From the Archives

From the Archives: The Complicated Story of Saturated Fat

January 11, 2018
From the Archives: The Complicated Story of Saturated Fat

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated November 8, 2013

By Gregory Katz, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Everyday in clinic, we tell our patients to choose foods low in saturated fat. Because these foods raise plasma cholesterol, the thinking goes, they cause heart disease. Today, every major medical organization – from the American Heart Association to the Harvard School of Public Health to the USDA  – recommends a diet low in saturated fat to prevent and treat heart disease. The fat-cholesterol-heart disease connection …

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From the Archives: Corticosteroids and Prophylaxis. What complications should you try to prevent in patients on chronic corticosteroids?

December 7, 2017
From the Archives: Corticosteroids and Prophylaxis. What complications should you try to prevent in patients on chronic corticosteroids?

 

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated October 30, 2013

By Robert Joseph Fakheri, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A 55 year-old male is recently diagnosed with systemic sarcoidosis. The patient is started on prednisone 40mg with the plan to decrease the dose after remission of symptoms, which may take a number of months. What kind of prophylaxis should the patient receive?

Corticosteroids are an effective treatment option for a number of diseases spanning many specialties. However, long-term corticosteroid treatment is marred with a …

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From The Archives -The DLO: Does FFP Correct INR?

October 5, 2017
From The Archives -The DLO: Does FFP Correct INR?

Please enjoy this post from the archives date September 20, 2013

By Nicole A Lamparello, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Page from the hematology laboratory: critical lab value; INR 1.9. Liver biopsy scheduled for tomorrow. What is a knowledgeable physician practicing evidence-based medicine to do?

Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is the liquid, acellular component of blood. FFP contains water, electrolytes, and the majority of the coagulation proteins . It is frequently transfused to patients with an elevated prothrombin time (PT), a measure of the activity of …

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From the Archives: Does Running Cause Knee Osteoarthritis?

September 15, 2017
From the Archives: Does Running Cause Knee Osteoarthritis?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated September 14, 2013

By Karin Katz, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Post-summer is here. Despite the heat and what feels like 100% humidity, the East River Path is packed with runners. No amount of car fumes pouring onto the path could stop those in training. Others are circling the 6-mile-loop around Central Park. Or, if you are bored of running the typical routes, for a few Saturdays, Park Avenue will be shut down for automobile traffic. New Yorkers …

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Health Care: Do Celebrities Know Best?

August 24, 2017
Health Care: Do Celebrities Know Best?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated August 25, 2013

By Emma Gorynski

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The power that celebrities have over Americans is undeniable. We look to them for guidance on what to listen to, what to wear, and even what to name our children. Celebrities even affect the decisions we make about our own health care. With the increasing popularity of direct-to-consumer advertising, celebrities are promoting pharmaceuticals and other health-related products.

Is there a role for celebrities in health advocacy? On one …

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From the Archives: Are We Too Hesitant to Anticoagulate Elderly Patients with Atrial Fibrillation? A Risk-Benefit Analysis

August 17, 2017
From the Archives: Are We Too Hesitant to Anticoagulate Elderly Patients with Atrial Fibrillation? A Risk-Benefit Analysis

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated June 28, 2013

By Sunny N. Shah, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Background:

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia and its prevalence increases with age. In fact, the lifetime incidence of AF is approximately 25% in individuals by age 80, with the incidence nearly doubling with each decade of life after age 50. (1) Multiple randomized controlled trials have shown that oral antithrombotic therapy with warfarin or aspirin decreases the risk of ischemic stroke in …

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From the Archives: Decoding the APOL1 Kidney

May 4, 2017
From the Archives: Decoding the APOL1 Kidney

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated September 25, 2013

By Areeba Sadiq

Faculty Peer Reviewed

African American patients have a higher risk of developing end-stage renal disease (ESRD) than their Caucasian counterparts . If over the age of 70, that risk is 3 times higher. If between the ages of 60-69, the risk is 8 times higher. And, if between 30 and 39, African American patients are an astounding 11 times more likely to develop ESRD . Why are African Americans more likely …

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From the Archives: Did Abraham Lincoln Have Marfan Syndrome?

April 13, 2017
From the Archives: Did Abraham Lincoln Have Marfan Syndrome?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated April 19, 2013

By Anna Krigel Faculty Peer Reviewed The iconic image of Abraham Lincoln is ubiquitous in our lives, from his small face on the penny to his large figure looming over the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Lincoln fascinates historians because of his significant role in American history when our nation was bitterly divided, but he intrigues physicians because of his remarkable stature. A reporter once described the 16th president as a “tall, lank, lean…

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