Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

October 19, 2015
Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

By Abinav Baweja, MD

This past week we witnessed the first democratic national debate, where Hillary Rodham Clinton quieted doubters with her strong showing and minimized talk regarding her e-mail account. Meanwhile, ex-NBA player Lamar Odom was found unconscious in a brothel in Las Vegas where he had been using herbal analogs of Viagra and cocaine, and is presently in critical condition. Amidst all this news, we move on to some of the latest findings in the medical literature…

Is remote ischemic preconditioning beneficial for

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Beta-blockers in Uncomplicated Hypertension: Is it Time for Retirement?

October 7, 2015
Beta-blockers in Uncomplicated Hypertension: Is it Time for Retirement?

By Robin Guo, MD

Peer Reviewed 

Beta-blockers were one of the first modern medications used for the treatment of blood pressure. Before 1950, treatment options for hypertension were limited. The alphabet soup of medications—reserpine, pentaquine, hydralazine, and guanethidine—were notorious for inducing orthostasis, sedation, constipation, impotence, or blurry vision . Then in the 1960s, propranolol and chlorothiazide were developed. Initially designed to treat angina pectoris, propranolol was serendipitously discovered to also lower blood pressure. Oddly, propranolol, like the other beta-blockers in its generation and thereafter, did …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

October 5, 2015
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

Olivia Begasse de Dhaem, MD

Peer Reviewed  

Last month, Turing Pharmaceutical bought the rights to pyrimethamine, also known as Daraprim, and subsequently raised its price significantly (from $13.5 to $750 per tablet). Unlike Rodelis Therapeutics who gave back cycloserine when facing resistance, Turing Pharmaceuticals are determined to keep their newly increased price for Daraprim. The new trend in the pharmaceutical world of acquiring old medications and increasing their prices has led to controversy on whether the government should take action in regulating pharmaceutical prices and …

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From The Archives: Does the BCG Vaccine Really Work?

October 1, 2015
From The Archives: Does the BCG Vaccine Really Work?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated March 14, 2012

By Mitchell Kim

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an acid-fast bacillus, is the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), an infection that causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. A highly contagious infection, TB is spread by aerosolized pulmonary droplet nuclei containing the infective organism. Most infections manifest as pulmonary disease, but TB is also known to cause meningitis, vertebral osteomyelitis, and other systemic diseases through hematogenous dissemination. In 2009, there were an estimated 9.4 million …

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HDL Quantity, Necessary But Not Sufficient For Cardioprotection

September 30, 2015
HDL Quantity, Necessary But Not Sufficient For Cardioprotection

By Kerrilynn Carney, MD

Peer Reviewed

Coronary heart disease remains the leading cause of death globally despite the use of statin therapy. Although major statin studies suggest an average 31% reduction in relative risk of coronary events, a residual risk of 69% remains to be addressed. (1) The search for a medical therapy to ameliorate residual risk has become the holy grail of cardiologists and pharmaceutical companies alike. While high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (HDL) independently predict cardiovascular disease risk, interventions to raise circulating HDL levels …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

September 28, 2015
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

Viola Davis accepts the award for Outstanding Lead Actress In A Drama Series for her role in ABC’s “How To Get Away With Murder” during the 67th Primetime Emmy Awards in Los Angeles, California September 20, 2015. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

By Jacob J. Spinner, MD

Peer Reviewed

Last week Viola Davis made history as the first black woman to win an Emmy for Best Actress in a Drama. In accepting her award, she gave a moving speech on opportunity and bias against women of color . …

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There’s an App for That: Fitness Apps and Behavior Change Theory

September 18, 2015
There’s an App for That: Fitness Apps and Behavior Change Theory

By Alyson Kaplan

Peer Reviewed

According to recent reports by the CDC, more than one-third (78.6 million) of American adults are obese. Approximately 17% (12.7 million) of children and adolescents ages 2-19 also meet criteria for obesity . Obesity-related health conditions, including diabetes, heart disease, certain types of cancer, and stroke are among the leading causes of preventable death. Yet, obesity is not the sole contributor to these diseases. Other health risk behaviors, including smoking, alcohol abuse, and lack of physical activity all interact to …

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Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

September 16, 2015
Primecuts-This Week in the Journals

By: Miguel A. Saldivar

Last week, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), in conjunction with the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) announced the premature ending of what is now being dubbed a landmark study: the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) . Preliminary results showed that, in adults over the age of 50, a target systolic blood pressure of 120 mm Hg could reduce the risk of cardiovascular events by almost a third and the risk of death by almost a quarter. But …

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