Nutrition

Should I Add Sugar or Splenda to My Coffee?

June 6, 2013
Should I Add Sugar or Splenda to My Coffee?

By Reda Issa

Faculty Peer Reviewed

As a medical student, I adjusted to waking up at 6 AM every day – with the help of coffee, of course. Living in New York City and its fast-paced routine requires that extra kick those beans provide. So, should I add sugar or Splenda to my coffee? Half a century ago this question did not exist, but obesity was not a word in the Merriam-Webster then. Today, we have to think more carefully.

Non-sucrose based sweeteners can be …

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Have a Cow? How Recent Studies on Red Meat Consumption Apply to Clinical Practice

April 12, 2013
Have a Cow? How Recent Studies on Red Meat Consumption Apply to Clinical Practice

By Tyler R. McClintock

Faculty Peer Reviewed

“Red Meat Kills.” “Red Meat a Ticket to Early Grave.” “A Hot Dog a Day Raises Risk of Dying.” Such were the headlines circulating in popular press last year when the Annals of Internal Medicine released details of an upcoming article out of Frank Hu’s research group at the Harvard School of Public Health . Analyzing long-term prospective data from two large cohort studies, researchers found that individuals who ate a serving of unprocessed red meat each day …

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Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Atherosclerosis

August 17, 2012
Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Atherosclerosis

By Michael Malone

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been popularized in recent years as beneficial nutrients with cardioprotective effects. Omega-3 PUFAs are so named because of a double bond between the 3rd and 4th carbon of the polycarbon chain. They are “poly-unsaturated” with hydrogen atoms, as their carbon chains contain multiple double bonds. Three omega-3 long chain PUFAs are typically discussed in the context of medical therapy, the first being alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). ALA is an essential precursor omega-3 …

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Is There a Long-Term Mortality Benefit From Bariatric Surgery?

March 8, 2012
Is There a Long-Term Mortality Benefit From Bariatric Surgery?

By Marc O’Donnell

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Obesity is defined as a body mass index (BMI) of ?30 kg/m2. The rate of obesity in the United States has skyrocketed over the last several decades, becoming a disease of epidemic proportions. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2009, 32 states had a prevalence of obesity of ?25%, while 9 of these states had a prevalence of ?30%. It has been estimated that the economic costs of treating obesity and its complications, including type …

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Obesity 2.0: More Than Just the Extra Weight

February 9, 2012
Obesity 2.0: More Than Just the Extra Weight

By Aviva Regev

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Introduction

Few people these days are unaware of the “obesity epidemic,” with its inception here in the United States and its steady, insidious spread around the globe. The numbers are truly staggering: in 2008, the World Health Organization estimated that 1.5 billion adults–over 20% of the earth’s population–were overweight, and 500 million of those were classified as obese, with a body mass index greater than 30. In the United States, over a third of the population is overweight, and …

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Myths and Realities: The Fishy Truth about Mercury Toxicity

December 17, 2011
Myths and Realities: The Fishy Truth about Mercury Toxicity

By Nicole Learned

Faculty Peer Reviewed

In an age when patients obtain medical news from the media, and celebrities initiate powerful health trends, clinicians have to be prepared to answer even the most obscure questions about health and nutrition. When Entourage star Jeremy Piven took a leave of absence in 2008 from the Broadway play Speed the Plow due to alleged mercury poisoning from eating sushi twice a day for years, it raised the question: How much fish is too much?

Where Does Mercury Come …

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Does Cranberry Juice Prevent Urinary Tract Infections?

November 9, 2011
Does Cranberry Juice Prevent Urinary Tract Infections?

By Jessie Yu

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A healthy 21-year-old female college student presents to clinic after one day of dysuria and increased frequency. You diagnose her with a recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), and as you hand her a prescription for empiric antibiotic treatment, she asks you if drinking cranberry juice will prevent these in the future…

Drinking cranberry juice to prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs) has been a traditional folk remedy for hundreds of years. Stroll into any New York City pharmacy and you …

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Do Soft Drinks Cause Hypertension?

July 8, 2011
Do Soft Drinks Cause Hypertension?

By Ivan Saraiva, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Sugared soft drinks are among the most heavily consumed drinks in the US. Carbonated soft drinks were first invented as a way to make “healthier” water that looked like natural carbonated waters that were found in European spas in the mountains. The name soda came from the use of bicarbonate of soda, which was used to produce carbonation (for an excellent review of the history of beverages, refer to Wolf et al..  Unfortunately, we no longer realize any …

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