Appropriateness for Revascularization in Stable Angina

July 1, 2010
Appropriateness for Revascularization in Stable Angina

Introduction to Cases:

During the upcoming weeks, we will post a series of cases addressing the appropriate treatment for patients with stable coronary artery disease. We will be focus on indications for revascularization in stable angina. In all of the cases, the patients will be at high enough risk that stress tests and coronary angiography will be performed.

There has been recent data and recommendations on the appropriate indications for revascularization in stable angina. These recommendations are based on clinical symptoms, non-invasive imaging, and catheterization …

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Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

June 28, 2010
Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

Michael Fingerhood, MD, MPH

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Ah, the long balmy days of summer in New York, replete with dining al fresco, Shakespeare in The Park, bumper-to-bumper traffic to our pristine (for now, at least) local beaches, and of course the armies of fresh-faced, eager young Housestaff  proudly marching through the wards in their new long white coats. July 1st quickly approaches, and with it NYU’s new interns (myself included) excitedly begin their vital role within the nation’s healthcare system. Yet behind this excitement lies …

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Myths & Realities: Is Shiftwork Tumorgenic?

June 23, 2010
Myths & Realities: Is Shiftwork Tumorgenic?

By David Ecker, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Over the last several decades, Westernized countries have become 24-hour societies.  Approximately 21 million workers in the US are on non-standard work shifts, including almost 4 million on regular overnight shifts. In 1972, Taylor and Pocock published a mortality study, in which they reported a significantly increased incidence of neoplasms in shift workers compared to the general population. After several published cancer incidence studies, Kerenyi explicitly proposed that changes in light exposure could be an important etiologic factor …

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Primecuts: This Week In The Journals

June 21, 2010
Primecuts: This Week In The Journals

By Jeffrey Mayne, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

PRIMECUTS!  PRIMECUTS!  As the excitement of the World Cup rolls on and the din of those vuvuzela horns continues to ring heavy in your ears, the Wall Street Journal reports the horns once used to rally people in remote places, now used to champion athletes, may have lasting effects .  The vuvuzela is traditionally made from the horn of a kudu, a species of antelope found in Africa and was first used to communicate over long distances.  Today …

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Does Dietary Modification Help GERD?

June 18, 2010
Does Dietary Modification Help GERD?

By Ramya Srinivasan, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The patient is a 29 year old overweight male presenting to clinic with complaints of reflux symptoms. He says that spicy foods aggravate these symptoms. In addition to weight loss counseling, he is given a prescription for esomeprazole along with a patient handout containing recommendations on foods to avoid and other behavior modifications that may ameliorate his symptoms.

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is defined as the abnormal reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus at least once a …

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A Tale of Olympic Survival

June 17, 2010
A Tale of Olympic Survival

By David Chong, MD

 As the world watched the greatest athletes gather to compete in Vancouver, I was on a plane to Haiti.  Just getting on the plane was quite a feat.  After I received an urgent e-mail for volunteer doctors from the University of Miami’s Project Medishare field hospital in Port-au-Prince, Haiti late on a Friday night during an overnight shift at NY Presbyterian hospital, I began to send frantic requests for coverage for the week.  Slowly, I began to receive supportive responses but …

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Primecuts: This Week In The Journals

June 14, 2010
Primecuts: This Week In The Journals

By Maryann Kwa, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

This week, ecstatic soccer fans around the world are gathering to watch the excitement and celebrate the camaraderie that is the World Cup.  As the enthusiasm reaches a fever pitch in South Africa–the first country on the continent to host the games–the competitive spirit amongst players and fans is surely running high.  Speaking of competition, we start this edition of Primecuts with a very interesting piece in The New York Times about testosterone and trust .  Trust plays …

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Appropriateness for Revascularization in Stable Angina

June 9, 2010
Appropriateness for Revascularization in Stable Angina

Introduction to Cases:

During the upcoming weeks, we will post a series of cases addressing the appropriate treatment for patients with stable coronary artery disease. We will be focus on indications for revascularization in stable angina. In all of the cases, the patients will be at high enough risk that stress tests and coronary angiography will be performed.

There has been recent data and recommendations on the appropriate indications for revascularization in stable angina. These recommendations are based on clinical symptoms, non-invasive imaging, and catheterization …

Read more »