Clinical Pathology Conference 9/14/07

September 11, 2007
Clinical Pathology Conference 9/14/07

Case presentation by Danise Schiliro-Chuang MD, Chief Resident

Welcome to the monthly posting of our NYU Department of Medicine’s Clinical Pathology Conference. Use the links below to review the case and the radiological findings. Our faculty and medical students will be attempting to diagnose this unknown case Friday 9/14/07 in the 17 West Conference Room at Bellevue Hospital. Feel free to make your diagnosis by clicking the comment field below. For those who are unable to attend the live conference, we will reveal…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

September 10, 2007
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Judith Brenner MD, Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

Anemia is very common in ICU patients, but whether to treat this anemia and prevent the need for transfusions is currently unknown. Previous reports have actually suggested a decreased likelihood of survival associated with red cell transfusions. This week’s lead article in NEJM reports on a prospective, randomized placebo-controlled trial in which 1500 critically ill patients were treated with epoetin alfa vs placebo for up to 3 weeks. There was…

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An Update on Domestic Violence

September 6, 2007
An Update on Domestic Violence

Commentary by Sean Cavanaugh MD, Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations

Most doctors are aware that Domestic Violence, or Intimate Partner Violence (IPV), is a serious health care issue, but the statistics are still startling to most of us. Some surveys have reported that IPV affects up to 30% of women and up to 7.5% of men. These numbers are highly variable and depend on the type of survey being conducted and the population being surveyed. Actual report-statistics of IPV are widely acknowledged as…

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Shortcuts-This Week in the Journals

September 5, 2007
Shortcuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Michael Poles MD, Associate Editor Clinical Correlations

The latest estimates from the US Census Bureau suggest that the number of uninsured Americans has increased from 44.8 million in 2005 to roughly 47 million in 2006. This jump of 5 percent is the largest one-year increase in the number of uninsured since 2002. In that year, more than 18,000 American deaths were attributable to the lack of insurance and proper health care.

Physicians commonly look to systematic reviews to obtain current…

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CPC 8-17-07 The Answer

August 31, 2007

Case Presentation By: Marshall Fordyce, Senior Chief Resident

Please review the posting of the CPC case.

When you’re ready you can download the CPC Answer.

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X Ray Visions Mystery Quiz- The Answer

August 30, 2007
X Ray Visions Mystery Quiz- The Answer

Before you read the answer, you may want to review the initial Mystery Quiz posted last week.

Commentary by Andrew Hardie MD, Fellow, NYU Department of Radiology

Although this patient’s symptoms were not the most typical of this entity, the CT findings in this case are diagnostic of a perforated anterior duodenal ulcer. The most essential observation, and the one that alters management, is the presence of intraabdominal free air (arrows). The small collections of air in this case are not unusual for bowel perforations,…

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Inpatient Diabetes Management: Case 1

August 28, 2007
Inpatient Diabetes Management: Case 1

Commentary by Mary Vouyiouklis MD, Fellow, and Ann Danoff MD, Director, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, NYU Medical Center

Welcome to our special diabetes series intended to highlight the essentials of diabetes care in the inpatient setting. For the next several weeks, we plan to present individual cases followed by some management questions and answers.

Case 1: The case of Mr. Smith
Mr. Smith is a 65 year old obese male admitted to the hospital with acute renal…

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ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

August 27, 2007
ShortCuts-This Week in the Journals

Commentary by Josh Olstein MD, Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations

This week, the most popular health-care related story in the lay press was the news about Medicare’s plan to no longer cover the additional costs of treatment for many hospital-related complications such as catheter related infections and decubiti. The plan drew sweeping support from consumer advocacy groups who welcome any policy that would lead to increased patient safety and quickly caught the attention of hospital administrators and physicians. Administrators were unsurprisingly wary of the…

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