Does Acetazolamide Prevent Altitude Sickness?

May 7, 2009
Does Acetazolamide Prevent Altitude Sickness?

Seema Pursnani MD

Because your parents have designated you as the family doctor, your Uncle Joe calls to ask you if he should take this medication called Diamox before going trekking in the Himalayas. You work at Bellevue in New York City: who climbs mountains here? What do you say?

Why do illnesses develop from changes in altitude?

The essential culprit is the fall in atmospheric pressure with an increase in altitude. While at sea level, barometric pressure (Pb) is ~760mm Hg (1atm), whereas at …

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Grand Rounds: The Role of Omega-3 fatty Acids in Rheumatoid Arthritis

May 6, 2009
Grand Rounds: The Role of Omega-3 fatty Acids in Rheumatoid Arthritis

Michael Owen MD

Please also see the clinical vignette presented before Grand Rounds on the 15th of April.

Grand rounds on April 15th was presented by Dr. Joel Kremer, Pfaff Family Professor of Medicine at Albany Medical College and Director of Research at the Center for Rheumatology. Dr. Kremer informed the NYU community about the role of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in rheumatoid arthritis.

Dr. Kremer began with an overview of fatty acid biochemistry including saturated, mono-unsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids are …

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PrimeCuts-This Week in the Journals

May 4, 2009
PrimeCuts-This Week in the Journals

Daewha Benjamin Hong, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

According to the New York Times, a genetic sequencing company called Knome is holding a charity auction on E-Bay with the winner to receive complete sequencing of their personal genome. The opening bid is $68,000, which is a bargain compared to the suggested retail price of $99,500.

But before I pull out my credit card and start bidding,, the April 23rd issue of the New England Journal of Medicine offers an interesting debate between geneticists on the utility …

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Mystery Quiz- The Answer

May 1, 2009
Mystery Quiz- The Answer

Posted by Vivian Hayashi MD and Robert Smith MD, Mystery Quiz Section Editors

The answer to the mystery quiz is sarcoidosis. The CXR shows diffuse, bilateral infiltration with a predominantly nodular pattern. The pulmonary hila are also prominent. The CT image shows innumerable 2-3mm nodules, many of which have a perilymphatic distribution. The lymphatics, in parallel with the pulmonary vasculature, course through the interstitium. Hence, the perilymphatic nodularity has an interstitial distribution and appears as “studding” along the interstitium which is enhanced by vascular contrast …

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Should we treat asymptomatic autoimmune hepatitis?

April 30, 2009
Should we treat asymptomatic autoimmune hepatitis?

Bani Chander MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a progressive, inflammatory disease of the liver of unknown etiology and may progress to cirrhosis. While it is does have a predilection for women, this disease entity crosses genders and ethnic groups, and may occur in both adults and children. AIH is characterized by a fluctuating course and is often associated with autoimmune features including hypergammaglobulinemia, circulating serum autoantibodies, and hepatitis with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration on liver biopsy . Autoimmune hepatitis is a heterogeneous disease with …

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Mystery Quiz

April 28, 2009
Mystery Quiz

Vivian Hayashi MD and Robert Smith MD, Mystery Quiz Section Editors

The patient is a 42 year old man with a history of non-productive cough for several weeks. Three weeks prior to evaluation by the pulmonary service, the patient presented to the ER with a presumed vasovagal syncopal event that occurred on a subway platform. The patient’s prior medical history included allergic sinusitis and nasal polypectomy. Other than cough, the patient denied constitutional symptoms. The patient was not taking any medications. His social history was …

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PrimeCuts- This Week in the Journals

April 27, 2009
PrimeCuts- This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Benjamin Bergman MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Weather’s getting good. But the world is still dangerous, and we have to labor against diseases, ancient as well as new. That is the message I took from this week’s journals. Also, washing those hands is probably important this week.

Cardiac surgeons and interventionalists are always working on improving post-myocardial infarction outcomes. In the STICH trial published in the NEJM, surgeons and cardiologists at multiple hospitals randomized patients to routine coronary artery bypass surgery with or without …

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Breaking News: Swine Flu Reaches New York

April 26, 2009
Breaking News: Swine Flu Reaches New York

Eunice Kang, MD

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has confirmed eight cases of swine influenza A (A/H1N1) virus infection in New York City, in addition to a dozen cases caused by the same strain scattered throughout California, Texas, Ohio, and Kansas. The eight confirmed cases in New York are in students who just returned from a trip to Mexico, where officials began reporting three separate outbreaks of influenza-like illness beginning March 18th. According to the New York Times there have been 81 deaths and …

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