Primecuts – This Week in the Journals

October 2, 2017
Primecuts – This Week in the Journals

By Kumar Vasudevan, MD

Peer Reviewed

With October beginning and the weather starting to change, the season for apple picking, Pumpkin Spice Lattes, and football also commences. However, with all the joys of fall, we also begin flu season and prepare for all the complications that it brings.  With this in mind, we turn to the medical literature which searches for novel treatments for this deadly illness.

Oseltamivir, Amantadine and Ribavirin Combination Antiviral Therapy versus Oseltamivir Monotherapy for the Treatment of Influenza

The flu is …

Read more »

Life and Limb: Battlefield Medicine from WWII to Today

September 29, 2017
Life and Limb:  Battlefield Medicine from WWII to Today

By Eric Jeffrey Nisenbaum, MD

Peer Reviewed

Mr. O is a 93-year-old man with a past medical history notable for severe Alzheimer’s dementia and amputation of the left upper extremity secondary to wounds received in WWII who was brought in from his nursing home with fever and dyspnea for two days.  His physical exam was notable for inspiratory crackles at the right lung base.  His CBC was notable for an elevated WBC with left-shift and a chest x-ray revealing a right lower lobe infiltrate. He …

Read more »

Stem cells for heart failure: What is the evidence?

September 27, 2017
Stem cells for heart failure: What is the evidence?

By Maxine Wallis Stachel, MD

Peer Reviewed

The Scale of the Problem

Despite decades of rigorous data collection, drug research, patient education and evidence-based practice, ischemic heart disease (IHD) and congestive heart failure (CHF) remain among the most deadly diagnoses in America. The standardization of medical therapy and surgical revascularization have reduced morbidity and mortality, but these measures have not kept pace with the burden and cost of disease, which continue to expand as the population ages and more patients survive acute myocardial infarction. IHD …

Read more »

Spotlight: Pneumocystis Pneumonia in a Patient Without AIDS, A Clinical Vignette

September 20, 2017
Spotlight: Pneumocystis Pneumonia in a Patient Without AIDS, A Clinical Vignette

By Martin Fried, MD

Peer reviewed

Learning Objectives

Why does impaired cellular immunity increase the risk for Pneumocystis jiroveci Pneumonia (PJP)?  How do acquired humoral immune deficiencies, such as the use of rituximab, increase the risk for PJP? At what dose of chronic steroids use should patients be given prophylaxis for PJP?

Case Summary

The patient is a 35-year-old man with a history of psoriatic arthritis and complex regional pain syndrome on prednisone, methotrexate and abatacept who presented with two weeks of dyspnea on exertion …

Read more »

Primecuts – This Week in the Journals

September 18, 2017
Primecuts – This Week in the Journals

By Alvaro F. Vargas P. M.D

Peer Reviewed

As the world and the United States recover from disasters such as storms the size of a country , record-breaking earthquakes , and hundreds of millions of data breaches , let us force ourselves to turn our attention to the comforts of data with this week’s Primecuts.

SPRINT re-revisited: intensive BP control increases CKD events but still saves lives

The well-referenced SPRINT trial (5), continues to be prominently featured in the literature. Three weeks ago a NEJM …

Read more »

From the Archives: Does Running Cause Knee Osteoarthritis?

September 15, 2017
From the Archives: Does Running Cause Knee Osteoarthritis?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated September 14, 2013

By Karin Katz, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Post-summer is here. Despite the heat and what feels like 100% humidity, the East River Path is packed with runners. No amount of car fumes pouring onto the path could stop those in training. Others are circling the 6-mile-loop around Central Park. Or, if you are bored of running the typical routes, for a few Saturdays, Park Avenue will be shut down for automobile traffic. New Yorkers …

Read more »

50% of the Daily Salt Intake Recommended by the JNC-8 Is Consumed in a New York Minute

September 13, 2017
50% of the Daily Salt Intake Recommended by the JNC-8 Is Consumed in a New York Minute

By Andrew Sideris

Peer Reviewed

Reduction of dietary sodium is a well-known nonpharmacologic therapy to reduce blood pressure. The 8th Joint National Commission (JNC-8) recommends that the general population limit daily intake of sodium to less than 2.4 grams. On average, a mean reduction in systolic blood pressure of 2-8 mmHg is expected if dietary sodium intake is limited to no more than 2.4 grams per day.1 Further reduction of sodium to 1.5 grams is desirable for people with hypertension because it is associated with …

Read more »

Slow Respiration to Lower Blood Pressure

September 7, 2017
Slow Respiration to Lower Blood Pressure

By Omotayo Arowojolu

Peer Reviewed

Approximately 32% of American adults have high blood pressure (>140/90 mmHg),1 or hypertension, and only 54% of these individuals have well-controlled hypertension.2,3 Hypertension costs $48.6 billion each year in healthcare services, medications, and missed days of work. Additionally, one in three Americans have pre-hypertension (120-139/80-89 mmHg) and are considered at risk for developing hypertension.1 These individuals benefit from management of risk factors with changes in diet (reduced sodium), weight loss, increased physical activity, and smoking or alcohol cessation. On the …

Read more »