Musculoskeletal

Is it Time to Skip the Gym?

January 15, 2014
Is it Time to Skip the Gym?

By Robert Mocharla, MD

Peer Reviewed

No. Sorry. Despite such reasonable excuses as – “I forgot my iPod”, “It’s pouring rain”, or “Game of Thrones is on” — an exhaustive literature search will not reveal a shred of evidence that you or most of your patients should skip daily exercise. However, a subset of your patients should indeed be skipping workouts regularly. The group referred to consists of endurance athletes (e.g. cyclists, swimmers, long-distance runners, competitive athletes). While this may not describe the majority of…

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Does Running Cause Knee Osteoarthritis?

September 14, 2013
Does Running Cause Knee Osteoarthritis?

By Karin Katz, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Post-summer is here. Despite the heat and what feels like 100% humidity, the East River Path is packed with runners. No amount of car fumes pouring onto the path could stop those in training. Others are circling the 6-mile-loop around Central Park. Or, if you are bored of running the typical routes, for a few Saturdays, Park Avenue will be shut down for automobile traffic. New Yorkers love to run (well, some do). And while unforeseen circumstances…

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An Evaluation of Basic Running Techniques: A Guide for Health Practitioners and the Novice Runner

September 11, 2013
An Evaluation of Basic Running Techniques: A Guide for Health Practitioners and the Novice Runner

By Austin Peters, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Introduction

Running injuries are common, afflicting greater than two-thirds of frequent runners each year. Despite the abundance of available resources, there are no clear guidelines to extend to patients on the subject of proper running technique in order to avoid repeat or worsening injuries. Though specialized intervention may be in order for more severe cases, novice runners and those who have not been active in the sport for some time may benefit from basic instructional advice. The purpose…

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Olympics and Medicine By The Numbers

October 7, 2012
Olympics and Medicine By The Numbers

By Tracey Liebman

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The summer games may be over, but we’re still entertained by the 2012 Olympics! Here are a few medicine-related fun facts about the London Games.

Demographics of Summer 2012 Olympics:

10,500 athletes, 70,000+ volunteers, 20,000 media and journalists, 10+ million spectators

Medical care:

26 million dollars provided by the National Health Service (NHS) to build the state-of-the-art medical building in the Athletes’ Village for the Olympics

500 people expected to use the medical clinic each day …

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Class Act: Is there clinical evidence for the use of chondroitin sulfate in the treatment of osteoarthritis?

October 17, 2008
Class Act: Is there clinical evidence for the use of chondroitin sulfate in the treatment of osteoarthritis?

Class act is a feature of Clinical Correlations written by NYU 3rd and 4th year medical students. Prior to publication, each commentary is thoroughly reviewed for content by a faculty member.

Commentary by Jillian Borman, MS-4, Reviewed by Svetlana Krasnokutsky, MD, Clinical Instructor, NYU Department of Medicine

Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common causes of joint pain in the aging population. The pain of OA, which is generally worsened with joint use and alleviated with rest, is typically described as a deep…

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Clinical Question: How do you manage plantar fasciitis?

July 19, 2007
Clinical Question: How do you manage plantar fasciitis?

Commentary by Cathy Cruise, M.D. Director Department of Veterans Affairs Care Coordinator, Chair Rehabilitation Council

Case: A 25 year old woman with no significant past medical history presents to walk-in clinic complaining of several days of right heel pain. She notes that the pain is quite sharp and worst when walking. It is so severe that she has skipped her morning run for three consecutive days. She has tried taking acetaminophen which has provided minimal symptom relief. Physical exam reveals mild swelling and…

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Class Act: Is there evidence to support chiropractic care of low back pain?

July 18, 2007
Class Act: Is there evidence to support chiropractic care of low back pain?

Welcome to Class Act, a new feature of Clinical Correlations. Class act will feature posts written by NYU 3rd and 4th year medical students. These posts will focus on evidenced based answers to clinical questions related to patients seen by our students in the clinics or on the wards. Prior to publication, each commentary is thoroughly reviewed for content by a faculty member. Enjoy…

Commentary by Brian Liem, MSIV

A 52 year old male with no medical problems presents to your clinic with a…

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Bedside Rounds: What is Lasegue’s Sign?

July 10, 2007
Bedside Rounds: What is Lasegue’s Sign?

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

A 66 year old woman with a history of dyslipidemia and remote tobacco use presents with a sudden onset of pain located in her posterior left thigh radiating down her left leg below the knee. The pain began during the course of an upper respiratory illness with a cough. The pain is burning in quality and is bothersome day and night. NSAIDs have been taken and relieve the pain temporarily.…

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Should You Recommend Surgery or Conservative Care for Disc Herniation?

November 29, 2006
Should You Recommend Surgery or Conservative Care for Disc Herniation?

In the November 22nd issue of JAMA, the results of two studies from the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) on lumbar disk surgery for persistent radicular pain are reported.  Both these studies sought to assess the efficacy of surgery for lumbar disk herniation as compared to nonoperative treatment, including counseling, anti-inflammatory medications, injections, and physical therapy. It is important to note that specific inclusion criteria were radicular pain as well as imaging showing disk herniation.  Because a large number of study participants declined randomization,…

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Improving Stroke Recovery-The EXCITE Trial

November 9, 2006
Improving Stroke Recovery-The EXCITE Trial

The EXCITE trial was the lead article in last week’s JAMA. It looks at a 2 week program of contstraint induced movement therapy vs. usual care in patients suffering a cva within the previous 3-9 months. Pt’s in the treatment arm wore a restraining mitt on the less-affected hand and engaged in tasks/behaviors with the hemiplegic hand. This group was compared to a control group with usual care. Measures of performance time and motor function ability all showed clinically relevant improvements that persisted out…

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