ID

Spotlight: Subacute Endocarditis: The Great Masquerader

October 11, 2017
Spotlight: Subacute Endocarditis: The Great Masquerader

By  Helen Ma, MD

Peer Reviewed

Our new Spotlight series uses case vignettes to explore diagnosis, pathophysiology, and management of a wide variety of diseases seen in the outpatient and inpatient settings.  Articles in the Spotlight section contain clinical pearls that will be highlighted in the case discussion.  While the occasional zebra may appear, the goal of the series is to provide clinically relevant information, and each case has been selected specifically for the relevance of its learning points rather than its rarity. 

Learning objectives

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Spotlight: Pneumocystis Pneumonia in a Patient Without AIDS, A Clinical Vignette

September 20, 2017
Spotlight: Pneumocystis Pneumonia in a Patient Without AIDS, A Clinical Vignette

By Martin Fried, MD

Peer reviewed

Learning Objectives

Why does impaired cellular immunity increase the risk for Pneumocystis jiroveci Pneumonia (PJP)?  How do acquired humoral immune deficiencies, such as the use of rituximab, increase the risk for PJP? At what dose of chronic steroids use should patients be given prophylaxis for PJP?

Case Summary

The patient is a 35-year-old man with a history of psoriatic arthritis and complex regional pain syndrome on prednisone, methotrexate and abatacept who presented with two weeks of dyspnea on exertion …

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Sex or Drugs: Why Do We See An Increased Incidence of Oropharyngeal Cancer?

July 13, 2016
Sex or Drugs: Why Do We See An Increased Incidence of Oropharyngeal Cancer?

By Tyler Litton, MD

Peer Reviewed

Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is relatively rare but incidence has increased in the US over the past 40 years. Tonsillar cancer is the most common type of OPSCC followed by base of tongue cancer, which together account for 90% of all OPSCCs. The incidence of both tonsillar and base of tongue cancers individually have also increased in the US. OPSCC is more common in men than women and smoking and alcohol are well known risk factors for …

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The Persistent HIV Crisis: HIV Prevalence Among Black Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM)

February 3, 2016
The Persistent HIV Crisis: HIV Prevalence Among Black Men Who Have Sex With Men (MSM)

By Ofole Mgbako, MD

Peer Reviewed

In July 2010, the much-anticipated “National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the United States” was released to the public. In its introduction, the president declared, “Our Nation is at a crossroads…unless we take bold actions, we face a new era of rising infections, greater challenges in serving people living with HIV, and higher health care costs” . Indeed, the incidence of HIV infection in the U.S. has fallen dramatically over the last few decades, from initially 130,000 new infections annually in …

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Diagnostic Challenges in Latent Tuberculosis Infection: A Brief Review of Available Tests and their Appropriate Use

July 15, 2015
Diagnostic Challenges in Latent Tuberculosis Infection: A Brief Review of Available Tests and their Appropriate Use

By: Miguel A. Saldivar, MD

Peer Reviewed 

“Indeterminate.” Many clinicians have expressed frustration when reading this word on a Quantiferon-TB Gold test result. The obligate follow-up question is: what is the next best step? Repeat the Quantiferon? Ignore it altogether and perform a Tuberculin Skin Test (TST) instead? Even worse, what happens when both tests are performed with discordant results? In order to answer some of these questions, this article begins with a very brief overview of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) infection epidemiology. This is followed …

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Microbiome Blues in E

April 1, 2015
Microbiome Blues in E

By M tanner

Many  bacteria live in and on me—I’ve always known that. But when I learned that bacteria make up 90% of the cells in my body, it made me feel so sucio, so unclean.

I went through my day, realizing for the first time that I am entertaining 100 trillion houseguests who never go home. And who lack all sense of decorum. I know that, technically speaking, bacteria are asexual. But then I read: “one special type of pilus found in ‘male’ strains …

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Ethical Considerations in the Use of Cordons Sanitaires

February 19, 2015
Ethical Considerations in the Use of Cordons Sanitaires

By Rachel Kaplan Hoffmann, M.D., M.S.Ed., and Keith Hoffmann, J.D.

Peer Reviewed

On December 6, 2013, a two-year-old boy living in southeastern Guinea became the first victim of the latest epidemic of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD). Since the death of Patient Zero, EVD has spread throughout West Africa, becoming the largest outbreak of the deadly virus ever . In its most recent report (2/18/15), the World Health Organization (WHO) reported over 20,000 cases of EVD, with over 9,000 reported deaths , but the actual number …

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Are Health Care Providers PrEPared?

September 24, 2014
Are Health Care Providers PrEPared?

By Nathan King

Faculty Reviewed

Doctors are known to be some of the worst patients, and from personal experience I predict that medical students are not too far behind. That’s why when I finally found the time to take a proactive step in maintaining my good health, the last thing I hoped to run into were barriers, but that’s exactly what I hit. To my surprise, it was not at the hands of insurance companies, overbooked doctors, or the general bureaucracy of the medical system; …

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