ID

Quick Thinking Part 4-The Conclusion

April 20, 2007
Quick Thinking Part 4-The Conclusion

Welcome to Quick Thinking. A case is presented in short sections to a faculty expert who will comment on their approach to the patient as the case unfolds. These posts will focus on determining the initial differential diagnoses and diagnostic workups of complicated patient presentations.

Part 1 can be found here.  Part 2 can be found here.  Part 3 can be found here.

Part 3 Case Presentation by Elizabeth Ross, PGY-3:

The patient continued to complain of headache and dizziness and given the patient’s persistent and intermittent fevers…

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Don’t Pass the Olives…

April 18, 2007
Don’t Pass the Olives…

This week, olives from several different companies were found to contain Clostridium Botulinum. No cases of botulism have been reported to date, but this is an opportunity to review the pertinent clinical findings.

Botulism is caused by exposure to the botulinum neurotoxin in clostridium botulinum. There are eight toxin strains identified, 4 are known to cause disease in humans. The toxin is produced only in an anaerobic environment, so bottled or canned food products are a good source of infection. Food may smell…

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Does the Overuse of Macrolides Lead to Antibiotic Resistance?

March 12, 2007
Does the Overuse of Macrolides Lead to Antibiotic Resistance?

Commentary By: Danise Schiliro, PGY-3

Although intuitively we always worry about creating drug resistance when using antibiotics, there is a surprising lack of well done studies that show a clear causal effect of antibiotic use on the development of subsequent drug resistance. A recent study in Lancet may however lead us to re-evaluate our use of macrolides in everyday practice.

Azithromycin and clarithromycin are two of the most commonly used macrolides for treating respiratory infections. Azithromycin has a long half-life, making it convenient for once…

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PB&J Hold the P: Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Peanut Butter

February 15, 2007
PB&J Hold the P: Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Peanut Butter

Commentary By: Cara Litvin PGY-3

 

The CDC has issued a public health advisory regarding a large outbreak of Salmonella infections in 39 states since August. As of Tuesday February 14, 288 cases had been reported to the CDC. Among the 120 patients for whom clinical information is available, 31 patients have been hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported. The most cases have been reported in New York, Pennsylvania,…

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What Is XDR-TB?

February 12, 2007
What Is XDR-TB?

Commentary By: Marshall Fordyce, PGY-3

Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) is as ominous as it sounds. As a second-year resident on the Chest service, you may have treated one or two patients with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), which is resistant to at least INH (Isoniazide) and RIF (Rifampin), the two most powerful first-line agents. However, when TB becomes designated as XDR-TB, it implies resistance to any and all Fluoroquinolones and at least one of the three injectable second-line drugs (Amikacin, Capreomycin, and Kanamycin).…

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Do Statins Get Along With Hepatitis C?

January 4, 2007
Do Statins Get Along With Hepatitis C?

A 53 year old male with chronic hepatitis C and type 2 diabetes is found to have a moderately elevated cholesterol.

1. Is it safe to start a statin?

2. Do statins have any effect on viral replication?

Comentary By Ed Bini, M.D. Associate Professor/Director Gastroenterology and Hepatology Research

The many benefits of statins far outweigh the risks associated with this class of medications. However, statins are known to have the potential to cause hepatotoxicity. The most common form of statin-induced hepatotoxicity is elevations in…

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Does the Existence of Community Acquired MRSA Change Empiric Therapy for Skin and Soft Tissue Infections?

January 3, 2007
Does the Existence of Community Acquired MRSA Change Empiric Therapy for Skin and Soft Tissue Infections?

A 58 year old man with type 2 diabetes and chronic venous insufficiency/recurrent lower extremity cellulitis presents with fever and a left lower extrmity ulcer with purulent drainage. He’s been successfully treated in the past with both Unasyn/Augmentin or Levaquin.  In the face of community acquired methicillin resistant staph aureus (CA-MRSA),  have guidelines for skin and soft tissue infections changed?

Commentary By Howard Leaf, M.D. Assistant Professor, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology

 

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Morning Report-A Frequently Overlooked Diagnosis

December 28, 2006
Morning Report-A Frequently Overlooked Diagnosis

A 57 year old female  with a past medical history of hypertension, obesity, remote intravenous drug use and several years of chronic low back pain, with both intermittent radiation to her lower extremities  and decreased sensation in her lower extremities  presented with an acute worsening of the pain in her lower back.  The patient reported that she was awakened from sleep and "had to crawl to the bathroom," because of the pain.  She was febrile on admission with moderate lower spine tenderness.  She was…

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Does Circumcision Decrease the Transmission of HIV?

December 18, 2006
Does  Circumcision Decrease the Transmission of HIV?

Recently, two large clinical trials in Kenya and Uganda that examined the role of circumcision in men to prevent the spread of HIV were halted on the grounds that not offering circumcision to men taking part in the trial would be unethical.  The trials involved nearly 3,000 heterosexual men in Kenya and nearly 5,000 men in Uganda, none of whom were infected with HIV prior to starting the trial.  In the Kenayn trial, men who were circumcised had a 53% relative risk reduction (2%…

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Outbreak: Toxic Tacos

December 7, 2006
Outbreak: Toxic Tacos

Update 12/12/06  Download new NY DOH Alert

Several Taco Bell restaurants in our area have been shut down recently due to an outbreak of E. Coli O157:H7.  At least 22 people are infected, and most are under age 18.  Interestingly, at least 2 Taco Bell employees have been found to carry the bacteria but are asymptomatic.

The vector is usually undercooked infected meat.  Symptoms usually present within 3-4 days of ingestion. The department of health has issued a warning to physicians to consider this diagnosis if…

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Fast Facts-Rheumatology

November 30, 2006
Fast Facts-Rheumatology

Bellevue Morning Report Teaching Points 11/27

CC: Left knee swelling and pain x 1 week

54 yo male without past medical history in his usual state of health until 5 weeks prior when he had painful ejaculation and intermittent dysuria, denies penile discharge. Treated for a urinary tract infection with unknown antibiotic. 3 weeks later develops recurrent symptoms and again treated with another course of unknown abx by outside physician. However he develops left knee pain and swelling and is unable to…

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Diagnostic Dilemma #2 How Should You Approach a Low Titer +RPR?

November 28, 2006
Diagnostic Dilemma #2 How Should You Approach a Low Titer +RPR?

45 year old male with history of Hep B ( Hep B Surf Ag + but Hep E Ab+ and E Ag – and DNA viral load was not sent) and syphilis treated in the past.  He has RPRs in the past that were 1:1 for years and then negative x 2 a year apart, the last being over two years ago.  He had labs drawn last week and had an RPR of 1:4.  He does report high-risk unsafe sexual activity (with female prostitutes)…

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