Endocrine

Continuous Glucose Monitors

December 2, 2009
Continuous Glucose Monitors

Ilena George

Faculty peer reviewed

Are continuous glucose monitors the answer for better glucose control in diabetes?

A poorly controlled type 2 diabetic who is non-compliant with his at-home glucose monitoring comes to Bellevue’s Adult Primary Care Clinic requesting a prescription for a needle-less glucose monitor…

Self-monitoring of glucose levels is a necessary evil of diabetes treatment. As the prospect of numerous needle-sticks each day in perpetuity is daunting to patients, researchers have been developing non- or minimally-invasive methods to measure blood sugar in hopes …

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What is the Role of Drug Therapy in Treating Obesity?

November 19, 2009
What is the Role of Drug Therapy in Treating Obesity?

Arlene Chung

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Despite the high prevalence of obesity1 and its associated morbidity2 and mortality 3,4, it represents one of the most difficult chronic conditions to treat. Barriers include a metabolically toxic environment, a history of ill-fated weight-loss regimens, and a general view of obesity as primarily a social, not a medical problem. 5 Deep down, the belief that obesity really is the result of gluttony and sloth probably persists. However, as we learn more about the physiology of energy balance, appetite regulation, …

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Breaking News: FDA issues new warning for Exenatide (Byetta®)

November 5, 2009
Breaking News: FDA issues new warning for Exenatide (Byetta®)

Kanika Ballani, Pharm.D.
Diana Hubulasvili, Pharm.D.

 Developed by Amylin Pharmaceuticals, Exenatide (Byetta®) is an incretin mimetic that is used as an adjunctive therapy with metformin, a sulfonylurea or a thiazolidinedione to improve glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients. Mechanistically, Exenatide mimics the actions of endogenous incretin hormone, glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1), causing an increase in insulin secretion which slows gastric emptying and leads to a decrease in food intake. On November 3rd 2009, the FDA issued a safety warning on Exenatide associating it with the …

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The Utility of GlycoMark ™: 1,5 Anhydroglucitol as a Marker for Glycemic Control

September 16, 2009
The Utility of GlycoMark ™: 1,5 Anhydroglucitol as a Marker for Glycemic Control

David R. Friedmann MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Hemoglobin A1 (Hb A1c) is the standard method for monitoring diabetic patients’ long-term glycemic control by indicating average blood glucose levels over a period of two months, or half of the average life span of red blood cells. A new biochemical marker GlycoMarkTM is a test that measures serum levels of 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG), a monosaccharide derived from ingestion of food, slightly different in structure from glucose. The test has been available in Japan since the early 1990s but …

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Grand Rounds: Primary Aldosteronism, Beyond Conn’s Syndrome

June 4, 2009
Grand Rounds: Primary Aldosteronism, Beyond Conn’s Syndrome

Michael Chu MD

Please also see the clinical vignette presented before Grand Rounds on the 21st of May.

The Medical Grand Rounds presentation on May 21, 2009 titled “Primary Aldosteronism, Beyond Conn’s Syndrome” was delivered by Dr. William F. Young M.D., Professor of Medicine at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. Dr. Young’s talk began with the index case of hyperaldosteronism that was described by Dr. Jerome Conn in the 1950’s, through the advances in the diagnosis of hyperaldosteronism, and on to present day treatment …

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Deciphering Fact from Fiction in Hypoglycemia

March 26, 2009
Deciphering Fact from Fiction in Hypoglycemia

Commentary by Melissa Price, MD PGY3

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A 42 year-old male phlebotomist with a history of anxiety presented to the emergency room complaining of four hours of dizziness and diaphoresis. He denied taking any medications. His vitals were stable, his physical exam was significant for a lethargic, diaphoretic young man without focal findings, and his fingerstick value was 43mg/dL. His chest X-ray, EKG, and laboratory results, with the exception of plasma glucose, were within normal limits.

Why is this previously healthy patient suddenly …

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Class Act: AGE-RAGE: What we know about the pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy.

December 26, 2008
Class Act: AGE-RAGE: What we know about the pathophysiology of diabetic neuropathy.

Commentary by Regina Mysliwiec, NYU Medical Student

Faculty Peer Reviewed

G.L. is a 62 year-old African-American male with a six year history of Type 2 Diabetes with variable glucose control and a progressive one year history of burning pain in a unilateral T10 distribution. The pain began at his right abdomen, then spread first to his umbilicus and finally ventrodorsally to his spine. His most recent HgbA1c is 8.0.

One does not have to be a medical student in New York City for very long …

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Class Act: Soy and Breast Cancer – What’s the Connection?

November 26, 2008
Class Act: Soy and Breast Cancer – What’s the Connection?

Commentary by Alexis Melnick, NYU School of Medcine Class of 2009

Faculty peer reviewed

With the increasing popularity of soy foods in the American diet, there has been considerable debate over the link between soy and the risk of cancer, particularly cancer of the breast. The interest in this association stems from soy-containing isoflavones, soybean-derived compounds with chemical structures similar to estrogens that act as weak partial agonists at estrogen receptors. Initial data supported the chemopreventive potential of soy and were based on several findings: …

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