ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

June 23, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Michael Poles MD, Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations 

Hey Blogophiles,

In case you were blogopenic, awaiting the latest installment of shortcuts, here we go.

It is still early morning as I write this. Many folk the world over are sitting down to their 1st or 2nd or perhaps 3rd cup of coffee. Caffeiniacs rejoice because an article in the latest issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine suggests that you may be headed for a longer life. The authors sought to…

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Mystery Quiz

June 19, 2008
Mystery Quiz

Posted by Athena Kritharis MS-3, Vivian Hayashi MD, Instructor of Clinical Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Robert Smith MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

The patient is a 42 year old Caucasian woman with no significant past medical history who presents with diffuse abdominal pain for two months that progressed to acute epigastric pain followed by nausea and vomiting. The vomitus was “milky” and contained only food particles. Symptoms were not relieved with over-the-counter antacids. The patient recalls eating scallops…

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Meeting Perspectives: 2008 American Thoracic Society Meeting

June 18, 2008
Meeting Perspectives: 2008 American Thoracic Society Meeting

Commentary by Laura Evans MD, NYU Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 

The 2008 American Thoracic Society (ATS) meeting took place from May 16-21 in Toronto, Ontario.  Over 16,000 physicians, nurses and respiratory therapists attended the meeting.  There were more than 400 sessions, 800 speakers and 5,500 original research abstracts focusing on pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine. 

The NYU Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care medicine was well represented.  The division presented more than 20 original research abstracts and…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

June 16, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Joshua Remick MD, NYU Senior Chief Resident

We’ll start this week off with some good news—we’re living longer and dying less! At least we were back in 2006. You remember 2006 don’t you? That was the year that Dick Cheney shot his buddy, Pluto was demoted, Brokeback Mountain created the stir but Crash won the Oscar, Roger Clemens unretired for the 3rd time (more on this in a bit) and Taylor Hicks was your American Idol. This week the CDC released…

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Neutropenic Precautions Demystified

June 13, 2008
Neutropenic Precautions Demystified

Commentary by Rachana Jani MD, PGY-1 and Neal Steigbigel MD, Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases/Immunology)

Rachana Jani MD:  Walking onto an oncology floor, one cannot help but notice the precautionary signs that segregate these patients from the rest of the hospital. “No fresh fruits or flowers.” “Neutropenic isolation, please see nurse before entering.” The idea of neutropenic precautions first emerged in the 1960s when myelosuppressive therapy came to the forefront of cancer treatment. It only made sense that patients with an impaired immune…

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Should H. pylori Eradication Be Confirmed?

June 12, 2008
Should H. pylori Eradication Be Confirmed?

Commentary by Fritz Francois, MD, MS, NYU Division of Gastroenterology

Humans are essentially the only reservoir for Helicobacter pylori, which is estimated to colonize the stomach of about half the world’s population (1). Although the bacteria generally do not invade the mucosa, attachment to the epithelium leads to an inflammatory reaction with neutrophils, lymphocytes, plasma cells, and macrophages. Over time, the persistent inflammation leads to changes in the gastric mucosa that may predispose to the development of dysplasia(2).

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Some say tomato, some say nationwide outbreak of Samonellosis

June 10, 2008
Some say tomato, some say nationwide outbreak of Samonellosis

Commentary by Chirayu Gor, MD

The CDC has issued an alert regarding the outbreak of a rare type of Salmonella, termed Salmonella Saintpaul. Since mid-April, over 140 persons have been identified in 16 states with this uncommon serotype of Salmonella. Preliminary investigation has implicated tomatoes.

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

June 9, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Neil Shapiro MD, Editor-in-Chief, Clinical Correlations

Spiking oil prices, unemployment at 5.5%, Israel considering bombing Iran, 95 degree heat in early June, the White House exaggerating the case to go to war…the news was just tremendously uplifting this week. At least the democrats seem to be getting their act together. Sorry to start ShortCuts on a downer, but I thought maybe what follows could be seen as a reprieve from the news, where you can spend a moment not cursing the…

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