From The Archives: The Effect of Bariatric Surgery on Incretin Hormones and Glucose Homeostasis

October 13, 2016
From The Archives: The Effect of Bariatric Surgery on Incretin Hormones and Glucose Homeostasis

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated April 4, 2013

By Michael Crist

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Until recently, little thought was given to the important role played by the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum in glucose homeostasis. The involvement of the gut in glucose regulation is mediated by the enteroinsular axis, which refers to the neural and hormonal signaling pathways that connect the gastrointestinal (GI) tract with pancreatic beta cells. These pathways are largely responsible for the increase in insulin that occurs during the postprandial …

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Why It Isn’t So Cool To Go Gluten-Free

October 12, 2016
Why It Isn’t So Cool To Go Gluten-Free

Chloe Cipora Goldman, MD

Peer Reviewed

During a recent encounter with a 32 year-old female presenting for surgical clearance for knee surgery, the patient touted that she was in superb health, exercised daily, and even followed a “healthy” gluten-free diet, despite not having celiac disease. This patient is one of the millions of Americans that have jumped on the gluten-free bandwagon, which has been made popular with the help of athlete and celebrity endorsements. The idea that gluten is something that should be avoided has …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

October 10, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Samir Bhalla, MD

Peer Reviewed

October is upon us, which typically is notable for cooler weather, pumpkin spice lattes and playoff baseball. The focus this year, however, is the upcoming presidential election. Last week, Governor Mike Pence and Senator Tim Kaine faced off in the Vice Presidential debate at Longwood University in Virginia. Kaine was on the offensive, frequently bringing up many of the highly contested ideals and proposals of Donald Trump, while Pence did his best to refute these points. Many polls including …

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Wedge

October 7, 2016
Wedge

By Kyra Edson

Peer Reviewed

Wedges are triangular tools that have traditionally been used to split wood along the grain. The mechanical advantage of a wedge is its ability to accomplish this split with less force and less waste of material. Its tapered end is snugly secured inside a small defect, and then a force is applied in order to separate a piece of wood neatly and precisely.

As a medical student at the Manhattan Veterans Affairs hospital, I witnessed this powerful tool wreak havoc …

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From The Archives: Have a Cow? How Recent Studies on Red Meat Consumption Apply to Clinical Practice

October 6, 2016
From The Archives: Have a Cow? How Recent Studies on Red Meat Consumption Apply to Clinical Practice

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated, April 12, 2013

By Tyler R. McClintock

Faculty Peer Reviewed

“Red Meat Kills.” “Red Meat a Ticket to Early Grave.” “A Hot Dog a Day Raises Risk of Dying.” Such were the headlines circulating in popular press last year when the Annals of Internal Medicine released details of an upcoming article out of Frank Hu’s research group at the Harvard School of Public Health . Analyzing long-term prospective data from two large cohort studies, researchers found that …

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PCSK9 Inhibitors: Who Could Need More than a Statin?

October 5, 2016
PCSK9 Inhibitors: Who Could Need More than a Statin?

By Rhodes Hambrick

Peer Reviewed

The atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk associated with hyperlipidemia (HLD), readily apparent from the Framingham Heart Study1 of the mid-20th century, has been the target of innumerable attempted pharmacologic interventions ever since. One class of agents, the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins, became – and have remained2 – the gold standard for managing HLD-associated ASCVD risk in the setting of the remarkably favorable findings of multiple studies in the 1990s.3-5 While other agents, including niacin, fish oil, and fibrates, have …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

October 4, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Ian Henderson, MD

Peer Reviewed

This past week Donald Trump and Hilary Clinton took part in the first presidential debate of the 2016 elections. Held at Hofstra University in Long Island, NY, the debate was met with much anticipation and many questions. In between the sniffles, shimmies, microphone malfunctions, fact checking, and high volume interruptions the candidates discussed several pressing issues including the country’s economic future, race relations, and national security. While at first many were hesitant to declare a winner, a Washington Post-ABC …

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A Brief History of Early Medical Photography

September 30, 2016
A Brief History of Early Medical Photography

By Emily Milam, MD

Peer reviewed

The history of medical photography is rich and tracks the evolution of both technology and medicine. Photography’s application to medicine has become increasingly multifaceted with the advent of digital photography, smartphones, telemedicine, and the ease of photo sharing and storage. Its use has been of huge benefit since the more rudimentary days of oral communication, written description, moulage, and hand-drawn illustrations. Photography was among the first wave of medical documentation in which the subject’s condition could be more objectively …

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