Class Act

How Do You Advise the Balding Patient?

January 13, 2010
How Do You Advise the Balding Patient?

Sagar Mungekar

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The incidence of male pattern hair loss can reach almost 100% in some ethnic groups.1, 2 While treatment of the condition is usually deferred to dermatologists, it is often the primary care physician (PCP) who is first approached for advice. Several medical and surgical treatments exist for male pattern hair loss. Herbal supplements and products on infomercials make cursory non-FDA-approved claims of hair growth. Minoxidil, once developed for hypertension, is available over the counter…

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What is the Role of Drug Therapy in Treating Obesity?

November 19, 2009
What is the Role of Drug Therapy in Treating Obesity?

Arlene Chung

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Despite the high prevalence of obesity1 and its associated morbidity2 and mortality 3,4, it represents one of the most difficult chronic conditions to treat. Barriers include a metabolically toxic environment, a history of ill-fated weight-loss regimens, and a general view of obesity as primarily a social, not a medical problem. 5 Deep down, the belief that obesity really is the result of gluttony and sloth probably persists. However, as we learn more about the…

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It’s Lyme Season: How Should You Manage the Tick-bitten Patient?

October 14, 2009
It’s Lyme Season:  How Should You Manage the Tick-bitten Patient?

Joshua Allen-Dicker

Faculty peer reviewed

A healthy 42-year old patient presents to your office after a day of hiking with his family in Upstate New York. This morning in the shower he found a “big black tick” on his right leg. He is currently asymptomatic and wants to know what his risk of Lyme disease is.

For New York City physicians, the end of summer and beginning of fall herald a spike in cases of Lyme Disease.…

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Sleep, Memory, and Medical Students

October 2, 2009
Sleep, Memory, and Medical Students

Megan Mulligan

Faculty peer reviewed by Dr. David Rapoport

The role of sleep in memory formation is an intriguing topic that has garnered widespread interest among researchers in recent years. The subject has seen a doubling in the number of publications every decade, yet the mechanism by which memories are formed remains elusive. There is little debate that sleep is important for memory, which begs the question: What does the role of sleep in memory imply for the infamously…

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The Forgotten Influenza of 1918: When a Strong Immune System Becomes a Weakness

September 23, 2009
The Forgotten Influenza of 1918: When a Strong Immune System Becomes a Weakness

Emily Breidbart

Faculty peer reviewed

As the threat of the swine flu surfaced in early 2009, doctors and the media referenced the influenza of 1918. Also known as the Spanish flu, this pandemic spread to nearly every part of the world and killed more humans than any other disease in a similar period in known history. According to an epidemiological study done in 2002, this unusually virulent strain of influenza A, subtype H1N1, is said to have killed approximately 50 million…

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The Utility of GlycoMark ™: 1,5 Anhydroglucitol as a Marker for Glycemic Control

September 16, 2009
The Utility of GlycoMark ™: 1,5 Anhydroglucitol as a Marker for Glycemic Control

David R. Friedmann MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Hemoglobin A1 (Hb A1c) is the standard method for monitoring diabetic patients’ long-term glycemic control by indicating average blood glucose levels over a period of two months, or half of the average life span of red blood cells. A new biochemical marker GlycoMarkTM is a test that measures serum levels of 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG), a monosaccharide derived from ingestion of food, slightly different in structure from glucose. The test has been available in…

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How Should You Approach a Geriatric Insomniac?

September 2, 2009
How Should You Approach a Geriatric Insomniac?

Gilda Boroumand, MS4

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Chronic insomnia, defined as difficulty with the initiation, maintenance, duration, and quality of sleep for at least one month, is a common complaint with significant impact on an individual’s daytime functioning and quality of life. It is particularly prevalent in the elderly, affecting between 23% to 34% of individuals over the age of 64. This same group is also more likely to experience adverse effects from various treatment regimens, thus leaving physicians with…

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CT Colonography-The Future of Colorectal Cancer Screening?

August 21, 2009
CT Colonography-The Future of Colorectal Cancer Screening?

Ely R. Felker


Faculty Peer Reviewed

The patient is a 52 year-old white male who presented to his internist for a routine examination. He has no family history of colorectal cancer. He has not previously been screened. He recently heard about CT colonography and would like to know how it compares to conventional colonoscopy. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the second most common cause of cancer death…

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Class Act: How Do You Diagnose Polymyalgia Rheumatica?

August 12, 2009
Class Act: How Do You Diagnose Polymyalgia Rheumatica?

Eve Wadsworth MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is a condition that resembles several different disorders including osteoarthritis and can be difficult to diagnose. In addition to osteoarthritis, PMR can resemble conditions as diverse as depression, fibromyalgia, myopathic drug reactions, and malignancy. PMR, however, can be associated with dangerous consequences, namely blindness, and is responsive to well-established treatment regimens. As such, familiarity with PMR’s presentation and its unique features is critical so as to avoid serious complications that…

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Class Act: A Multivitamin a Day – Does It Really Keep the Doctor Away?

June 3, 2009
Class Act: A Multivitamin a Day – Does It Really Keep the Doctor Away?

Does daily use of a multivitamin help prevent illness and chronic disease?

Kate Gibson, MS-4

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A 65 year old male patient with a history of hypertension and hyperlipidemia comes into the clinic for a regular visit. On his way out he asks, “Should I be taking a multivitamin?” You stop and think for a minute and decide, why not? But is there any actual evidence supporting the effectiveness of daily use of a multivitamin?…

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Class Act: Cardiac CT to Assess Coronary Artery Calcium

May 17, 2009
Class Act: Cardiac CT to Assess Coronary Artery Calcium

Matthew Nayor

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The patient: a 55 year old male nonsmoker with an HDL of 46, LDL of 120, triglycerides of 70, BP of 135/80 (on meds) and total cholesterol of 180. (Framingham 10-year risk of MI = 12%)

Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Despite our understanding of how family history, toxic habits, cholesterol, and blood pressure affect the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), there is a clear need to…

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Class Act: AGE-RAGE: What we know about the pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy.

December 26, 2008
Class Act: AGE-RAGE: What we know about the pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy.

Commentary by Regina Mysliwiec, NYU Medical Student

Faculty Peer Reviewed

G.L. is a 62 year-old African-American male with a six year history of Type 2 Diabetes with variable glucose control and a progressive one year history of burning pain in a unilateral T10 distribution. The pain began at his right abdomen, then spread first to his umbilicus and finally ventrodorsally to his spine. His most recent HgbA1c is 8.0.

One does not have to be a medical student in New York…

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