Quick Thinking Part 2

April 6, 2007
Quick Thinking Part 2

Welcome to Quick Thinking a new feature of Clinical Correlations. A case will be presented in short sections to a faculty expert who will comment on their approach to the patient as the case unfolds. These posts will focus on the thought process involved in determining the initial differential diagnoses and diagnostic workups of complicated patient presentations.

Part 1 can be found here.

Part 2 of Case Presentation By:Elizabeth Ross PGY-3

He was originally seen at Elmhurst Hospital and transferred to Bellevue Hospital.  On presentation…

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Meeting Perspectives: The 2007 American College of Cardiology Scientific Session

April 5, 2007
Meeting Perspectives: The 2007 American College of Cardiology Scientific Session

Commentary By: Steven Sedlis, MD Associate Professor of Medicine, Chief, Division of Cardiology Manhattan Veterans Administration Medical Center

The 56th annual scientific session of the American College of Cardiology was held in New Orleans on March 24-27.  The site of the meeting had been selected before hurricane Katrina; the ACC re-affirmed its commitment last year when the devastation caused by the storm was still fresh and when future prospects for southern Louisiana were still uncertain. The ACC meeting was by far the largest…

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Book Review: How Doctors Think-Jerome Groopman, MD

April 3, 2007
Book Review: How Doctors Think-Jerome Groopman, MD

Commentary By David Shapiro, MD, Former Chief of Allergy and Immunology, Winthrop University Medical Center and New York Ear Infirmary Hospital, Attending Physician OPD Allergy and Immunology, New York Hospital (and most importantly, father of Neil Shapiro, MD)

I highly recommend a new book that has become an instant bestseller, How Doctors Think published two weeks ago by Houghton Mifflin. The author, Dr. Jerome Groopman, is Professor of Medicine (Oncology and Immunology) at Harvard School of Medicine and Chief of Experimental Medicine at…

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ShortCuts: This Week in the Journals

April 2, 2007
ShortCuts: This Week in the Journals

JAMA reported on two important “negative” trials: The results of the EVEREST trial, comparing tolvaptan (a novel vasopressin V2 receptor blocker) to placebo for the treatment of acute CHF exacerbation, indicate that this agent had no effect on the primary endpoint of all-cause mortality or the composite endpoint of cardiovascular death, hospitalization for heart failure; secondary endpoints were also not effected. The TRIUMPH trial looked at the effect of tilarginine (an isoform-nonselective NOS inhibitor) in patients with MI and refractory cardiogenic shock and…

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Quick Thinking #1

March 30, 2007
Quick Thinking #1

Welcome to Quick Thinking a new feature of Clinical Correlations. A case will be presented piece by piece to a faculty expert who will comment on their approach to the case as it unfolds. Differential diagnoses and diagnostic workups will form the basis of these posts of difficult clinical cases. So for the next 4 Fridays we present our first case to our discussant Mitchell Charap:

The Case Presented by Elizabeth Ross, PGY-3: The patient is a 35 year old African American male…

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First Direct Renin Inhibitor Approved for Hypertension

March 29, 2007
First Direct Renin Inhibitor Approved for Hypertension

Commentary By: Josh Olstein, PGY-3

Earlier this month the FDA approved Tekturna (aliskiren) the first drug in a novel class of antihypertensives that work by directly inhibiting renin. While Novartis has yet to release pricing information, don’t expect to see this new addition on the Bellevue or VA formulary any time soon.

The idea of treating hypertension by blocking the actions of renin has been toyed with by pharmaceutical companies for over twenty years with little success. Aliskiren is the first agent…

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The COURAGE Trial: PCI is not superior to medical therapy in patients with stable coronary disease

March 27, 2007
The COURAGE Trial:  PCI is not superior to medical therapy in patients with stable coronary disease

Commentary by Cara Litvin, PGY-3

The results of one of the more remarkable studies from the meeting of the American College of Cardiology were presented on Monday, along with the simultaneous early publishing of the study online in the New England Journal of Medicine. As a result the study results captured a front page article in today’s New York Times.

The COURAGE (Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive Drug Evaluation) trial was a randomized trial involving 2287 patients with stable but significant coronary artery disease…

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Notice: Med-Surg Conference Thursday 3/29 in the Saul Farber Auditorium, Bellevue Hospital

March 27, 2007
Notice: Med-Surg Conference Thursday 3/29 in the Saul Farber Auditorium, Bellevue Hospital

Our next med-surg conference is Thursday March 29 at 4:30pm. It will be comprised of two heated debates. The first will be a debate over the need for surgery in asymptomatic patients with a severe carotid artery stenosis featuring Greg Mints, MD and vascular surgeon, Thomas Riles, MD The second debate will answer the question of whether there is a need for bone biopsy in the treatment of osteomyelitis. Pro: Harold Horowitz, MD from ID Con: Nirmal Tejwani, MD from orthopedics. We look forward to seeing you there.…

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