Myths and Realities: Is Breakfast the Most Important Meal of the Day?

June 18, 2009
Myths and Realities: Is Breakfast the Most Important Meal of the Day?

Chau Che MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

In an age when two thirds of adults are either overweight or obese and obesity rates in children continue to rise, would an intervention such as consuming breakfast daily help combat this problem? Skipping breakfast has become increasingly common in adults and adolescents in the United States, with the proportion of adults and children skipping breakfast increasing from fourteen to twenty-five percent between 1965 and 1991 (1,3). Additionally, skipping breakfast may be detrimental to other functions. To examine the …

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Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Premature Coronary Artery Disease

June 17, 2009
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Premature Coronary Artery Disease

Ishmeal  Bradley MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Ms. W is a 35 yo woman with a history of systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosed 10 years ago. Her only medications are hydroxychloroquine and prednisone for occasional disease flares. She is otherwise healthy. She has no known personal or family history of cardiac disease or stroke, but does smoke ½ pack of cigarettes per day. Currently, she denies any chest pain, shortness of breath, urinary symptoms, lower extremity edema, or menstrual irregularities, but does report occasional mild joint pain …

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PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

June 15, 2009
PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

Aditya Matoo MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The New York Times was on our case again this week reminding us (meaning Americans) of our poor lifestyle habits. They reported that middle-aged Americans are eating fewer fruits and vegetables, drinking more alcohol, exercising less, and, as we all know, becoming more obese, according to a study published in the American Journal of Medicine.Admittedly…mea culpa. With the long hours and late nights of residency, it’s pretty difficult to eat well and exercise as much as we preach to …

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HotSpots: Evidence Based Patient Websites

June 13, 2009
HotSpots: Evidence Based Patient Websites

Welcome to HotSpots. In this series, we highlight unique websites of interest to the medical profession. Feel free to make suggestions for sites that should be featured in this series by clicking the comment field or sending us an email.

Rebecca Hall MD

More and more patients are going online to read about their medical conditions. Patients may not be able to distinguish reputable evidence based medical sites from gimmick type websites promising expensive, useless “cures” and “vitamins” and providing faulty “medical” advice. Having a …

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How Should You Approach a Patient Co-infected with HIV and Hepatitis C?

June 11, 2009
How Should You Approach a Patient Co-infected with HIV and Hepatitis C?

Uzma Sarwar MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

With advancement in therapy, life expectancy has significantly increased among HIV-infected patients, and patients are now more likely to succumb to chronic disease processes. At present, approximately one third of deaths in HIV patients are related to liver disease, which has become the leading cause of death amongst HIV patients. The risk of death from liver disease in HIV patients is inversely related to their CD4 count. Infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) accounts for the bulk of this …

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Grand Rounds: Genomic Medicine: Hope, Hype and Reality

June 10, 2009
Grand Rounds: Genomic Medicine: Hope, Hype and Reality

Kristen Lee MD

Please also see the clinical vignette presented before Grand Rounds on the 13th of May.

The Medical Grand Rounds lecture on May 13, 2009 titled “ Genomic Medicine: Hope, Hype and Reality” was presented by Dr. Robert Desnick, M.D., Ph. D. Professor and Chair of the Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

Dr. Desnick began with therapeutic revolutions in the 20th century which include the discovery of antibiotics, vaccines, transplant medicine, laporoscopic and robotic surgeries …

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PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

June 8, 2009
PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

Kathir Palanisamy MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Let’s start the week with an update about the swine flu before turning our attention to tuberculosis. The New York Times reported on 6/5/09 that there have been 623 confirmed cases, 375 hospitalizations, and eight confirmed deaths linked to the swine flu in the U.S. To put that into perspective, the seasonal flu claims 1000 lives, on average. NYC health officials continue to urge those citizens with complicating medical factors as well as those with severe symptoms to seek …

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Commentary on Conscientious Objection in Medicine: A Moral Dilemma

June 5, 2009
Commentary on Conscientious Objection in Medicine: A Moral Dilemma

The following is a commentary  on last week’s post, Conscientious Objection in Medicine: A Moral Dilemma, written by Dr. Bradley.

 Commentary by Antonella Surbone, MD PhD FACP, Ethics Editor

The piece by Dr. Bradley raises a highly controversial issue in today’s medicine, physicians’ conscientious objection. Dr. Bradley reviews recent legislature, as well as medical literature, including the underlying ethical argumentation. Unfortunately, the key issue of ethical and moral justification for conscientious objection in medicine is unlikely to be resolved through abstract debate and argumentation, no …

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