Geriatrics

Barriers to Translating Evidence into Clinical Care: the Zoster Vaccine

October 10, 2013
Barriers to Translating Evidence into Clinical Care: the Zoster Vaccine

By Zachary Elkin

Faculty Peer Reviewed

There are more than a million cases of herpes zoster (HZ) in the US annually . The incidence of HZ, or shingles, has been rising in the US since the 1990s . One third of all people in the US will get HZ, with the highest incidence in people aged 50 to 79 . As a result of the Shingles Prevention Study (SPS), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved the…

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From The Archives – Evolution and Medicine: Why do we age?

July 19, 2012
From The Archives – Evolution and Medicine: Why do we age?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated January 30, 2010.

Mark D. Schwartz and Julia Hyland Bruno

Jeanne Calment rode her bicycle until age 100, quit smoking at 117, and died in 1977 at 122 years of age in Arles, France. This news-worthy story raises some questions: Why do we age at all? Why don’t we live forever? And many of us are asked by our patients, is old age a disease we can cure?

First, some useful distinctions: Aging is getting chronologically older,…

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Use it or Lose it- Do cognitive leisure activities protect against the development of Alzheimer’s?

March 30, 2012
Use it or Lose it- Do cognitive leisure activities protect against the development of Alzheimer’s?

By Courtney Cunningham, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

As the world population ages, enormous resources will be required to adequately care for persons suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. The disease is the fifth leading cause of death for adults aged 65 years and older, and is estimated to affect 1 in 8 persons in this age group. Despite recent advances, the cause of Alzheimer’s disease is not well understood. The FDA-approved medications in common use—donepezil (Aricept), galantamine (Razadyne), rivastigmine (Exelon), and memantine (Namenda)–help to manage symptoms; however…

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How Should You Approach a Geriatric Insomniac?

September 2, 2009
How Should You Approach a Geriatric Insomniac?

Gilda Boroumand, MS4

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Chronic insomnia, defined as difficulty with the initiation, maintenance, duration, and quality of sleep for at least one month, is a common complaint with significant impact on an individual’s daytime functioning and quality of life. It is particularly prevalent in the elderly, affecting between 23% to 34% of individuals over the age of 64. This same group is also more likely to experience adverse effects from various treatment regimens, thus leaving physicians with…

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Frailty- an emerging syndrome

August 21, 2008

Commentary by David Sutin MD, NYU Section 0f Geriatric Medicine

The Annual American Geriatric Society meeting, held May 2008, in Washington DC, was as usual fascinating. The meeting highlights included a lively discussion of the treatment of hypertension in the very elderly, and a talk on the emerging syndrome of frailty. Frailty was the selected subject for the Henderson State-of-the Art lecture, delivered by Dr Linda Fried, which I will summarize below.

The Syndrome of Frailty is characterized by at least 3 of…

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Old age and frailty: Biology and Socio-cultural Constructs

August 21, 2008
Old age and frailty: Biology and Socio-cultural Constructs

Commentary by Antonella Surbone MD PhD FACP, Department of Medicine, New York University Medical School, Clinical Correlations Ethics Section Editor

According to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report of April 14th, 2008, the elderly comprise 12% of the U.S. population, and their number is projected to almost double between 2005 and 2030, from 37 million to 70 million. The elderly currently account for more than one third of all hospital stays and of prescriptions, and more than a fourth of all office visits…

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