Medical Eponyms: Recognizing the Medical Greats

June 11, 2014
Medical Eponyms: Recognizing the Medical Greats

By David Kudlowitz, MD

Peer Reviewed

Whether assessing for a Babinski sign, listening to Korotkoff sounds, or diagnosing Wolf-Parkinson-White Syndrome, we are surrounded by names of the medical greats in day-to-day medical practice. Medical eponyms for diseases, physical exam signs, procedures, and anatomic parts are considered by many practitioners to be tributes to their physician discoverers. However, over the past several years there has been an increasing resistance to the excessive use of eponyms, especially those associated with Nazi physicians . A compilation of medical…

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

June 9, 2014
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Mark Adelman, MD

Peer Reviewed

This week marked the anniversaries of several major events in 20th century world history. June 4th was the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square Massacre, during which the Chinese military forcibly removed pro-democracy protestors that had been camped outside of Beijing’s Forbidden City. Estimates vary widely due to the Chinese government’s official prohibition on public discussion of the events, but anywhere from a few hundred to several thousand people were killed in the process . Seventy years ago on…

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Caffeine and the Risk of Atrial Fibrillation

June 6, 2014
Caffeine and the Risk of Atrial Fibrillation

By Joshua Michael Lader, MD

Peer Reviewed

As physicians, we are frequently asked to weigh-in on dinnertime discussions about topics that, despite their relevance to everyday life, were never formally addressed in our medical training. For example, at a recent family gathering the conversation turned to a 78 year-old uncle who was recently diagnosed with atrial fibrillation. While this uncle had longstanding and likely poorly controlled hypertension, he would also typically drink 4 to 5 cups of coffee between breakfast and lunch. The debate then…

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The Rise in Tick-Borne Diseases: Is Climate Change Responsible?

June 4, 2014
The Rise in Tick-Borne Diseases: Is Climate Change Responsible?

By Nadia Jafar

Peer Reviewed

As a resident of Connecticut, I grew up acutely aware of tick-borne diseases. Nonetheless, I was surprised to see at least 3 cases of tick-borne infections during the month of my Medicine clerkship. This drove me to research the incidence of tick-borne diseases, specifically in the US, and the possible factors contributing to their increased prevalence.

In 1998, the list of reportable tick-borne pathogens in the US included Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, Lyme disease, human granulocytic ehrlichiosis/anaplasmosis, and human…

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

June 2, 2014
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Ian Henderson, MD

Peer Reviewed

In the week after honoring those who have passed while serving our country, the challenges facing our nation’s veterans have become increasingly evident. The recent controversy and frustrations with delayed care of veterans culminated on Friday with the resignation of Secretary of The Department of Veteran Affairs, Eric Shinseki . After an internal audit of the department’s health system showed chronic delays in care, manipulated waiting lists, and a scheduling scandal, President Barack Obama met with the Secretary on…

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Are Probiotics Effective In Preventing Clostridium Difficile Associated Diarrhea?

May 30, 2014
Are Probiotics Effective In Preventing Clostridium Difficile Associated Diarrhea?

By Theresa Sumberac, MD

Peer Reviewed

Antibiotic associated diarrhea is a common complication of antibiotic therapy, occurring in 5% to 39% of all patients receiving treatment. Nearly one third of these cases are attributed to the gram –positive spore forming rod, Clostridium difficile . A primary Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD) is estimated to add $2871 to $4846 to in hospital costs while a recurrent infection is estimated to cost $13,655 to $18,067 . The emergence of the hyper-virulent NAP1/B1/027 strain of C. difficile together…

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

May 27, 2014
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Matthew Vorsanger, MD

Peer Reviewed

As we spend time with family and friends on this beautiful Memorial Day weekend, we also ponder the senseless and tragic killings recently committed in Isla Vista, California. Between the interviews of experts, eyewitnesses, and acquaintances of the killer and the victims, we are left to wonder how these tragedies can be prevented in the future . With the health of our nation in mind, we also turn to recently published advancements in medical literature in this week’s PrimeCuts.…

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Gay Men, Barebacking and the New Little Blue Pill: The awkward interface of medicine and gay sex.

May 23, 2014
Gay Men, Barebacking and the New Little Blue Pill: The awkward interface of medicine and gay sex.

By Richard E. Greene, MD

Peer Reviewed

In July of 2012, the FDA approved the use of Tenofovir-Emtricitabine (Truvada, a single blue pill) daily as Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) in men with persistent risk for contracting HIV infection. The idea of PrEP has ignited a firestorm of concern among healthcare providers about how, when and in whom to use PrEP, if at all. Indeed, some believe that PrEP will usher in a new era of drug resistant new infections with HIV, or encourage men on…

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