Breaking Bad News to Patients- A Challenge for Residents

March 13, 2008
Breaking Bad News to Patients- A Challenge for Residents

Commentary by Parul Gandhi MD, PGY-2

Bad news can be defined as “Situations where there is either a feeling of no hope, a threat to a person’s mental or physical well-being, a risk of upsetting an established lifestyle, or where a message is given which conveys to an individual fewer choices in his or her life.”(1)

As residents, we spend our time caring for patients and their families. Despite all of our valiant efforts, though, there are times when we must deliver…

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Class Act: Is there clinical evidence for use of probiotics in the treatment of IBS?

March 12, 2008
Class Act: Is there clinical evidence for use of probiotics in the treatment of IBS?

Class act is a feature of Clinical Correlations written by NYU 3rd and 4th year medical students. These posts focus on evidenced based answers to clinical questions related to patients seen by our students in the clinics or on the wards. Prior to publication, each commentary is thoroughly reviewed for content by a faculty member.

Commentary by Alexander Jow, MSIII

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood disorder, commonly encountered in clinical practice; IBS accounts for more than one-third of…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

March 10, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Cara Litvin MD, Executive Editor, Clinical Correlations 

Vaccines were the buzz this week after it was made public that a federal government program designed to compensate people after vaccine injuries agreed to compensate the family of an autistic child, concluding that the vaccines may have “aggravated” an underlying mitochondrial disorder, leading to autism-like symptoms. The case drew new attention to a long standing controversy centering on the possible link between thimersol, a preservative previously used in childhood vaccines, and autism. However, many major studies…

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HotSpots: Promed

March 7, 2008
HotSpots: Promed

Welcome to HotSpots, a new feature of Clinical Correlations. In this series, we intend to highlight unique websites of interest to the medical profession. Feel free to make suggestions for sites that should be featured in this series by clicking the comment field or sending us an email.

Commentary by Shrujal Baxi MD, NYU Chief Resident

http://www.healthmap.org/promed 

If you don’t know what the Chikungunya virus is or you want to know where the Plague is killing people in the world today, then this…

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Ethical Dilemmas: Medical Futility-The Texas Approach

March 6, 2008
Ethical Dilemmas: Medical Futility-The Texas Approach

Commentary by Vlad Fridman MD, PGY-3

Futility is a topic which has been debated since the beginning of modern medicine. In Hippocratic times, medical practitioners were called upon to serve three purposes: cure, comfort, and refuse to treat those who were overmastered by illness. (1) The distinction was much clearer when things like CPR, ventilators, and dialysis machines were not yet available. These and other life-sustaining/saving medical techniques have blurred the line of when a person is “overmastered by illness” making it…

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Bell’s Palsy 2.0—Crocodile Dundee Tears

March 5, 2008
Bell’s Palsy 2.0—Crocodile Dundee Tears

Diseases 2.0 – Bringing you the latest updates on disease pathophysiology and treatment

Commentary by Aaron Lord MD, PGY-1

A 39 year-old woman awakes one morning and notices that the left side of her face is droopy. While at work, she has trouble controlling her saliva and it dribbles down the left side of her chin. At dinner, she has trouble eating and notices food stuck between her lips and teeth on the left side. The next morning she sees her primary…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

March 4, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

There were many medical stories in the news last week that seemed relevant and worthy of a spot in this week’s ShortCuts. First, the CDC released a statement regarding the flu in its February 9th issue of MMWR. The CDC conducts surveillance in several ways and this year appears to have more states reporting flu activity and more specimens positive for influenza than in the last 3 years. The question has arisen…

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How do you approach male patients with osteoporosis?

February 28, 2008
How do you approach male patients with osteoporosis?

Commentary by Carrie Mahowald MD

Case: GS, a 65 year old man with only a history of severe OA, is seen in pre-op clinic for medical clearance before his hip replacement. On his pre-op x-ray, an incidental finding of a lumbar vertebral compression fracture is noted. After his hip replacement, how would you work him up for osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis, defined as low bone mass and the deterioration of bone micro-architecture which leads to the compromise of bone strength and the increased risk of fracture,…

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