Corticosteroids in Sepsis Now Less Stimulating

April 30, 2008
Corticosteroids in Sepsis Now Less Stimulating

Commentary by Joe Philip MD, PGY-2

CORTICUS was the long-awaited trial addressing the use of corticosteroids in sepsis that was published in the NEJM this past January. Months prior to the leading auther Charles Sprung publishing it, the Tisch and Bellevue intensive care units halted corticotropin stimulation testing. Corticosteroids have warranted much publicity since CORTICUS came out—and rightly so as practice across the country has changed because of it. The Survinig Sepsis Campaign has now downgraded the recommendation on the use of…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

April 28, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

This week’s ShortCuts begins with a follow up of a story first presented in March, 2008, when the recall of potentially contaminated heparin was reported.

Typical case: 73 year old woman with a complex medical history including end-stage renal disease treated with the use of hemodialysis for 7 years routinely receives heparin intravenously during hemodialysis. In January 2008, during a dialysis session, she develops hypotension with associated nausea and…

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Clinical Pathology Conference 4/08 – The Answer

April 24, 2008

Case Presentation by Alana Choy-Shan MD, Chief Resident

Please review the posting of our prior CPC here.

When you’re ready you can download the CPC Answer.

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The ABCDs of Medicare

April 23, 2008
The ABCDs of Medicare

Commentary by Vlad Fridman MD, PGY-3

On July 30, 1965, then president Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law an amendment to the Social Security legislation establishing a national health care program for the elderly called Medicare. In fact, at the signing, former president Harry S. Truman was enrolled as the first Medicare beneficiary and received the first Medicare card. Then it was simple. Currently, Medicare is a complicated health insurance program that is comprised of multiple parts, various co-payment and deductible schedules, and…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

April 21, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Danise Schiliro-Chuang, NYU Chief Resident

Welcome to this week’s edition of ShortCuts. Hope that everyone has enjoyed the nice spring weekend weather.

Let’s begin with some news in the world of medical informatics. In an article published in the April 17 edition of NEJM and that grabbed the attention of the New York Times, authors Mandl and Kohane discuss the pros and cons of personally controlled health records (PCHRs). Two large corporations, Microsoft and Google, have begun to offer patients…

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Clinical Correlations Ranked in Top 100 Academic Medical Blogs!!

April 18, 2008

Clinical Correlations is listed as #9 in a recent listing of the top 100 academic medical blogs. We’re proud of this recognition and wanted to share it with all of our readers.  Thanks for your support, and we look forward to continuing to work to make Clinical Correlations even better.

-the Editors

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HotSpots: The NAME

April 17, 2008
HotSpots: The NAME

Welcome to HotSpots. In this series, we intend to highlight unique websites of interest to the medical profession. Feel free to make suggestions for sites that should be featured in this series by clicking the comment field or sending us an email.

Commentary by Shrujal Baxi MD, NYU Chief Resident

www.thename.org 

Completing death certificates sounds like an easy task, but anyone who has been hounded by the medical records partment knows just how hard it can be. After you fill in all the…

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Future Medicine: The Search for a New Anticoagulant

April 16, 2008
Future Medicine: The Search for a New Anticoagulant

Future Medicine is a new section of Clinical Correlations devoted to hot areas of research and development in various fields of medicine. In tihis series, we will highlight treatments in their infancy, from basic research opening up new targets for treatment, to following small molecules throughout their clinical investigation. We will also bring you the latest on technology and devices, as well as perspectives on drug discovery from a business point of view. Watch out – the future is just around the corner!

Commentary by Aaron Lord

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