Grand Rounds: “Hyponatremia: Something Old, Something New”

January 30, 2008
Grand Rounds: “Hyponatremia: Something Old, Something New”

Commentary by Elizabeth Haskins MD, PGY-3

This week’s Grand Rounds was delivered by Dr. Tomas Berl, Chief of the Nephrology Division at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver. Dr. Berl’s current research focuses on osmoregulated proteins of the inner medulla.

Hyponatremia, defined as a serum sodium concentration less than 136 mEq/L, is one of the most common electrolyte abnormalities in the hospitalized patient. In one Colorado hospital, the daily incidence of hyponatremia was 1% and the prevalence was 2.5%. The rate…

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Mystery Quiz

January 29, 2008
Mystery Quiz

Posted By: Vivian Hayashi, MD, Instructor of Clinical Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Robert Smith, MD Associate Professor of Medicine, Division Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

A 78 year old man with a history of ankylosing spondylitis and known cardiac disease associated with congestive heart failure, presented with breathlessness one year prior to admission.  Over the most recent months, the patient complained of cough productive of voluminous frothy, watery sputum.  Medications included digoxin, furosemide, irbesartan, isosorbide, metoprolol, spirinolactone, simvastatin, and warfarin.  The patient had worked…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

January 28, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Henry Tran, MD

Old adage: just because it’s new doesn’t necessarily mean it’s better. The FDA approved the usage of drug-eluting stents (DES) in 2003 and these stents were quickly embraced by the cardiology community as a technological breakthrough in the treatment of coronary artery disease. It’s estimated that more than six million people worldwide have been implanted with a DES. In 2006, two studies created a lot of discussion by reporting an increased incidence of late stent thrombosis with DES…

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SSRIs: Do They Increase Rates of Suicide?

January 25, 2008
SSRIs: Do They Increase Rates of Suicide?

Commentary by Arthur Sinkman MD, NYU Department of Psychiatry

Three years ago the FDA began requiring that all selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) carry a black-box warning stating that their use in children and adolescents is associated with an increase in risk for suicidal thinking, feelings and behavior. Recently the FDA ordered that this warning be extended to include treatment for young adults aged 18 to 24.

The 2004 order had a dramatic impact on the treatment of depression in children. The use of SSRIs dropped…

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Clinical Pathology Conference 1/08

January 24, 2008
Clinical Pathology Conference 1/08

Case presentation by Minisha Sood MD, Chief Resident

Welcome to the monthly posting of our NYU Department of Medicine’s Clinical Pathology Conference. Use the link below to review the case, followed by a slide presentation of the radiological findings. Feel free to make your diagnosis by clicking the comment field. We will reveal the answer next week.

Clinical Pathology Conference Case Presentation 1/08

 

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Shortcuts-This Week in the Journals

January 22, 2008
Shortcuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Sean Cavanaugh MD, Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations

If you think the modern scientific literature is reading more and more like science fiction each day, get a load of this: apparently they are growing hearts in Minneapolis. More than an interestingly macabre headline, this represents a significant advancement toward a dream long held by transplant physicians, and allows for a more vivid imagining of the day when we have the technology to grow organs from an individual’s own stem cells. The accomplishment,…

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Health Care 2008: Where the Candidates Stand- Part 3 Edwards, McCain and Romney

January 18, 2008
Health Care 2008: Where the Candidates Stand- Part 3 Edwards, McCain and Romney

In this series, we are trying to cut through some of the media hype in order to summarize the health care proposals put forward by the leading candidates for President.

Commentary by Aaron Lord MD, PGY-1

Our third post presents the plans of one Democrat and two Republicans.

John Edwards (D)

The “Edwards Plan for Universal Health Care” would create a system of regional, non-profit “Health Care Markets” — collectives of discount insurance plans. Individuals could choose from any one…

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Grand Rounds: “Two patients with splenomegaly: what is the diagnosis?”

January 17, 2008
Grand Rounds: “Two patients with splenomegaly: what is the diagnosis?”

Commentary by Noga Chlamtac MD, PGY 3

This weeks grand rounds was delivered by Dr. Pramod Mistry, Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine, and Chief of the Section of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Mistry received his Ph.D degree from the St. Thomas Hospital Medical School at the University of London in 1979 and his clinical training at the Royal Free Hospital and the Royal College of Physicians. Starting in 1998, he served as the Director of the Comprehensive…

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