Evolution and Medicine: Practicing medicine with only half of biology?

August 5, 2009
Evolution and Medicine: Practicing medicine with only half of biology?

Mark Schwartz MD

Why do we age? Why is congestive heart failure so common? Why do so many of us wear glasses? Why is there a menopause? Why must we sleep? Why do we get febrile when infected?

Medical students, trainees, and physicians are drawn to questions of how the body works, so your likely first response to these intriguing questions is to think about pathophysiologic answers. These proximal, mechanistic explanations form the conceptual and cognitive framework for our learning, practice, and research in medicine.…

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PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

August 3, 2009
PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

Michael Chu MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

With summer well underway and a new class of interns having gotten their feet wet by now (perhaps it might feel more like drowning for a few), we have a few interesting articles in the news this past week, ranging from black-market organ sales in the US to immunodeficiency viruses in chimpanzees.

This past week the press reported on an FBI probe into corruption charges in New Jersey involving mayors and several rabbis. What stood out amid the allegations …

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Tales of Survival: Wife Knows Best

August 1, 2009
Tales of Survival: Wife Knows Best

Bellevue Hospital, the nation’s oldest public hospital and the heart of our residency program, provides unique and unforgettable training for new physicians.  It is probably safe to say that every resident who trains at Bellevue graduates with a lifetime of stories about the experience. “Tales of Survival” was created to convey some of those stories.

Melissa Price MD

As a second year medicine resident, we are required to rotate through the Bellevue Emergency Department for a solid month’s time. To describe this rotation as a …

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Why is Syphilis Still Sensitive to Penicillin?

July 30, 2009
Why is Syphilis Still Sensitive to Penicillin?

Sam Rougas MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

It seems that every week a new article in a major newspaper is reporting what most infectious disease physicians have been preaching for several years. Antibiotic resistance is rapidly spreading. Infections such as Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcal Aureus, Extremely Drug Resistant Tuberculosis, and Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus have journeyed from the intensive care units to the locker rooms of the National Football League. That being said, some bacteria have strangely and until recently inexplicably behaved. Syphilis, a disease caused by the …

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The Asian Glow: A unique screening tool to evaluate for an elevated risk of esophageal cancer

July 29, 2009
The Asian Glow: A unique screening tool to evaluate for an elevated risk of esophageal cancer

Cindy Mui MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The alcohol flushing response is a physiologic response to ingestion of alcohol and is characterized by facial flushing, nausea, tachycardia, and hypotension, felt to be due to an inherited deficiency in the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2). It is experienced by one third of East Asians and is more commonly known as the “Asian glow” or the “Asian flush”(1). Although the alcohol flushing response is generally seen as cosmetic and even embarrassing on a night out, there is evidence …

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PrimeCuts- This Week in the Journals

July 27, 2009
PrimeCuts- This Week in the Journals

Onyeka Okonkwo MD

Faculty peer reviewed

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia affecting over 4.5 million Americans, with cases in the US projected to triple over the next 40 years in the absence of advancements in therapy. With the aging of the American population, the disease has become an increasingly significant source of healthcare spending, with over 80 billion dollars dedicated annually to the care of patients with Alzheimer’s. Consequently, a number of research studies have been initiated to investigate …

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Practicing Medicine in Rural America

July 24, 2009
Practicing Medicine in Rural America

 

Erin Ducharme MD

This entry is the final in a three part series where I share highlights from my conversation with my home-town physician from rural southern Iowa. Here I discuss the medical conditions which affect this 4500 population town. I also briefly touch on maintaining privacy in a place where “Everybody knows your name (and your business)” and the incorporation of an electronic medical record system.  Please also see Part I and Part II.

Running Water and Computers too

The bread and butter diseases-congestive …

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Mystery Quiz- The Answer

July 23, 2009
Mystery Quiz- The Answer

Vivian Hayashi MD and Robert Smith MD, Mystery Quiz Section Editors

The answer to the mystery quiz is bland alveolar hemorrhage. The CXR (image 1) shows cardiomegaly with mild increase in opacification of the right middle and right lower lobes. The CT images show areas of multifocal ground glass opacification, that is, the underlying interstitium is visible through the opacification, and the variably sized opacities are widely distributed throughout the lungs (images 2, 3, and 4). Image 4 shows prominent interstitium through the ground glass. …

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