ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

January 14, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Cara Litvin MD, Executive Editor, Clinical Correlations

Published in the NEJM this week was a study intended to conclusively determine whether corticosteroids are an effective adjunctive therapy in severe sepsis. Although corticosteroid use is a widely accepted therapy for the treatment of sepsis, prior evidence supporting this practice has been lacking. In this multicenter randomized double-blind trial (CORTICUS), ICU patients were randomized to receive a full course of hydrocortisone therapy versus placebo. Corticotropin stimulation tests were performed in all patients. The…

Read more »

Class Act: Do Statins Always Have to Be Taken in the Evening?

January 10, 2008
Class Act: Do Statins Always Have to Be Taken in the Evening?

Class act is a feature of Clinical Correlations written by NYU 3rd and 4th year medical students. These posts focus on evidenced based answers to clinical questions related to patients seen by our students in the clinics or on the wards. Prior to publication, each commentary is thoroughly reviewed for content by a faculty member. Enjoy…

Commentary by David Leaf, MSIV

HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are the most powerful drugs used for lowering LDL cholesterol, with median reductions in the range of 30 to 63…

Read more »

Health Care 2008: Where Do the Candidates Stand? Part 2-Obama and Thompson

January 8, 2008
Health Care 2008: Where Do the Candidates Stand? Part 2-Obama and Thompson

In this series, we try to cut through some of the media hype and summarize the health care proposals put forward by the leading candidates for President.

Commentary by Aaron Lord MD, PGY-1

With the New Hampshire primaries upon us, there’s no time to lose! Here’s a summary of the health plans of two more candidates, Senators Barack Obama and Fred Thompson.

Barack Obama (D)

Like Hillary Clinton’s plan (see the first post in this series), as well as…

Read more »

ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

January 7, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

This week’s Annals of Internal Medicine focused on angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB). Two studies addressed questions such as: Which class (ACE/ARB or both) is more effective as an anti-hypertensive? Which class is more effective for proteinuria? What are the adverse events of the combination? What are long term outcomes?

The first article was a systematic review that compares these drugs as anti-hypertensive agents.…

Read more »

Evaluation of Asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White EKG Morphology

January 3, 2008
Evaluation of Asymptomatic Wolff-Parkinson-White EKG Morphology

Commentary by David Steckman MD, PGY-2 and William Slater MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology

Case: A 42 year-old man presents to clinic for routine follow-up. He is found to be hypertensive for the second consecutive clinic appointment. On routine EKG, you find a shortened PR interval and what looks to be a delta wave in V1-V3. The patient does not report any history of syncope, chest pain, palpitations or shortness of breath. In addition to treating his hypertension, what…

Read more »

Health Care 2008: Where Do the Candidates Stand? Part 1-Clinton and Guliani

January 2, 2008
Health Care 2008: Where Do the Candidates Stand? Part 1-Clinton and Guliani

Welcome to the first post of our newest series. In this series, we’ll try to cut through some of the media hype and summarize the health care proposals put forward by the leading candidates for President.

Commentary by Aaron Lord MD, PGY-1, and Zackary Berger MD PhD, PGY-2, Health Care Policy Section Editor

Post # 1: A Subway Series

First up in this series are New York’s Hillary Clinton (D) and Rudy Guliani (R). We’ll devote more space to Clinton’s plan…

Read more »

Clinical Question: Pharmacology

December 28, 2007
Clinical Question: Pharmacology

Is there evidence to support the use of Lantus® (human insulin analog glargine) administered Q12h in Type 1 Diabetes?

Commentary by Kathy Lee, Pharmacy Resident 

The goal of diabetes management is to reduce the risk of long-term complications by maintaining near-normal glycemic control, in addition to reducing other risk factors. Patients with type 1 diabetes have an absolute deficiency in insulin and require exogenous insulin replacement. Lantus®, human insulin analog glargine, is the only long-acting insulin that exhibits a “peakless” action profile with…

Read more »

Grand Rounds: “When Things go Wrong”

December 26, 2007
Grand Rounds: “When Things go Wrong”

Commentary by Rosemary Adamson MD, PGY-2

Medical error, the most formidable of topics, was under discussion at ground rounds this past week. Dr. Tom Delbanco visited us from Boston to show his movie about patients’ and their families’ experiences of medical errors. Dr. Delbanco graduated from Columbia Medical School and did his residency at the Columbia Medical Division at Bellevue Hospital. He then moved to Harvard where he created one of the first primary care practice and teaching programs at an academic medical center; he…

Read more »