Diseases 2.0

Breaking the Cycle: Shining a Light on Physician Depression and Suicide for the Next Generation

September 16, 2016
Breaking the Cycle: Shining a Light on Physician Depression and Suicide for the Next Generation

By Andrew Hallett

Peer Reviewed 

For decades, surveys and public data have shown staggeringly high rates of suicide, suicidal ideation, and depression among physicians when compared to the general population.1-4 Male doctors are 40% more likely to commit suicide than other men, and female doctors are 130% more likely to do so than other women, according to a 2004 analysis in the American Journal of Psychiatry.5 With expanded access to care and new regulatory requirements under the Affordable Care Act increasing pressure on doctors, a …

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Measles in 2016

July 20, 2016
Measles in 2016

By Chio Yokose, MD

Peer Reviewed

On March 13, 2013, a young traveler returned home from London to our neighboring borough of Brooklyn, NY. Among this individual’s possessions was an active measles infection, one which subsequently led to one of the largest outbreaks of measles in the United States since 1996 .  The individual was an intentionally unvaccinated 17-year-old member of the Orthodox Jewish community in Brooklyn.  A total of 58 cases were eventually identified, and all of them were in the Brooklyn Orthodox Jewish …

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Shifting Paradigms in Cancer: Vaccines

January 22, 2015
Shifting Paradigms in Cancer: Vaccines

Joshua Horton

Peer Reviewed

We are not winning the war against cancer, if war is even an appropriate metaphor. When Richard Nixon signed the National Cancer Act into effect in 1971, many predicted that cancer would be a thing of the past within 5 years. It was likened to polio, smallpox, and other long-since-forgotten scourges of mankind; with appropriate funding and research, surely cancer, too, would vanish. With that act in 1971, the National Cancer Institute received a budget of $200 million, a figure that …

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Inhaled insulin: An Elusive Revolution in Diabetes Management.

June 19, 2014
Inhaled insulin: An Elusive Revolution in Diabetes Management.

By Reed Magleby, MD

Peer Reviewed

For many with type II diabetes, initiation of insulin therapy represents a devastating progression of their disease. Patients who are dependent on insulin require constant blood sugar monitoring, adherence to strict dosing algorithms, and up to 4 self-administered injections every day. According to a 2010 survey of non-insulin adherent diabetic patients, both “injection phobia” and inconvenience were found to be important barriers to initiation of insulin therapy. . In response to these concerns, less invasive administration techniques such as …

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Proton Pump Inhibitors: Acid Suppression with a Nutritional Cost

June 13, 2014
Proton Pump Inhibitors: Acid Suppression with a Nutritional Cost

By Dana Zalkin

Peer Reviewed

In the late 1970s evidence began to emerge that a newly discovered pump, a H+/K+ ATPase in the gastric mucosa, was the final step in the process of acid secretion . With this discovery, further research demonstrated the ability to reduce gastric acid secretion by inhibiting these proton pumps . We now have drugs that do just that: the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Proton pump inhibitors have been used since 1989 to treat acid-related gastrointestinal disorders as well as in …

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The Rise in Tick-Borne Diseases: Is Climate Change Responsible?

June 4, 2014
The Rise in Tick-Borne Diseases: Is Climate Change Responsible?

By Nadia Jafar

Peer Reviewed

As a resident of Connecticut, I grew up acutely aware of tick-borne diseases. Nonetheless, I was surprised to see at least 3 cases of tick-borne infections during the month of my Medicine clerkship. This drove me to research the incidence of tick-borne diseases, specifically in the US, and the possible factors contributing to their increased prevalence.

In 1998, the list of reportable tick-borne pathogens in the US included Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, Lyme disease, human granulocytic ehrlichiosis/anaplasmosis, and human …

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Gay Men, Barebacking and the New Little Blue Pill: The awkward interface of medicine and gay sex.

May 23, 2014
Gay Men, Barebacking and the New Little Blue Pill: The awkward interface of medicine and gay sex.

By Richard E. Greene, MD

Peer Reviewed

In July of 2012, the FDA approved the use of Tenofovir-Emtricitabine (Truvada, a single blue pill) daily as Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) in men with persistent risk for contracting HIV infection. The idea of PrEP has ignited a firestorm of concern among healthcare providers about how, when and in whom to use PrEP, if at all. Indeed, some believe that PrEP will usher in a new era of drug resistant new infections with HIV, or encourage men on prep …

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Infection Transmission During Air Travel

May 7, 2014
Infection Transmission During Air Travel

By Aaron Smith, MD

Peer Reviewed

It’s become a familiar site to travelers: airline passengers wearing respiratory masks to filter pathogens from the cabin air. To those not wearing masks, the fashion trend can be discomfiting. Are the mask-wearers paranoid or prudent? What is the probability of contracting an illness on an airplane? And how unique is the aircraft environment when it comes to disease transmission?

It is clear that due to lower air exchange rates and decreased sunlight, enclosed spaces such as buildings and …

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