From the Archives

From The Archives – Evolution and Medicine: Why do we age?

July 19, 2012
From The Archives – Evolution and Medicine: Why do we age?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated January 30, 2010.

Mark D. Schwartz and Julia Hyland Bruno

Jeanne Calment rode her bicycle until age 100, quit smoking at 117, and died in 1977 at 122 years of age in Arles, France. This news-worthy story raises some questions: Why do we age at all? Why don’t we live forever? And many of us are asked by our patients, is old age a disease we can cure?

First, some useful distinctions: Aging is getting chronologically older,…

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From The Archives: The Ethics of Electronic Health Records

June 21, 2012
From The Archives: The Ethics of Electronic Health Records

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated January 15, 2010

John J. Mercuri

Faculty peer reviewed

Introduction
The 111th Congress allocated $19 billion of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 toward the creation of an electronic health record (EHR) for each person in the United States by 2014.(1) The recent debate over EHRs has focused largely on the economic, logistical, and political consequences of implementing such a system; however, the country should also contemplate the ethical ramifications of EHRs. Addressing these concerns…

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From The Archives: How Does Alcohol Cause Cardiomyopathy?

April 19, 2012
From The Archives: How Does Alcohol Cause Cardiomyopathy?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated November 4, 2009

Charles Levine

Faculty peer reviewed

Excessive consumption of ethanol (EtOH) has many deleterious effects on the human body. The heart is a target of damage from EtOH consumption, as chronic consumption of EtOH leads to decreased cardiac function and structural heart disease, including dilated cardiomyopathy.(1) The exact mechanism by which EtOH exerts its deleterious effects on the heart remains poorly understood and is an area of active…

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From The Archives: How to interpret troponins in renal disease?

March 15, 2012
From The Archives: How to interpret troponins in renal disease?

Please enjoy this post from the archives first posted on October 21, 2009.

By Ivan Saraiva MD

Case: A 68-year-old man, with a history of stable angina and end-stage renal disease treated by hemodialysis for the past three years, presents to the hospital with leg swelling and shortness of breath. He also complains of intermittent chest pain unrelated to exertion. Physical exam reveals bilateral pitting lower extremity edema, pulmonary crackles, and an elevated jugular venous pressure. Initial electrocardiogram is notable for some nonspecific repolarization abnormalities.…

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From The Archives: Myths and Realities: Colon Cleansing: Healthful or just a load of @$%!

January 26, 2012
From The Archives: Myths and Realities: Colon Cleansing: Healthful or just a load of @$%!

Please enjoy this post from the archives on July 16, 2009

By Chau Che MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

You’ll have increased energy, radiant skin, reduced joint pain, improved asthma symptoms, and best of all…you will lose weight. These are some of the purported benefits of removing “toxins” (otherwise known as undigested material) from the colon through cleansing. As with fashion, music, and art, what’s old has a way of becoming trendy again…especially when celebrities such as Beyonce talk about it on the Oprah Winfrey show.…

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From The Archives: Why is Syphilis Still Sensitive to Penicillin?

January 13, 2012
From The Archives: Why is Syphilis Still Sensitive to Penicillin?

Please enjoy this post from the Archives, first published on July 30, 2009

By Sam Rougas MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

It seems that every week a new article in a major newspaper is reporting what most infectious disease physicians have been preaching for several years. Antibiotic resistance is rapidly spreading. Infections such as Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcal Aureus, Extremely Drug Resistant Tuberculosis, and Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus have journeyed from the intensive care units to the locker rooms of the National Football League. That being said, some…

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Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Premature Coronary Artery Disease

July 14, 2011
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Premature Coronary Artery Disease

Please enjoy this post from the Clinical Correlations archives first posted June 17, 2009

Ishmeal  Bradley MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Ms. W is a 35 yo woman with a history of systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosed 10 years ago. Her only medications are hydroxychloroquine and prednisone for occasional disease flares. She is otherwise healthy. She has no known personal or family history of cardiac disease or stroke, but does smoke ½ pack of cigarettes per day. Currently, she denies any chest pain, shortness of breath, urinary…

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From the Archives: Myths and Realities: Is Breakfast the Most Important Meal of the Day?

May 26, 2011
From the Archives: Myths and Realities: Is Breakfast the Most Important Meal of the Day?

Please enjoy this post from the Clinical Correlations archives first posted June 18, 2009

By Chau Che MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

In an age when two thirds of adults are either overweight or obese and obesity rates in children continue to rise, would an intervention such as consuming breakfast daily help combat this problem? Skipping breakfast has become increasingly common in adults and adolescents in the United States, with the proportion of adults and children skipping breakfast…

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From The Archives: Myths and Realities: Do Power Lines Cause Cancer?

April 14, 2011
From The Archives: Myths and Realities: Do Power Lines Cause Cancer?

Please enjoy this post from the Clinical Correlations archives first posted May 20, 2009

By Aditya Mattoo, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Prompted by personal experience, I thought I would explore the alleged causative role of power lines in hematologic malignancies for the next installment of Myths and Realities. In recent years, two close family friends living at separate locations but in homes adjacent to lots with electrical transformers were diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma and Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.…

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From The Archives: Does Acetazolamide Prevent Altitude Sickness?

March 31, 2011
From The Archives: Does Acetazolamide Prevent Altitude Sickness?

Please enjoy this post from the Clinical Correlations archives first posted May 7, 2009

Seema Pursnani, MD

Because your parents have designated you as the family doctor, your Uncle Joe calls to ask you if he should take this medication called Diamox before going trekking in the Himalayas. You work at Bellevue in New York City: who climbs mountains here? What do you say?

Why do illnesses develop from changes in altitude?

The essential culprit…

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From The Archives: The Skinny on Cachexia…Can it be Treated?

March 24, 2011
From The Archives: The Skinny on Cachexia…Can it be Treated?

Please enjoy this post from the Clinical Correlations archives first posted April 22, 2009

Michael T. Tees, MD, MPH

On the wards and in the clinic, the physician is frequently presented with a patient with a decreased appetite and alarming weight loss. The patient is likely frustrated with their own fraility, the family is upset at the poor nutritional state of their loved one, but the healthcare provider should be the most concerned. This clinical presentation without…

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From The Archives – Deciphering Fact from Fiction in Hypoglycemia

January 6, 2011
From The Archives – Deciphering Fact from Fiction in Hypoglycemia

Please enjoy this post from the Clinical Correlations archives first posted March 26, 2009

By: Melissa Price, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A 42 year-old male phlebotomist with a history of anxiety presented to the emergency room complaining of four hours of dizziness and diaphoresis. He denied taking any medications. His vitals were stable, his physical exam was significant for a lethargic, diaphoretic young man without focal findings, and his fingerstick value was 43mg/dL. His chest X-ray, EKG, and laboratory…

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