Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

January 26, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Hannah Park, MD

Peer Reviewed

The winter storm Jonas was a much buzzed about topic for days leading up to its arrival this past weekend, and it truly lived up to its billing as an extraordinary weather event. Jonas now claims status as the second-largest storm in New York City history, with 27 inches of snowfall having rapidly accumulated during Saturday (1). Along with the declaration of state of emergency, Jonas single-handedly paralyzed NYC transit, prompting a complete travel ban on road traffic. As …

Read more »

Hirudotherapy: An Ugly Means of Avoiding Uglier Outcomes

January 22, 2016
Hirudotherapy: An Ugly Means of Avoiding Uglier Outcomes

By Jonathan Bekisz

Peer Reviewed

“Do you want to see something gross? Go into the soiled utility room and check out what’s in the jar.” Never one to pass on the opportunity to “see something gross,” I poked my head in and examined the tiny glass jar that sat on the counter. Living up to its billing, within the container sat about a half dozen leeches. Contrary to my assumption that any role these segmented worms had in the field of medicine went away with …

Read more »

From The Archives: Medical Etymology: The Origins of Our Language

January 21, 2016
From The Archives: Medical Etymology: The Origins of Our Language

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated March 28, 2012

By Robert Gianotti , MD, Todd Cutler, MD and Patrick Cocks, MD

Welcome. We are proud to present the first installment of a new section dedicated to exploring the roots of common medical terminology. We hope this will give you a chance to incorporate a historical perspective into your daily practice and to reflect on the rich and often unexpected stories lying at the heart of our profession. This is our ode to the …

Read more »

The Quest for the HIV Vaccine: Are We Closer Than We Think?

January 20, 2016
The Quest for the HIV Vaccine: Are We Closer Than We Think?

By Amar Parikh, MD 

Peer Reviewed

Amidst the global panic over the recent Ebola outbreak, another well-known pathogen that has been devastating the world for decades continues to smolder—the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). According to the World Health Organization (WHO), in 2013 there were 35 million people worldwide living with HIV, 2.1 million of who were newly infected that year . HIV/AIDS has claimed the lives of nearly 40 million people to date, with 1.5 million people dying from AIDS in 2013 alone. Although highly …

Read more »

Lies My Patients Told Me: “I Take My Medications Every Day.”

January 15, 2016
Lies My Patients Told Me: “I Take My Medications Every Day.”

By Rebecca Sussman

Peer Reviewed

Reviewing medical evidence has become such a habit that sometimes it feels almost impossible to think independently. I’ve always been a top-down thinker; I go with my gut instinct, and then look for the evidence to support my assessment.

The problem is that very often it feels like what patients need most is not the precision of a particular etiology or the selection of a medication that is perfectly and precisely tailored to their condition and comorbidities; what they need …

Read more »

Myth or Reality: Are Shellfish Allergies Related to Contrast Reactions?

January 13, 2016
Myth or Reality: Are Shellfish Allergies Related to Contrast Reactions?

By Ian Fagan, MD

Peer Reviewed

I was recently vacationing on a cruise ship. As anybody who regularly cruises most certainly knows, you make your money back not in the casino, but rather on lobster night—a meal consisting of endless portions of delicious, succulent lobster tail.

A table mate of mine did not order the lobster. When asked why, she shared an interesting tale: After 40 years of eating shellfish as she pleased, she was found to be “allergic to iodine” and was subsequently warned …

Read more »

Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

January 11, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Matthew McNeill, MD

Peer Reviewed

The holidays have ended, the trees and tinsel have been taken down, and winter has officially arrived in New York City. Unseasonably warm weather (from the second warmest year in history ]) up to this point has kept the influenza virus as a sporadically diagnosed condition in New York and much of the United States. The advent of cooler air, lower humidity, enclosed spaces, runny noses, and decreased Vitamin D are sure to change that in coming weeks ].…

Read more »

A Clinical Correlations Winter (Summer?) Break

December 24, 2015
A Clinical Correlations Winter (Summer?) Break

While reveling in the balmy weather in New York, we wanted to take this opportunity to wish everyone Happy Holidays and a wonderful New Year.  Clinical Correlations will be on a brief hiatus and will resume publishing on 1/11/16.  Stay warm…seriously.…

Read more »