Tales of Survival

Tales of the Bellevue Hospital Internal Medicine House Staff from the ‘60s to Now

October 20, 2017
Tales of the Bellevue Hospital Internal Medicine House Staff from the ‘60s to Now

In honor of the 10th Anniversary of Clinical Correlations over the next four weeks we are presenting a wonderful 4 part series of life as a house officer at Bellevue Hospital in the 60’s, 70’s, 80’s and 90’s.   Former resident Olivia Begasse de Dhaem conducted extensive interviews with our faculty who worked at Bellevue in each of these decades.   With guidance from David Oshinksy, Olivia has written a story of what binds our students, residents and faculty and patients together through Bellevue’s rich history.  While …

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Tales of Survival: Fighting Words

August 11, 2017
Tales of Survival:  Fighting Words

By Rachael Winchester-Hayes, MD

Political friends and foes alike were shocked last month when Senator John McCain’s office announced his diagnosis of glioblastoma after what was thought to be a minor surgery for removal of a blood clot. Watching the reactions unfold on social media, I was struck not just by the bipartisan showing of support – perhaps the first bipartisan action since the election – but also by the combative language used in the tweets, Facebook posts and even official statements.  The White House …

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Tales of Survival-The Physician’s Stages of Grief (Based upon the Kübler-Ross Model)

August 4, 2017
Tales of Survival-The Physician’s Stages of Grief (Based upon the Kübler-Ross Model)

By Lauren M. Young

Prologue/Narrowing a Diagnosis.  A 61 year-old African American male, with a longstanding history of right knee and lower back pain, presented to the Emergency Department for the fourth time in one month complaining of pain on the right side of his lower back.  He had also fallen – remarkably not the ‘chief complaint’ for this well-muscled, vibrant man who could “walk from Harlem to Coney Island” just a few weeks prior.  He was surprised when recently his knees “just buckled” …

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Tales of Survival: Bellevue Night Float Routine

May 5, 2017
Tales of Survival: Bellevue Night Float Routine

By Olivia Begasse de Dhaem MD, Palak Patel MD, Shreya Trivedi MD

Peer Reviewed

Hypotension in a patient with a pericardial effusion, sustained tachycardia in a post-MI patient, hypoxia in a patient with metastatic cancer… the Bellevue night float intern pager can get frantic. After trial and error, our group of interns have come up with a cohesive routine to balance the strain that night float forces on our circadian rhythms, eating habits, work pattern, and social life. Given the paucity of information on night …

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Gratitude: Benefits for the Soul, and the Body

February 3, 2017
Gratitude: Benefits for the Soul, and the Body

By Nicole Van Groningen, MD

Peer Reviewed

Although the “stress of the holidays” is a phrase used to refer to the multitude of to-do lists and travel obligations associated with the 6-week stretch between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day, the pleasant emotional state associated with the season remains one of the most important positive influences on the American psyche. Chief among these warm emotions is an emphasis on gratitude for the people, relationships, opportunities, and circumstances we cherish. As the holiday season comes to a …

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Glucagon People/Insulin People

November 23, 2016
Glucagon People/Insulin People

By Michael Tanner, MD

Glucagon: a 29-amino-acid polypeptide secreted by the alpha cells of the pancreas in response to hypoglycemia or starvation. 

Insulin: a 51-amino-acid polypeptide secreted by the beta cells of the pancreas in response to nutrient consumption. 

It’s December 13th, 1932, Camden, New Jersey. You are playing alto sax and clarinet in the reed section of Bennie Moten’s Kansas City Orchestra. It’s the low point of the Depression, and your boss is feeling it: the financial challenges of running a …

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Wedge

October 7, 2016
Wedge

By Kyra Edson

Peer Reviewed

Wedges are triangular tools that have traditionally been used to split wood along the grain. The mechanical advantage of a wedge is its ability to accomplish this split with less force and less waste of material. Its tapered end is snugly secured inside a small defect, and then a force is applied in order to separate a piece of wood neatly and precisely.

As a medical student at the Manhattan Veterans Affairs hospital, I witnessed this powerful tool wreak havoc …

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More Than A Medical Note

July 15, 2016
More Than A Medical Note

By Alicia Cowley, MD

Ms. R had been admitted late the previous night so I expected that I would have to gently nudge her from her sleep. So as I peeked around the curtain separating her bed from her roommate’s, I was surprised to find a woman alert and freshly bathed. She had assembled a makeshift vanity with a mirror and a small cosmetics pouch that she had propped conspicuously atop her overbed table.

She was about to apply some lipstick when she noticed me. …

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