Diseases 2.0

Creatine Kinase: How Much is Too Much?

November 3, 2010
Creatine Kinase: How Much is Too Much?

By Jon-Emile Kenny, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A 37-year-old man, with no past medical history and taking finasteride for male pattern baldness, is admitted to Medicine with profound lower extremity weakness after a weekend of performing multiple quadriceps exercises. His measured creatine phosphokinase (CPK) is over 35,000 IU/liter. I wonder to myself, what is the risk to his kidneys and can I mitigate the damage?

 Rhabdomyolysis means destruction of striated muscle. Physical manifestations range from an asymptomatic…

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Why Does Multiple Myeloma Treat The Kidneys So Poorly?

September 22, 2010
Why Does Multiple Myeloma Treat The Kidneys So Poorly?

By Jon Emile Kenny, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

“You mean I’ve got cancer and my kidneys are failing, doc?” said my frail patient on the Bellevue oncology service shortly after a medical student had told him that his kidneys were damaged. Indeed, his new diagnosis of multiple myeloma was accompanied by an admission creatinine of 2.5 mg/dL.

About a quarter of patients with multiple myeloma have renal insufficiency at diagnosis . There are a number of clinicopathologic…

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The Challenge of Measles Control

September 15, 2010
The Challenge of Measles Control

By Taher Modarressi

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Measles remains one of the leading causes of preventable child mortality worldwide, despite the development of an effective vaccine in the 1960s. Even as late as the early 1990s, measles continued to infect tens of millions of people and claimed over a million lives each year (51]. Although mortality dropped by 78% from 2000 to 2008 due to aggressive control initiatives, the disease is still responsible for 164,000 deaths annually . Morbidity…

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The Role of Serologic Testing in the Diagnosis of Celiac Disease

August 18, 2010
The Role of Serologic Testing in the Diagnosis of Celiac Disease

By Todd Cutler

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A 31-year-old woman presents to the clinic with chronic fatigue. She was diagnosed with iron  deficiency anemia when she was 25 years old and has since taken oral contraceptives to limit bleeding during menstruation which she describes as minimal. She has a family history significant for an older brother with celiac disease. She is thin and her exam is significant for conjunctival pallor. Her laboratory findings are significant for a hemoglobin of 9.7

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Chronic Stable Angina 2.0

August 4, 2010
Chronic Stable Angina 2.0

By Brad Pfeffer, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Case: A 75- year-old non-smoking male with a history of type II diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia comes to clinic with several months of stable anginal chest pain provoked by ten blocks of exercise with no change in exercise tolerance. He has seen you several times over the past year and has been placed on aspirin, beta blockers, calcium channel blockers and long acting nitrates with some relief of symptoms. In addition, he…

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Alzheimer’s Disease 2.0

May 12, 2010
Alzheimer’s Disease 2.0

Jeffrey Mayne MD

Faculty peer reviewed

Dr. Okonkwo’s post this past summer to PrimeCuts summarized ongoing research in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia affecting 15 million individuals worldwide and more than 5 million in the United States. It is a disease marked by cognitive deterioration that slowly breaks down one’s ability to perform activities of daily living and leaves individuals unable to care for themselves.

Briefly, the diagnosis of AD is based…

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Alzheimer’s Disease 2.0

April 21, 2010
Alzheimer’s Disease 2.0

Jeffery Mayne MD

Faculty peer reviewed

Dr. Okonkwo’s post this past summer to PrimeCuts summarized ongoing research in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia affecting 15 million individuals worldwide and more than 5 million in the United States. It is a disease marked by cognitive deterioration that slowly breaks down one’s ability to perform activities of daily living and leaves individuals unable to care for themselves.

Briefly, the diagnosis of AD is based on…

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Diseases 2.0: Rheumatoid Arthritis

September 18, 2009
Diseases 2.0: Rheumatoid Arthritis

Diseases 2.0 – Bringing you the latest updates on disease pathophysiology and treatment

Rachana Jani MD

Faculty peer reviewed

Rheumatoid arthritis is a well-recognized but enigmatic disease afflicting the lives of thousands of individuals each year. The mysterious nature of RA has become increasingly uncovered as research has mapped various pathways of cytokine production and interleukin activation. However, in practice, we use clinical criteria to diagnose RA and evaluate the effectiveness of these new therapies.Though soon to…

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Diseases 2.0: Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy (CUA)

August 26, 2009
Diseases 2.0: Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy (CUA)

Rebecca Hall MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Diseases 2.0 – Bringing you the latest updates on disease pathophysiology and treatment

Patient S.J. is a 36 year old female with a 20 year history of lupus and lupus nephritis now with end stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis. She presented with indurated, violaceous skin lesions with ulceration on both thighs. The lesions worsened and became increasingly painful over the last 6 months. Her extensive four month hospital course has…

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Diseases 2.0: Sepsis

February 5, 2009
Diseases 2.0: Sepsis

Diseases 2.0 – Bringing you the latest updates on disease pathophysiology and treatment

Commentary by Andrew McKinstry MD PGY-1

Faculty Peer Reviewed

For anyone who has stepped into an ICU, the septic patient is a familiar sight. Despite advances in research and management, including goal directed therapy and recombinant human activated protein C (Xigris), sepsis continues to be a major cause of mortality in the critical care setting, with an estimated 215,000 deaths annually, and costing roughly 16.7 billion dollars per year. Despite these staggering…

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Addiction 2.0 Part 2

September 4, 2008
Addiction 2.0 Part 2

Commentary by Joshua Lee MD, Ellie Grossman MD and Marc Gourevitch MD, NYU Division of General Internal Medicine

Please also see Part 1 of this series, posted last week

Alcohol treatment in primary care: evidence for effectiveness and neharmacotherapies

Brief interventions by primary care physicians to address unhealthy alcohol use have been shown in multiple studies and settings to promote reduced drinking and engagement in other treatment, although long-term impact on alcohol-related morbidity and mortality is not clear.(Saitz 2005) Standard brief intervention techniques are based…

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Addiction 2.0 Part 1

August 27, 2008
Addiction 2.0 Part 1

Commentary by Joshua Lee MD, Ellie Grossman MD and Marc Gourevitch MD, NYU Division of General Internal Medicine

Substance abuse remains a leading cause of disease and mortality in the US, yet it is rarely addressed in general practice settings. In the past, clinicians could point to a relative paucity of effective interventions by way of explaining their disengagement in the care of these medical disorders. In recent years, however, effective pharmacotherapies have emerged for two classes of substances that are particularly destructive when abused,…

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