Endocrine

Can you switch a patient from insulin to oral agents?

June 6, 2007
Can you switch a patient from insulin to oral agents?

  A 48 year old male is diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus after presenting to the emergency room with symptoms of hyperglycemia. He was immediately started on insulin and has been very compliant with his regimen. His initial Hemoglobin A1C at the time of diagnosis was 15.  However, over the past few months, due to hypoglycemia, his insulin dosage has been titrated down. He is currently on low doses of NPH and aspart, with an A1C of 6.6. Would it be possible to

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Not So Rosi…

May 24, 2007
Not So Rosi…

Commentary by Seagram Villagomez MD, Chief Resident

Since its approval in 1999, nearly 1 million Americans have used the thiazolidinedione (TZD) rosiglitazone (Avandia – GlaxoSmithKline) for the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes.  However, in a drug class which seems plagued by concerns, the safety profile associated with rosiglitazone has been brought to question. Previously, troglitazone (Rezulin) was pulled off the market secondary to hepatoxicity, while muraglitazar was not approved by the FDA given adverse cardiovascular events during early clinical trials.  In a…

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Statin Pleiotropy: Unique Roles for a Common Medication

April 26, 2007
Statin Pleiotropy: Unique Roles for a Common Medication

By: Melissa Freeman, MD, PGY1

For over a decade now, statins, or 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, have facilitated millions of patients in the management of their atherosclerosis. Statins are known for their ability to reduce hepatic lipoproteins, up-regulate hepatic LDL receptors, and increase apoprotein E- and B-containing lipoproteins. They have become a household name in the genre of lipid-lowering and a touted hero in cardiovascular risk reduction amongst physicians. Excitingly, research has found that statins may be valuable in disease…

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More Breaking News for the Glitazones…

March 15, 2007
More Breaking News for the Glitazones…

Coming right on the heels of the recent warning from the FDA about the risk of fractures and Rosiglitazone, the FDA announced on March 9th that pioglitazone (Actos) has also been linked to an increased occurrence of arm, hand, and foot fractures among women taking the drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes. In an analysis of over 15,000 patients followed for up to 3.5 years, the risk of fracture was 1.9 fractures per 100 patient years in the pioglitazone group, compared to 1.0…

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When Should You Order a Serum Fructosamine Level for a Diabetic Patient?

March 14, 2007
When Should You Order a Serum Fructosamine Level for a Diabetic Patient?

Commentary By: Christopher Johnson, MSIV and Glenn Matfin, MD Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine, Divsion of Endocrinology

When was the last time you had a diabetic patient in clinic whose hemoglobin A1C was elevated, prompting you to modify their diabetic regimen? You may have scheduled a repeat hemoglobin A1C in 3 months, since you know A1C measures glycemic control over a 3 month period. A serum fructosamine may help give you a snapshot of more recent control.

What is fructosamine?
Fructosamine is…

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More Breaking News: Rosiglitazone Linked to Fractures

March 6, 2007
More Breaking News: Rosiglitazone Linked to Fractures

Commentary By: Cara Litvin PGY-3

The FDA recently informed physicians of a report issued by GlaxoSmithKline acknowledging that Avandia (rosiglitazone) has been linked to increased fractures in females (1). The report stems from a review of the safety data from ADOPT (A Diabetes Outcome and Progression Trial) (2), which was a recently published randomized trial of 4,360 patients designed to compare glycemic control with rosiglitazone relative to metformin and glyburide monotherapies. In the published study, there were no unexpected adverse events reported, although…

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A Bad Break for the Purple Pill…

January 8, 2007
A Bad Break for the Purple Pill…

Commentary By Josh Remick, PGY-2

In the December 27th 2006 issue of JAMA, Yang et al. reported the results of a nested case-control study of United Kingdom patients entitled “Long-term Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy and Risk of Hip Fracture.” Using the General Practice Research Database (GPRD), a computerized medical record system used by several of the general medical practices in the UK, new hip fracture cases were found in patients at least 50 years old (n=13,556) and matched them with…

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Do Statins Get Along With Hepatitis C?

January 4, 2007
Do Statins Get Along With Hepatitis C?

A 53 year old male with chronic hepatitis C and type 2 diabetes is found to have a moderately elevated cholesterol.

1. Is it safe to start a statin?

2. Do statins have any effect on viral replication?

Comentary By Ed Bini, M.D. Associate Professor/Director Gastroenterology and Hepatology Research

The many benefits of statins far outweigh the risks associated with this class of medications. However, statins are known to have the potential to cause hepatotoxicity. The most common form of statin-induced hepatotoxicity is elevations in…

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How do you approach a patient with asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism?

December 6, 2006
How do you approach a patient with asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism?

56 year old  Hispanic female with a history of hypertension, type 2 diabetes on oral medications, hyperlipidemia  and normal renal function. Over the past 2 years she has been noted to have mild hypercalcemia (11.0-11.5) on several basic metabolic panels. On her last visit, intact PTH was checked and was elevated at 66 (normal range 7-57). In patients such as this, with apparent asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism, what further diagnostic tests should be done and in whom is surgery indicated?…

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Pfizer Shutting Lights on ILLUMINATE Study

December 4, 2006
Pfizer Shutting Lights on ILLUMINATE Study

Low HDL is a well known independent risk factor for atherosclerotic disease.  As a result, there have been several attempts to develop medications to raise HDL.  Specific targets include the inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein, which plays an essential role in HDL metabolism by facilitating the transfer of cholesterol esters from HDL cholesterol to apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins.

Pfizer created just that drug.  Known as Torcetrapib, it was seen as a promising therapeutic to increase HDL and potentially…

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Listen Now to Thyroid Disorders

October 31, 2006

Check out this example of the Cleveland Clinic podcast from their intensive internal medicine review course. Thyroid Disorders.

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