in its February 9th issue of MMWR. The CDC conducts surveillance in several ways and this year appears to have more states reporting flu activity and more specimens positive for influenza than in the last 3 years. The question has arisen…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

February 25, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Danise Schiliro-Chuang MD, NYU Chief Resident 

Hello and welcome to this week’s shortcuts. Let’s jump right to what’s new in the journals.

Two large, multicenter, randomized controlled studies published in the February 13 issue of JAMA show that patients with acute lung injury may benefit from higher positive end-expiratory pressures (PEEP). In the first study by Meade et al. the control arm received low target tidal volumes of 6ml/kg, plateau airway pressures not exceeding 30cm H20 and conventional levels of PEEP.…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

February 18, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Michael Poles MD, Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations 

Welcome back blogophiles to this week’s clinical correlations. Hope you all had a nice President’s Day weekend. Now, let’s move on to the discussion.

I was a bit disturbed last night, while watching 60 minutes on TV. Their first piece was an expose on Bayer’s drug Trasylol (aprotinin), which has been used for 14 years to control bleeding in the OR. This blockbuster drug resulted in earnings of hundreds of millions…

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Shortcuts-This Week in the Journals

February 11, 2008
Shortcuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Aaron Lord MD, Copy Editor, Clinical Correlations

The medical news event of the week was of course the early termination of the glucose control arm of the ACCORD trial, which showed increased mortality with intensive glucose control. You can check it out via our post on the trial by Endocrinology Section Editor Melissa Freeman.  Also, make sure to eyeball Goede’s et al. study in this week’s NEJM which showed decreased mortality with intensive glucose control.  Stay tuned as this interesting story…

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Shortcuts-This Week in the Journals: The Superbowl Edition

February 5, 2008
Shortcuts-This Week in the Journals: The Superbowl Edition

Commentary By: Joshua Olstein, MD Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations

Let’s begin this week by congratulating the Superbowl XLII champion New York Giants on an excellent victory. As Americans wakes up the day after and begin to recover from our collective binge on nachos, wings, guacamole and all other things trans-fat, let us review some of the recent literature in a vascular disease-themed edition of shortcuts.

Perhaps the most concerning study in light of Sunday’s nail-bitter are the results from a study published…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

January 28, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Henry Tran, MD

Old adage: just because it’s new doesn’t necessarily mean it’s better. The FDA approved the usage of drug-eluting stents (DES) in 2003 and these stents were quickly embraced by the cardiology community as a technological breakthrough in the treatment of coronary artery disease. It’s estimated that more than six million people worldwide have been implanted with a DES. In 2006, two studies created a lot of discussion by reporting an increased incidence of late stent thrombosis with DES…

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Shortcuts-This Week in the Journals

January 22, 2008
Shortcuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Sean Cavanaugh MD, Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations

If you think the modern scientific literature is reading more and more like science fiction each day, get a load of this: apparently they are growing hearts in Minneapolis. More than an interestingly macabre headline, this represents a significant advancement toward a dream long held by transplant physicians, and allows for a more vivid imagining of the day when we have the technology to grow organs from an individual’s own stem cells. The accomplishment,…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

January 14, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Cara Litvin MD, Executive Editor, Clinical Correlations

Published in the NEJM this week was a study intended to conclusively determine whether corticosteroids are an effective adjunctive therapy in severe sepsis. Although corticosteroid use is a widely accepted therapy for the treatment of sepsis, prior evidence supporting this practice has been lacking. In this multicenter randomized double-blind trial (CORTICUS), ICU patients were randomized to receive a full course of hydrocortisone therapy versus placebo. Corticotropin stimulation tests were performed in all patients. The…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

January 7, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

This week’s Annals of Internal Medicine focused on angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB). Two studies addressed questions such as: Which class (ACE/ARB or both) is more effective as an anti-hypertensive? Which class is more effective for proteinuria? What are the adverse events of the combination? What are long term outcomes?

The first article was a systematic review that compares these drugs as anti-hypertensive agents.…

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