Noninvasive Cardiac Imaging: Coronary CT Angiography

March 26, 2008
Noninvasive Cardiac Imaging: Coronary CT Angiography

Commentary by Matt LaBarbera MD, PGY-3 and Rob Donnino, MD Instructor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology

Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is a noninvasive imaging modality which can be used to evaluate the anatomy of the coronary arteries. Unlike coronary artery calcium scoring, which utilizes noncontrast CT to assess atherosclerotic disease burden, CCTA allows direct visualization of the coronary artery wall and lumen with the administration of intravenous contrast. The degree of coronary luminal stenosis can be reliably estimated, as can the presence or absence…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

March 25, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Henry Tran MD

The seasons of the year, like governors of New York, change quickly. And with that, we welcome the new spring, a time of rebirth and renewal!

Well sticking with the spring theme, it seems “newer blood” might be safer than “older blood.” There has been evidence to suggest that during storage, red blood cells undergo functional and structural changes which impair RBC function (termed “storage lesion”). A retrospective study from Cleveland Clinic published in the NEJM examined…

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Class Act: Are beta-blockers really contraindicated for patients with a diagnosis of reactive airway disease?

March 21, 2008
Class Act: Are beta-blockers really contraindicated for patients with a diagnosis of reactive airway disease?

Commentary by Katherine Khvilivitzky, NYU Medical Student

Class act is a feature of Clinical Correlations written by NYU 3rd and 4th year medical students. These posts focus on evidenced based answers to clinical questions related to patients seen by our students in the clinics or on the wards. Prior to publication, each commentary is thoroughly reviewed for content by a faculty member.

In the past, reactive airway disease was considered to be a contraindication to administration of all beta-blockers including ophthalmic preparations.…

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A Brief Glance at the Relationship between Varicocele and Infertility

March 19, 2008
A Brief Glance at the Relationship between Varicocele and Infertility

Commentary by Melissa Freeman MD, PGY-2

A 30 year-old male resident presents to his primary care physician for a routine physical examination. A small, nontender left-sided scrotal mass is felt. The patient states that this asymptomatic mass has been present for one year and was evaluated by a prior physician who felt that further work-up was unnecessary. He is sent for a testicular ultrasound which reveals a grade II varicocele. His testosterone level was low and he later had a semen analysis which was abnormal.…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

March 17, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Josh Olstein MD, Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations

Let’s begin this St. Patrick’s Day edition of ShortCuts with a look across the pond. An article published in this week’s edition of The Lancet that studied the use of antibiotics for adults with acute rhinosinusitis. Anyone who’s been to clinic this winter knows that rarely a session goes by without at least one patient requesting antibiotics for this more-than-questionable indication. By performing a meta-analysis using individual patient data from nine placebo-controlled trials of…

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Breaking Bad News to Patients- A Challenge for Residents

March 13, 2008
Breaking Bad News to Patients- A Challenge for Residents

Commentary by Parul Gandhi MD, PGY-2

Bad news can be defined as “Situations where there is either a feeling of no hope, a threat to a person’s mental or physical well-being, a risk of upsetting an established lifestyle, or where a message is given which conveys to an individual fewer choices in his or her life.”(1)

As residents, we spend our time caring for patients and their families. Despite all of our valiant efforts, though, there are times when we must deliver…

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Class Act: Is there clinical evidence for use of probiotics in the treatment of IBS?

March 12, 2008
Class Act: Is there clinical evidence for use of probiotics in the treatment of IBS?

Class act is a feature of Clinical Correlations written by NYU 3rd and 4th year medical students. These posts focus on evidenced based answers to clinical questions related to patients seen by our students in the clinics or on the wards. Prior to publication, each commentary is thoroughly reviewed for content by a faculty member.

Commentary by Alexander Jow, MSIII

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood disorder, commonly encountered in clinical practice; IBS accounts for more than one-third of…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

March 10, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Cara Litvin MD, Executive Editor, Clinical Correlations 

Vaccines were the buzz this week after it was made public that a federal government program designed to compensate people after vaccine injuries agreed to compensate the family of an autistic child, concluding that the vaccines may have “aggravated” an underlying mitochondrial disorder, leading to autism-like symptoms. The case drew new attention to a long standing controversy centering on the possible link between thimersol, a preservative previously used in childhood vaccines, and autism. However, many major studies…

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