Endocrine

A Bad Break for the Purple Pill…

January 8, 2007
A Bad Break for the Purple Pill…

Commentary By Josh Remick, PGY-2

In the December 27th 2006 issue of JAMA, Yang et al. reported the results of a nested case-control study of United Kingdom patients entitled “Long-term Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy and Risk of Hip Fracture.” Using the General Practice Research Database (GPRD), a computerized medical record system used by several of the general medical practices in the UK, new hip fracture cases were found in patients at least 50 years old (n=13,556) and matched them with up to 10 age and …

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Do Statins Get Along With Hepatitis C?

January 4, 2007
Do Statins Get Along With Hepatitis C?

A 53 year old male with chronic hepatitis C and type 2 diabetes is found to have a moderately elevated cholesterol.

1. Is it safe to start a statin?

2. Do statins have any effect on viral replication?

Comentary By Ed Bini, M.D. Associate Professor/Director Gastroenterology and Hepatology Research

The many benefits of statins far outweigh the risks associated with this class of medications. However, statins are known to have the potential to cause hepatotoxicity. The most common form of statin-induced hepatotoxicity is elevations in …

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How do you approach a patient with asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism?

December 6, 2006
How do you approach a patient with asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism?

56 year old  Hispanic female with a history of hypertension, type 2 diabetes on oral medications, hyperlipidemia  and normal renal function. Over the past 2 years she has been noted to have mild hypercalcemia (11.0-11.5) on several basic metabolic panels. On her last visit, intact PTH was checked and was elevated at 66 (normal range 7-57). In patients such as this, with apparent asymptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism, what further diagnostic tests should be done and in whom is surgery indicated?

-Danise Schiliro, MD PGY-3

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Pfizer Shutting Lights on ILLUMINATE Study

December 4, 2006
Pfizer Shutting Lights on ILLUMINATE Study

Low HDL is a well known independent risk factor for atherosclerotic disease.  As a result, there have been several attempts to develop medications to raise HDL.  Specific targets include the inhibition of cholesteryl ester transfer protein, which plays an essential role in HDL metabolism by facilitating the transfer of cholesterol esters from HDL cholesterol to apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins.

Pfizer created just that drug.  Known as Torcetrapib, it was seen as a promising therapeutic to increase HDL and potentially use in combination with Lipitor. Drug execs …

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Listen Now to Thyroid Disorders

October 31, 2006

Check out this example of the Cleveland Clinic podcast from their intensive internal medicine review course. Thyroid Disorders.…

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