From the Archives

From The Archives: In Search of a Competitive Advantage: A Primer for the Clinician Treating the Anabolic Steroid User

November 10, 2016
From The Archives: In Search of a Competitive Advantage: A Primer for the Clinician Treating the Anabolic Steroid User

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated April 17, 2013

By David G. Rosenthal and Robert Gianotti, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Case: A 33-year-old man comes to your clinic complaining of worsening acne over the last 6 months. You note a significant increase in both BMI and bicep circumference. After several minutes of denial, he reveals that he has been using both injectable and oral anabolic steroids. He receives these drugs from a local supplier and via the Internet. He confides that his libido …

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From The Archives: The Effect of Bariatric Surgery on Incretin Hormones and Glucose Homeostasis

October 13, 2016
From The Archives: The Effect of Bariatric Surgery on Incretin Hormones and Glucose Homeostasis

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated April 4, 2013

By Michael Crist

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Until recently, little thought was given to the important role played by the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum in glucose homeostasis. The involvement of the gut in glucose regulation is mediated by the enteroinsular axis, which refers to the neural and hormonal signaling pathways that connect the gastrointestinal (GI) tract with pancreatic beta cells. These pathways are largely responsible for the increase in insulin that occurs during the postprandial …

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From The Archives: Have a Cow? How Recent Studies on Red Meat Consumption Apply to Clinical Practice

October 6, 2016
From The Archives: Have a Cow? How Recent Studies on Red Meat Consumption Apply to Clinical Practice

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated, April 12, 2013

By Tyler R. McClintock

Faculty Peer Reviewed

“Red Meat Kills.” “Red Meat a Ticket to Early Grave.” “A Hot Dog a Day Raises Risk of Dying.” Such were the headlines circulating in popular press last year when the Annals of Internal Medicine released details of an upcoming article out of Frank Hu’s research group at the Harvard School of Public Health . Analyzing long-term prospective data from two large cohort studies, researchers found that …

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From The Archives – White Coat Hypertension: Are Doctors Bad for Your Blood Pressure?

September 29, 2016
From The Archives – White Coat Hypertension: Are Doctors Bad for Your Blood Pressure?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated March 20, 2013

By Lauren Foster

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Hypertension is a pervasive chronic disease affecting approximately 65 million adults in the United States, and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality . Antihypertensives are widely prescribed due to their effectiveness in lowering blood pressure, thereby reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. However, the phenomenon of the “white coat effect” may be a complicating factor in the diagnosis and management of hypertensive patients. It is well established …

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From The Archives: Reflections on Hurricane Sandy

September 22, 2016
From The Archives: Reflections on Hurricane Sandy

Please enjoy this post from the archives, dated, January 11, 2013

By Jessica Taff, MD

As the 3 major teaching hospitals that make up NYU Medical Center begin to come back online, we thought it was the right time to share some of our reflections on Hurricane Sandy.  It’s been a long strange journey for the faculty, housestaff, students and most of all our patients.  It’s time now though for us to come back home; to return with a renewed sense of purpose and a …

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From the Archives: Morgellons-Real Disease or Delusion Turned Internet Meme?

August 12, 2016
From the Archives: Morgellons-Real Disease or Delusion Turned Internet Meme?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated October 3, 2012

By Robert Mazgaj

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Morgellons disease is an “unexplained dermopathy” characterized by fibers emerging from skin lesions, and associated with various cutaneous sensations. Inspired by a curious medical condition reported by a 17th century English physician, Morgellons was actually named in 2002 by Mary Leitao, a layperson, to describe the mysterious set of symptoms reportedly suffered by her then 2-year-old son. Leitao then launched the not-for-profit Morgellons Research Foundation (MRF) along with …

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From The Archives – Fractional Excretion of Sodium (FENa): Diagnostic Godsend or Gimmick?

July 22, 2016
From The Archives – Fractional Excretion of Sodium (FENa): Diagnostic Godsend or Gimmick?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated September 5, 2012

By Jon-Emile S Kenny, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A 62- year-old man with a history of hypertension, diastolic dysfunction and chronic kidney disease is admitted 4 days after beginning outpatient treatment of community acquired pneumonia with cefpodoxime and azithromycin; he had been intermittently vomiting for two days, but proudly states that he has been keeping all of his home medications down, including hydrochlorothiazide. The morning after his admission, he was noted to have a …

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Does Stress Cause Stress Ulcers? The Etiology and Pathophysiology of Stress Ulcers

July 14, 2016
Does Stress Cause Stress Ulcers? The Etiology and Pathophysiology of Stress Ulcers

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated August 22, 2012

Sara-Megumi Naylor, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

When Warren and Marshall were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2005 for their work on Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease , a long-standing controversy concerning the major cause of peptic ulcers was settled. They are not due to the reasons—spicy food, excessive coffee consumption, poor sleep, a stressful lifestyle—that we have heard from relatives and perhaps believed over the years. It is now …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

July 11, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Amar Parikh, MD

Peer Reviewed

Just days after the United States celebrated its 240th birthday, the nation was devastated by the tragic deaths of two young black men and five Dallas police officers amidst the country’s ongoing struggle over race relations. Alton Sterling was shot to death in Baton Rouge, Louisiana during an encounter with two police officers, while Philando Castile was killed in Falcon Heights, Minnesota during a routine stop for a broken taillight. The grisly footage of both their deaths was widely …

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From the Archives: Myth vs. Reality: The July Effect

July 7, 2016
From the Archives: Myth vs. Reality: The July Effect

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated August 12, 2012

By Mark Adelman, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Another July 1st has come and gone, marking the yearly transition in US graduate medical education of interns to junior residents, junior residents to senior residents, and senior residents to fellows. With this annual mid-summer mass influx of nearly 37,000 interns and other trainees taking on new clinical responsibilities, learning to use different electronic medical record systems and navigating the other idiosyncrasies of unfamiliar institutions, one …

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From The Archives – Medicine’s Favorite Default Diagnosis: Non-compliance

June 23, 2016
From The Archives – Medicine’s Favorite Default Diagnosis: Non-compliance

Please enjoy this post from the archives, dated August 2, 2012

By Robert Keller

Faculty Peer Reviewed

In a small examination room on the Ambulatory Care floor of a large hospital in Brooklyn, I greet Ms. S, a 53-year-old Jamaican woman, as she walks through the door and plops herself down in the chair across from me. Having spent 20 minutes perusing her chart, I know that she suffers from morbid obesity, uncontrolled hypertension (blood pressure 165/95), and terrible diabetes (A1c 13.8%). I have already …

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From The Archives: Is a VBG just as good as an ABG?

May 6, 2016
From The Archives: Is a VBG just as good as an ABG?

Please enjoy this post from the archives, dated July 13, 2012

By Sunnie Kim, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A rapid response is called overhead. As white-coated residents rush to the patient’s bedside, the medical consult starts to shout out orders to organize the chaos. “What’s the one-liner?” “Whose patient is this?” And of course, “Who’s drawing the labs?” Usually, at this point, the intern proceeds to collect the butterfly needle, assorted colored tubes, and the arterial blood gas (ABG) syringe. If lucky, there’s a strong …

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