GI

Hepatocellular Carcinoma Screening Guidelines and Bellevue’s High-Risk Population

June 22, 2011
Hepatocellular Carcinoma Screening Guidelines and Bellevue’s High-Risk Population

By Ramoncito David

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the world.  The prevalence of this fatal disease greatly varies among different nations, due to the fact that almost 80% of cases are secondary to hepatitis B or C.

The implementation of an effective vaccine against the hepatitis B virus (HBV) has reduced the prevalence of HBV carriers in North America to 0.1-2%; however, hepatitis B remains a global public health problem due its high prevalence in …

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The Myth of the Helminth: Can Worms be the Next Therapeutic Breakthrough for IBD Patients?

March 16, 2011
The Myth of the Helminth: Can Worms be the Next Therapeutic Breakthrough for IBD Patients?

By Michael Guss, Class of  2012

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Helminths–parasitic worms that have co-evolved with humans and colonized our gastrointestinal (GI) tract for millennia–have developed the ability to modulate our inflammatory responses and evade our immune systems to survive . Until the 1930s, the helminth colonization of humans was almost universal, owing to poor sanitation conditions and an impure food supply . This changed as the economic development of the last century created improved sanitary conditions: clean running water, hygienic farming practices, and better medical …

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Should You Eradicate Helicobacter Pylori Prior to Chronic NSAID Treatment?

January 19, 2011
Should You Eradicate Helicobacter Pylori Prior to Chronic NSAID Treatment?

By Joshua Smith, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

CASE:  A 54-year-old Asian female with no significant past medical history presents to her primary care physician with the complaint of several weeks of pain in her fingers bilaterally along with pronounced, worsening morning stiffness.  She is subsequently diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and the decision is made to start her on long-term, high-dose non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).  Given the link between NSAIDs and peptic ulcer disease (PUD), should this patient first be tested, and if positive, treated …

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Is a Low Vitamin D Level a Risk Factor for Colon Cancer?

December 16, 2010
Is a Low Vitamin D Level a Risk Factor for Colon Cancer?

By Nelson Sanchez, MD and Fritz Francois, MD, MS

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Case: A 45-year-old woman presents to your office for an annual check-up.  She states that her grandmother was recently diagnosed with colon cancer at the age of 90, and she wants to know what she can do to reduce her own risk for the disease.  She recently read an article about the benefits of vitamin D and wants to know if they extend to protecting against colon cancer. In particular, she is concerned

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Branched Chain Amino Acid Supplementation for Patients with Cirrhosis

December 3, 2010
Branched Chain Amino Acid Supplementation for Patients with Cirrhosis

By Nicole Leigh Aaronson,MD,  Loren Wissner Greene, MD, and  Denise Pate, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Introduction:

Whereas there are specially designed diets for patients with hypertension, diabetes, and renal failure, NYU Medical Center, like most medical centers, does not have a specific diet for patients with cirrhosis. In considering what dietary modifications might benefit these patients, it is useful to first examine the nutritional status of the cirrhotic patient. Cirrhosis is a disease characterized by progressive liver injury and hepatocyte death, which eventually produces fibrosis …

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Proton Pump Inhibitors 2.0

November 26, 2010
Proton Pump Inhibitors 2.0

By Mary C. Whitman, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are generally considered “safe” medications and are prescribed to over 100 million patients per year for a variety of indications, often for long durations. Recently, new data has emerged that suggests that we should be more judicious in prescribing PPIs.

In a recent development, the FDA announced that it will require new labeling of PPIs indicating that their use at high dosage and for prolonged durations is associated with an increased risk of …

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How do you Manage the Adult with Perinatally Acquired Hepatitis B?

October 22, 2010
How do you Manage the Adult with Perinatally Acquired Hepatitis B?

Nathaniel Rosso Smilowitz, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Hepatitis B virus is a DNA hepadnavirus affecting 1.25 million people in the United States and nearly 400 million worldwide.  The virus is transmitted perinatally, sexually, and percutaneously, and is endemic in many countries in South East Asia, Central Asia, and Africa.  When exposure occurs early in life, the likelihood of chronic infection is high; up to 90% of cases of vertical transmission result in the persistence of the viral envelope protein, the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), …

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Does Heyde Syndrome (The Association Between Aortic Stenosis And Intestinal Angiodysplasia) Exist?

September 29, 2010
Does Heyde Syndrome (The Association Between Aortic Stenosis And Intestinal Angiodysplasia) Exist?

By Lara Dunn, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

In 1958, EC Heyde published 10 cases of aortic stenosis (AS) and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the gastrointestinal tract in the New England Journal of Medicine .  Thus, the association between aortic stenosis and intestinal angiodysplasia became known as Heyde Syndrome.  Yet the existence of this syndrome has been controversial.

Contrasting conclusions have been obtained by studies conducted to evaluate this association.  In a prospective study, Bhutani and colleagues did not find an increased prevalence of AS in …

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