Grand Rounds: “ANCA-Associated Vasculitis: Update for Internists”

April 9, 2008
Grand Rounds: “ANCA-Associated Vasculitis: Update for Internists”

Commentary by Aditya Matoo MD, PGY-2

This week’s medicine grand rounds was given by Dr. Peter Merkel, M.D., M.P.H., Associate Professor of Medicine, Section of Rheumatology and Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Boston University School of Medicine and Director, Vasculitis Center, Boston University School of Medicine.

Dr. Merkel prefaced his discussion by highlighting the evolving movement among academics to change the name of Wegener’s Granulomatosis to an alternative given recent discoveries that Friedrich Wegener had willingly volunteered and actively participated in the Nazi movement…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

April 7, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Neil Shapiro, MD, Editor in Chief, Clinical Correlations

The hot news stories this week were the early release articles highlighted at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meetings. We will save most of those stories for our upcoming summary of the meeting. Let it be said however that there is serious zetia fatigue around these parts, as the same controversial article made the rounds on the news cycles for the second time now that it was officially released. Unfortunately most of…

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The Thirty-six Million Dollar Rectal Exam

April 2, 2008
The Thirty-six Million Dollar Rectal Exam

Commentary by Zackary Berger MD PhD, PGY-2, Health Care Policy Section Editor

Medical protocol and consent on trial in the New York Supreme Court.

In 2004, while working at a construction site, Brian Persaud was hit in the head by a large wooden plank, lost consciousness, and was taken to the emergency room at New York Presbyterian Hospital. There he received what he says was an unjustified digital rectal exam. Persaud brought suit against the hospital, and soon, four years later, the…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

March 31, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Sean Cavanaugh MD, Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations

We start this week’s Shortcuts with the cheery news that another drug is being investigated for a possible association with mood disorder and suicidality. First there was Rimonbant, then Varenicline (Chantix) and now Singulair, a leukotriene receptor antagonist used primarily in children to treat asthma and allergic rhinitisis, is getting attention for a potential link with increased dysphoric mood and suicidality. The FDA announced their investigation last week but has not issued specific treatment…

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The Rational Clinical Examination: Does This Patient with Diabetes Have Osteomyelitis of the Lower Extremity?

March 28, 2008
The Rational Clinical Examination: Does This Patient with Diabetes Have Osteomyelitis of the Lower Extremity?

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

The most recent installment in JAMA’s Rational Clinical Exam Series seeks to determine the accuracy of the history, physical exam, radiology and laboratory in making the diagnosis of osteomyelitis in diabetics. This is relevant given its frequency of occurrence and its cost and since the gold standard for diagnosis, namely a bone biopsy and culture, is less than optimal for a variety of reasons.

Less than 10% of the…

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Noninvasive Cardiac Imaging: Coronary CT Angiography

March 26, 2008
Noninvasive Cardiac Imaging: Coronary CT Angiography

Commentary by Matt LaBarbera MD, PGY-3 and Rob Donnino, MD Instructor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology

Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is a noninvasive imaging modality which can be used to evaluate the anatomy of the coronary arteries. Unlike coronary artery calcium scoring, which utilizes noncontrast CT to assess atherosclerotic disease burden, CCTA allows direct visualization of the coronary artery wall and lumen with the administration of intravenous contrast. The degree of coronary luminal stenosis can be reliably estimated, as can the presence or absence…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

March 25, 2008
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Henry Tran MD

The seasons of the year, like governors of New York, change quickly. And with that, we welcome the new spring, a time of rebirth and renewal!

Well sticking with the spring theme, it seems “newer blood” might be safer than “older blood.” There has been evidence to suggest that during storage, red blood cells undergo functional and structural changes which impair RBC function (termed “storage lesion”). A retrospective study from Cleveland Clinic published in the NEJM examined…

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Class Act: Are beta-blockers really contraindicated for patients with a diagnosis of reactive airway disease?

March 21, 2008
Class Act: Are beta-blockers really contraindicated for patients with a diagnosis of reactive airway disease?

Commentary by Katherine Khvilivitzky, NYU Medical Student

Class act is a feature of Clinical Correlations written by NYU 3rd and 4th year medical students. These posts focus on evidenced based answers to clinical questions related to patients seen by our students in the clinics or on the wards. Prior to publication, each commentary is thoroughly reviewed for content by a faculty member.

In the past, reactive airway disease was considered to be a contraindication to administration of all beta-blockers including ophthalmic preparations.…

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