Why Do Toenails Grow More Slowly Than Fingernails?

November 14, 2014
Why Do Toenails Grow More Slowly Than Fingernails?

By Alice Drain

Peer Reviewed

Warm weather heralds the arrival of flip-flops and the exposure of toes previously tucked away in socks and boots. This sudden pedal presence makes one wonder, why do toenails grow more slowly than fingernails?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First, to what degree does speed of nail growth vary? Anyone who has ever had to wait as a broken toenail gradually grows in, treated a toe fungus, or gotten a mani-pedi is familiar with…

Read more »

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Myths and Realities: The Fishy Truth about Mercury Toxicity

November 13, 2014
FROM THE ARCHIVES: Myths and Realities: The Fishy Truth about Mercury Toxicity

Please enjoy this post from the Archives dated December 17, 2011

By Nicole Learned

Faculty Peer Reviewed

In an age when patients obtain medical news from the media, and celebrities initiate powerful health trends, clinicians have to be prepared to answer even the most obscure questions about health and nutrition. When Entourage star Jeremy Piven took a leave of absence in 2008 from the Broadway play Speed the Plow due to alleged mercury poisoning from eating sushi twice a day for years, it raised the question:…

Read more »

Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

November 10, 2014
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Shannon Chiu, MD

Peer Reviewed

This past Tuesday’s midterm congressional elections proved to be a big day for the Republicans, as they took control of the Senate and a record number of governor’s seats, and expanded their majority in the House – their largest House majority since World War II era. President Obama shook off his party’s electoral drubbing, noting that he was eager to find common ground with the Republicans: “It doesn’t make me mopey. It energizes me, because it means that this…

Read more »

Myth vs. Reality: Can Deodorant Cause Breast Cancer?

November 6, 2014
Myth vs. Reality: Can Deodorant Cause Breast Cancer?

By Dana Zalkin

Peer reviewed

Recently, my own mother approached me with a personal medical question: “Is it true that I need to avoid antiperspirants given that I’m a breast cancer survivor?” From her tone, it was clear that she wanted a particular answer from me: “No, mom, that’s just a myth.” But in all honesty, I had no idea. Her surgeon had advised against antiperspirant use, but her radiologist denied any association between the product and breast cancer. So, in honor of my mother…

Read more »

Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

November 4, 2014
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Benjamin Geisler, MD MPH

Peer reviewed

With the first Ebola patient being treated in the New York City area in one of our own training institutions, the viral disease is, understandably, on all our minds. Now a week and a half ago, Bellevue’s atrium was the setting for a press conference that featured the mayor, the city’s health commissioner, and the governor. Since then, the governors of New York, New Jersey, and Maine have instituted a quarantine for returning health care workers from the…

Read more »

Primecuts: This Week In The Journals

October 20, 2014
Primecuts: This Week In The Journals

By Anish Parikh, MD

Peer Reviewed

This week, the Ebola virus outbreak continues to dominate the news both here and abroad. The number of newly-diagnosed patients in West Africa continues to rise, particularly in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, while Nigeria and Senegal have gone nearly four weeks without any new cases. International aid workers infected with Ebola continue to be transported out of affected areas back to their home countries, however as a consequence of this, new cases are now starting to arise…

Read more »

Falls in Older Adults—Risk Factors and Strategies for Prevention

October 15, 2014
Falls in Older Adults—Risk Factors and Strategies for Prevention

By Joseph Plaksin

Peer Reviewed

Falls are a major health problem for older adults. Various reviews and meta-analyses have estimated that 30% of people over age 65 and 50% of people over age 85 who live in the community will fall at least once. The prevalence of falls is even higher in long-term care facilities, occurring in more than 50% of people over age 65 . Fall-related injuries occur in 10-40% of falls and can range from minor bruises or lacerations to…

Read more »

It Was Almost Called the Cylinder (& Other Who-Knew Facts about the Stethoscope)

October 10, 2014
It Was Almost Called the Cylinder (& Other Who-Knew Facts about the Stethoscope)

By Cindy Fang, MD

Peer Reviewed

“A wonderful instrument…is now in complete vogue in Paris…It is quite a fashion, if a person complains of cough, to have recourse to the miraculous tube which however cannot effect a cure but should you unfortunately perceive in the countenance of the doctor that he fancies certain symptoms exist it is very likely that a nervous person might become seriously indisposed and convert the supposition into reality.” —The London Times, September 19, 1824.

The novel medical instrument…

Read more »