From the Archives

From The Archives – Medicine’s Favorite Default Diagnosis: Non-compliance

June 23, 2016
From The Archives – Medicine’s Favorite Default Diagnosis: Non-compliance

Please enjoy this post from the archives, dated August 2, 2012

By Robert Keller

Faculty Peer Reviewed

In a small examination room on the Ambulatory Care floor of a large hospital in Brooklyn, I greet Ms. S, a 53-year-old Jamaican woman, as she walks through the door and plops herself down in the chair across from me. Having spent 20 minutes perusing her chart, I know that she suffers from morbid obesity, uncontrolled hypertension (blood pressure 165/95), and terrible diabetes (A1c 13.8%). I have already …

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From The Archives: Is a VBG just as good as an ABG?

May 6, 2016
From The Archives: Is a VBG just as good as an ABG?

Please enjoy this post from the archives, dated July 13, 2012

By Sunnie Kim, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A rapid response is called overhead. As white-coated residents rush to the patient’s bedside, the medical consult starts to shout out orders to organize the chaos. “What’s the one-liner?” “Whose patient is this?” And of course, “Who’s drawing the labs?” Usually, at this point, the intern proceeds to collect the butterfly needle, assorted colored tubes, and the arterial blood gas (ABG) syringe. If lucky, there’s a strong …

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From The Archives: Should Patients With Nephrotic Syndrome Receive Anticoagulation?

March 31, 2016
From The Archives: Should Patients With Nephrotic Syndrome Receive Anticoagulation?

Please enjoy this post from the Archives dated May 9, 2012 By Jennifer Mulliken

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Case 1:

A 30-year-old African-American male with a history of bilateral pulmonary emboli presents with a 1-week history of bilateral lower extremity edema. Blood pressure is 138/83, cholesterol 385, LDL 250, albumin 2.9. Urinalysis shows 3+ protein. Twenty-four hour urinary protein is 7.2 grams.

Case 2:

A 47-year-old Hispanic male with a history of mild hypertension and venous insufficiency presents with a 3-month history of bilateral lower extremity …

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The Placebo Effect: Can Understanding Its Role Improve Patient Care?

February 25, 2016
The Placebo Effect: Can Understanding Its Role Improve Patient Care?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated March 4, 2012

By Brian D. Clark

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The ability to critically assess the validity of a clinical trial is one of many important skills that a physician strives to develop. This skill helps guide clinical decision-making, and there are a number of things that we are trained to look for to help determine the validity of any given study. Right at the top of the list of factors that go into this appraisal is …

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From The Archives: Nothing QT (Cute) about it: rethinking the use of the QT interval to evaluate risk of drug induced arrhythmias

February 4, 2016
From The Archives: Nothing QT (Cute) about it: rethinking the use of the QT interval to evaluate risk of drug induced arrhythmias

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated April 27, 2012

By Aneesh Bapat, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Perhaps it’s the French name, the curvaceous appearance on electrocardiogram (EKG), or its elusive and mysterious nature, but Torsades des pointes, a polymorphic ventricular arrhythmia, is certainly the sexiest of all ventricular arrhythmias. Very few physicians and scientists can explain its origin in an early afterdepolarization (EAD), and fewer still can explain its “twisting of the points” morphology on EKG. Despite its rare occurrence (only 761 cases …

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From The Archives: Medical Etymology: The Origins of Our Language

January 21, 2016
From The Archives: Medical Etymology: The Origins of Our Language

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated March 28, 2012

By Robert Gianotti , MD, Todd Cutler, MD and Patrick Cocks, MD

Welcome. We are proud to present the first installment of a new section dedicated to exploring the roots of common medical terminology. We hope this will give you a chance to incorporate a historical perspective into your daily practice and to reflect on the rich and often unexpected stories lying at the heart of our profession. This is our ode to the …

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From The Archives: Does the BCG Vaccine Really Work?

October 1, 2015
From The Archives: Does the BCG Vaccine Really Work?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated March 14, 2012

By Mitchell Kim

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an acid-fast bacillus, is the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), an infection that causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. A highly contagious infection, TB is spread by aerosolized pulmonary droplet nuclei containing the infective organism. Most infections manifest as pulmonary disease, but TB is also known to cause meningitis, vertebral osteomyelitis, and other systemic diseases through hematogenous dissemination. In 2009, there were an estimated 9.4 million …

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From the Archives: Myth vs. Reality: The July Effect

July 1, 2015
From the Archives: Myth vs. Reality: The July Effect

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated August 12, 2012

By Mark Adelman, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Another July 1st has come and gone, marking the yearly transition in US graduate medical education of interns to junior residents, junior residents to senior residents, and senior residents to fellows. With this annual mid-summer mass influx of nearly 37,000 interns and other trainees taking on new clinical responsibilities, learning to use different electronic medical record systems and navigating the other idiosyncrasies of unfamiliar institutions, one …

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FROM THE ARCHIVES – Cardiac Murmur Websites: An Internet Review of Common Cardiac Auscultation Websites

June 11, 2015
FROM THE ARCHIVES – Cardiac Murmur Websites: An Internet Review of Common Cardiac Auscultation Websites

Please enjoy this Post from the archives dated February 29, 2012

By Rachel Bond, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

In the field of medicine including the art of physical diagnosis, there is nothing more nerve provoking then having to master the art of cardiac auscultation. Imagine the concern of medical students, residents, internists and freshly starting cardiologists all alike who are asked by patients time and time again, “does my heart sound okay?!” With the advancement in technology and the rapid surge of echocardiogram usage, the …

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From The Archives – EKG Websites: A Review of the Most Viewed Websites

March 25, 2015
From The Archives – EKG Websites: A Review of the Most Viewed Websites

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated February 3, 2012

By Melissa Mroz, MD and Rachel Bond, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The electrocardiogram (EKG) is a test not only interpreted by cardiologists.

In fact, it is usually early in the year that the new medical student is handed an EKG; top flipped down as not to “cheat” and asked to interpret the rhythmic black squiggles on red graph paper. I still remember the anxiety provoking questions asked on my Medicine Clerkship. As with many …

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From The Archives: To Premed or Not to Premed: Are Tylenol and Benadryl Really Necessary Prior to All Transfusions?

January 14, 2015
From The Archives: To Premed or Not to Premed: Are Tylenol and Benadryl Really Necessary Prior to All Transfusions?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated January 19, 2012

By Robert Gianotti, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Case: Mr. T is a 32-year-old male being treated by the oncology service for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia. You are the night float intern covering overnight when you are called by the nurse to inform you that his CMV negative platelets have finally arrived from the blood bank. The nurse notices that the day team has not ordered Benadryl or Tylenol to be given prior to the transfusion, …

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From The Archives: Why Are Asthma Patients Noncompliant With Their Inhalers?

January 8, 2015
From The Archives: Why Are Asthma Patients Noncompliant With Their Inhalers?

Please enjoy this post from the archives, dated January 11, 2012

By Kristen Mattei

Faculty Peer Reviewed

I distinctly remember being 9 years old, sitting in my doctor’s office after a cold left me struggling for breath, doubled over and wheezing, when he told me that I had asthma. At first I didn’t believe the diagnosis, despite the fact that the albuterol inhaler he had given me was like a breath of life after running suicides on the soccer field. I wasn’t sick or weak! …

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