Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

August 19, 2013
Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

By: Kelly Forrester, MD

At Fenway Park on Sunday, after hitting a 6th inning home run that led the Yankees to a victory against the Red Sox, Alex Rodriguez made the ultimate statement to angry officials and fans that he is not going to give in.  Rodriguez has been under fire since January because of his ties to the Biogenesis baseball scandal where he was accused of using performance-enhancing drugs.  On August 5th, Rodriguez was suspended for 211 games, although he is allowed…

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Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

August 13, 2013
Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

By: Theresa Sumberac, MD

What do the polio vaccine, in vitro fertilization, and gene mapping have in common? Their successes are all due, in varying extents, to the use of HeLa cells. HeLa cells were originally derived from a self-replicating cell line obtained unknowingly 65 years ago from Henrietta Lacks, a woman battling an aggressive form of cervical cancer. Researchers soon realized the potential of these cells, which have been referenced in over 74,000 studies to date. Concern by Ms. Lacks’ descendants erupted in the…

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From The Archives: Does Heyde Syndrome Exist?

August 8, 2013
From The Archives: Does Heyde Syndrome Exist?

Please enjoy this post from the Archives dated September 29, 2010

By Lara Dunn, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

In 1958, EC Heyde published 10 cases of aortic stenosis (AS) and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the gastrointestinal tract in the New England Journal of Medicine . Thus, the association between aortic stenosis and intestinal angiodysplasia became known as Heyde Syndrome. Yet the existence of this syndrome has been controversial.

Contrasting conclusions have been obtained by studies conducted to evaluate this association. In a prospective study, Bhutani…

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Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

August 6, 2013
Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

By: Matthew Weiss, MD

Though Don Draper publicly explained to us “Why I’m Quitting Tobacco” as far back as 1965, we’re still collectively dealing with the repercussions of those smokers, Don included, who didn’t follow his sage advice. Lung cancer today, 85% of which is attributable to cigarette use, makes up more than a quarter of all cancer deaths and claims roughly 160,000 American lives yearly – more than the toll from colorectal, breast and prostate cancers combined . Nearly 90 percent of patients with…

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Book Review: What Doctors Feel-Danielle Ofri, MD

August 2, 2013
Book Review: What Doctors Feel-Danielle Ofri, MD

By Michael Tanner, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

What Doctors Feel, Danielle Ofri’s answer to Jerome Groopman’s How Doctors Think, explores how doctors’ emotions affect the practice of medicine in good and bad ways. As the saxophone virtuoso Charlie Parker said, “If you don’t live it, it won’t come out of your horn.” Dr. Ofri has lived it, in a career more varied than most—as a rape crisis counselor, a neuroanatomy teaching assistant, a cellist, a PhD in neuroscience, and a professor and practitioner of internal…

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Why You Should Think Twice About Using Medical Abbreviations

July 31, 2013
Why You Should Think Twice About Using Medical Abbreviations

By Benjamin Rodwin

Faculty Peer Reviewed

It seems like a simple enough history: an 18 year old with a past medical history significant for GBS. They probably gave him some antibiotics for a Group B Strep infection and sent him home. Or did he need IVIG (that’s intravenous immunoglobulin) and plasmapheresis for Guillain-Barré syndrome? When a patient is prescribed MS will he receive morphine sulfate or magnesium sulfate? Abbreviations, used to save time and space, have become ubiquitous in prescriptions and medical records. However, they…

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

July 29, 2013
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Arnab Ghosh, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

This week’s Clinical Correlations begins with news from across the ‘pond’ and the much-anticipated birth of Prince George of Cambridge. The third in line to crown of the English monarchy, behind his grandfather Prince Charles and father Prince William the Prince George, George Alexander Louis was born on the 22rd of July 2013. The last use of the name, commonly represented in the history of the British monarchy, was by the Queen’s father, King George VI. It is…

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Not for Human Consumption: Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists As An Emerging Drug Of Abuse

July 26, 2013
Not for Human Consumption: Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists As An Emerging Drug Of Abuse

By Ryland Pace

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Cannabinoid receptor agonists (CRAs) have been recently popularized as “legal” alternatives to marijuana and are becoming increasingly common, especially among teens and young adults. These new artificial “highs” consist of a blend of various dried herbs, spices and plant material that have been sprayed with one or more CRAs and are sold under names like Spice, K2, Mr. Smiley, Mr. Nice Guy, Black Mamba, Purple Haze, Spice Gold, and Smoke .

CRAs are thought to have first appeared in…

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