Safety of Long-Acting Beta-Agonists in the Treatment of Asthma: Should they be used?

February 21, 2007
Safety of Long-Acting Beta-Agonists in the Treatment of Asthma: Should they be used?

Commentary By: Sarah Huen, PGY-3 and David Chong, Director of Critical Care, Bellevue Hospital, Associate NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program Director

The role of long-acting b-agonists (LABAs) in the treatment of asthma continues to be controversial. Growing evidence that LABAs may cause an increased risk of asthma exacerbations and asthma-related deaths prompted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to approve “black box” safety warning labels for Serevent Diskus (salmeterol xinafoate), Advair Diskus (fluticasone propionate; salmeterol xinafoate), and Foradil (formoterol fumarate). Concern about…

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Evolution of a Blog-Clinical Correlations 2.0

February 20, 2007
Evolution of a Blog-Clinical Correlations 2.0

You may have noticed a few changes here at Clinical Correlations. First if you look at the top of the page we have a great new logo created by a professional graphics arts designer. Second, if you look just below the logo, there is now a link to a page entitled The Essential Reading Lists. This link takes you to a bibliography listing the essential articles as picked by our faculty members of the NYU Internal Medicine Curriculum Committee. The lists do not yet include…

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Should patients with Anemia and a Normal Ferritin Undergo Colonoscopy?

February 16, 2007
Should patients with Anemia and a Normal Ferritin Undergo Colonoscopy?

Commentary By: Joshua Olstein PGY-3

Second only to lung cancer, colon cancer claimed an estimated 55,000 lives in the United States in 2006. In an effort to reduce colon cancer morbidity and mortality, multiple screening tests have been developed to detect early disease among asymptomatic individuals. The 2003 American Gastroenterology Associations guidelines for screening asymptomatic individuals recommended colonoscopy as a preferred method of screening.

Due to a higher risk of colonic neoplasm, patients with unexplained iron-deficiency anemia are not included in these…

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PB&J Hold the P: Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Peanut Butter

February 15, 2007
PB&J Hold the P: Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Peanut Butter

Commentary By: Cara Litvin PGY-3

 

The CDC has issued a public health advisory regarding a large outbreak of Salmonella infections in 39 states since August. As of Tuesday February 14, 288 cases had been reported to the CDC. Among the 120 patients for whom clinical information is available, 31 patients have been hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported. The most cases have been reported in New York, Pennsylvania,…

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Will the VeinViewer Make the Blind Stick a Historical Footnote?

February 13, 2007
Will the VeinViewer Make the Blind Stick a Historical Footnote?

Yes our housestaff is no longer the first line when blood or an iv is needed. However, maybe these tasks wouldn’t be such a big deal if this invention from the company Luminetx takes off. It uses light emitting diodes to beam near infrared light onto the skin, and can visualize blood vessels up to 8 mm below the surface. The light source emits a harmless, near-infrared light reflected back to the surface from the tissue surrounding the vein, while no light is…

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What Is XDR-TB?

February 12, 2007
What Is XDR-TB?

Commentary By: Marshall Fordyce, PGY-3

Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) is as ominous as it sounds. As a second-year resident on the Chest service, you may have treated one or two patients with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), which is resistant to at least INH (Isoniazide) and RIF (Rifampin), the two most powerful first-line agents. However, when TB becomes designated as XDR-TB, it implies resistance to any and all Fluoroquinolones and at least one of the three injectable second-line drugs (Amikacin, Capreomycin, and Kanamycin).…

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More Smoke From the Tobacco Industry

February 8, 2007
More Smoke From the Tobacco Industry

Commentary By: Elizabeth Ross, PGY-3

Cigarette manufacturers have been steadily increasing the nicotine content in cigarettes over the last 7 years.  The news broke in August of this year when the Massachusetts Department of Public Health discovered that the level of nicotine that smokers typically consume per cigarette had risen about 10 percent.

The Harvard School of Public Health recently re-analyzed the data with the goal of ascertaining how the tobacco industry managed the increase in nicotine content.  The investigators found…

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How Should You Approach A Patient with an Incidental Finding of a Portal Vein Thrombosis?

February 7, 2007
How Should You Approach A Patient with an Incidental Finding of a Portal Vein Thrombosis?

A  70 year old man  with a history of prostate cancer, status post radiation treatment in August 2003, a history of abdominal surgery for unknown reasons, and a history of heavy alcohol use was seen at the VA.   The patient was referred for a complaint of bright red blood per rectum and was incidentally noted to have elevated liver enzymes. 

Colonoscopy revealed blood in the rectosigmoid, dilated vessels in the rectum and angioectasia, thought to be secondary to the radiation…

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