Cardiology

When Clopidogrel Fails…

March 10, 2010
When Clopidogrel Fails…

Marisa Mizus

Faculty peer reviewed

Clopidogrel (Plavix) has been the standard of care for patients with coronary artery disease following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for the past decade.  Although it is a successful antiplatelet treatment in many patients, like any hero, it has a weakness: formation of its active metabolite depends on two hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-dependent steps.  Clopidogrel resistance, or non-response, is correlated with an increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events, including reinfarction and stent thrombosis.(1)  It is often unclear why a patient …

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When Minutes Matter: Why Do Patients Wait to Seek Treatment Following a Stroke or Heart Attack?

March 3, 2010
When Minutes Matter: Why Do Patients Wait to Seek Treatment Following a Stroke or Heart Attack?

Laurel Geraghty

Faculty peer reviewed

Both stroke and heart attack require rapid treatment following the onset of symptoms to minimize morbidity and mortality, but few patients seek help in a timely manner. Only about half of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or stroke arrive to the emergency department within four hours of the onset of symptoms.,,, Every 30-minute delay in treatment following AMI increases one-year mortality by 7.5%, and almost half of the 167,000 annual stroke deaths in this country occur before the patient …

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Meeting Perspectives: American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2009

December 16, 2009
Meeting Perspectives: American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2009

Steven Sedlis, MD

 

The annual scientific session of the American Heart Association (AHA) was held in Orlando on November 14-18 2009. It felt like a ghost town. I ran into Ira Schulman, my medicine resident at Bellevue when I was a third year medical student; we looked at one another and simultaneously blurted out “where is everybody?” Well Ira remains my role model and hero and it goes to show that although attendance at major medical meetings may wax and wane, the impact of a …

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How Does Alcohol Cause Cardiomyopathy?

November 4, 2009
How Does Alcohol Cause Cardiomyopathy?

Charles Levine

Faculty peer reviewed

Excessive consumption of ethanol (EtOH) has many deleterious effects on the human body. The heart is a target of damage from EtOH consumption, as chronic consumption of EtOH leads to decreased cardiac function and structural heart disease, including dilated cardiomyopathy.(1) The exact mechanism by which EtOH exerts its deleterious effects on the heart remains poorly understood and is an area of active research. This report will focus on some of the proposed mechanisms and some recent advances in the understanding …

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How to interpret troponins in renal disease?

October 21, 2009
How to interpret troponins in renal disease?

Ivan Saraiva MD

Case: A 68-year-old man, with a history of stable angina and end-stage renal disease treated by hemodialysis for the past three years, presents to the hospital with leg swelling and shortness of breath. He also complains of intermittent chest pain unrelated to exertion. Physical exam reveals bilateral pitting lower extremity edema, pulmonary crackles, and an elevated jugular venous pressure. Initial electrocardiogram is notable for some nonspecific repolarization abnormalities. Troponin I levels drawn at 0, 6, and 12 hours after initial presentation are …

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What is Wellens’ Syndrome?

October 7, 2009
What is Wellens’ Syndrome?

Erin Ducharme MD

Faculty peer reviewed

Wellens’ syndrome refers to a pattern of ECG signs occurring during chest-pain free periods in patients with unstable angina, heralding critical, proximal left anterior descending artery (LAD) stenosis . The eponym honors Dr. Hein J.J. Wellens who first described this ECG phenomenon in 1982. Wellens and colleagues identified a subgroup of patients with unstable angina who demonstrated a pattern of inverted precordial T-waves which strongly correlated with early large anterior myocardial infarction (MI) and a poor prognosis . In …

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Diseases 2.0: Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy (CUA)

August 26, 2009
Diseases 2.0: Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy (CUA)

Rebecca Hall MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Diseases 2.0 – Bringing you the latest updates on disease pathophysiology and treatment

Patient S.J. is a 36 year old female with a 20 year history of lupus and lupus nephritis now with end stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis. She presented with indurated, violaceous skin lesions with ulceration on both thighs. The lesions worsened and became increasingly painful over the last 6 months. Her extensive four month hospital course has been complicated by numerous episodes of superinfection and …

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Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Premature Coronary Artery Disease

June 17, 2009
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Premature Coronary Artery Disease

Ishmeal  Bradley MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Ms. W is a 35 yo woman with a history of systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosed 10 years ago. Her only medications are hydroxychloroquine and prednisone for occasional disease flares. She is otherwise healthy. She has no known personal or family history of cardiac disease or stroke, but does smoke ½ pack of cigarettes per day. Currently, she denies any chest pain, shortness of breath, urinary symptoms, lower extremity edema, or menstrual irregularities, but does report occasional mild joint pain …

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Class Act: Cardiac CT to Assess Coronary Artery Calcium

May 17, 2009
Class Act: Cardiac CT to Assess Coronary Artery Calcium

Matthew Nayor

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The patient: a 55 year old male nonsmoker with an HDL of 46, LDL of 120, triglycerides of 70, BP of 135/80 (on meds) and total cholesterol of 180. (Framingham 10-year risk of MI = 12%)

Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Despite our understanding of how family history, toxic habits, cholesterol, and blood pressure affect the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), there is a clear need to further refine the methods of risk stratification. The …

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What is the Role of Colchicine in Recurrent Pericarditis?

March 14, 2009
What is the Role of Colchicine in Recurrent Pericarditis?

Commentary by Sabina Berezovskaya MD, PGY-3

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Up to 32% of patients with acute pericarditis will have a recurrent episode. Acute attacks are commonly precipitated by infections, malignancy, cardiac trauma, myocardial infection, or autoimmune disease. Recurrent pericarditis usually presents with symptoms akin to the acute attack, including chest pain, fever, pericardial rub, typical electrocardiographic findings (i.e. diffuse ST elevations and PR depressions), pericardial effusion and, infrequently, tamponade. The time to relapse after acute pericarditis usually occurs within 18 to 20 months; however some …

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Mystery Quiz- The Answer

January 16, 2009
Mystery Quiz- The Answer

Posted by Daniel Frenkel MD PGY-3 and Jeffrey Lorin MD, Assistant Professor, NYU Division of Cardiology

Edited by Vivian Hayashi MD and Robert Smith MD, Mystery Quiz Section Editors 

The answer to last week’s mystery quiz is accelerated idioventricular rhythm (AIVR)

AIVR is an ectopic ventricular rhythm with intermediate rates between an escape rhythm (<40 bpm) and ventricular tachycardia (>100-120 bpm). It has the usual features of ventricular arrhythmias including AV dissociation, fusion complexes, and capture complexes. …

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Coronary Artery Disease in South Asians

January 14, 2009
Coronary Artery Disease in South Asians

Commentary by Muhammad Ghumman MD, PGY-3

Faculty Peer Reviewed

South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal) comprises 25% of the global population yet contributes nearly 60% of the global cardiovascular disease burden. There are over 3 million South Asians living in North America (2 million in United States and nearly a quarter million in New York City alone). It is important to recognize that South Asians develop coronary artery disease (CAD) at a younger age, die from CAD at younger ages, and have …

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