Heme/Onc

Medicine by the Numbers

October 9, 2009
Medicine by the Numbers

Chris Tully MD

Faculty peer reviewed

What is the number of patients needed to prophylax to prevent an episode of venous thromboembolism in a hospitalized medical patient?

 

 The use of prophylactic anticoagulation for venous thromboembolism (VTE) is considered standard of care in the inpatient medical setting in order to prevent deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and fatal and nonfatal pulmonary embolism (PE). While a majority of the knowledge stems of post-surgical patients, there has been an increasing volume of research emphasizing and illustrating the benefit in …

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PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

September 14, 2009
PrimeCuts: This Week in the Journals

Michael Ford MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Last spring, The New York Times published a series of articles that examined the status of “the War on Cancer,” initiated some 40 years ago by then president Richard Nixon. The halting pace of this war was made more poignant with the recent death of Senator Edward M. Kennedy, who had championed the effort from its inception. Certainly, much has been learned about cancer in the intervening decades, but while other illnesses saw dramatic improvement in outcome (since 1950, …

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CT Colonography-The Future of Colorectal Cancer Screening?

August 21, 2009
CT Colonography-The Future of Colorectal Cancer Screening?

Ely R. Felker


Faculty Peer Reviewed

The patient is a 52 year-old white male who presented to his internist for a routine examination. He has no family history of colorectal cancer. He has not previously been screened. He recently heard about CT colonography and would like to know how it compares to conventional colonoscopy. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the second most common cause of cancer death in the United States(1). Multiple studies have demonstrated that most colorectal cancers develop …

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The Asian Glow: A unique screening tool to evaluate for an elevated risk of esophageal cancer

July 29, 2009
The Asian Glow: A unique screening tool to evaluate for an elevated risk of esophageal cancer

Cindy Mui MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The alcohol flushing response is a physiologic response to ingestion of alcohol and is characterized by facial flushing, nausea, tachycardia, and hypotension, felt to be due to an inherited deficiency in the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2). It is experienced by one third of East Asians and is more commonly known as the “Asian glow” or the “Asian flush”(1). Although the alcohol flushing response is generally seen as cosmetic and even embarrassing on a night out, there is evidence …

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Myths and Realities: Do Power Lines Cause Cancer?

May 20, 2009
Myths and Realities: Do Power Lines Cause Cancer?

Aditya Mattoo MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Prompted by personal experience, I thought I would explore the alleged causative role of power lines in hematologic malignancies for the next installment of Myths and Realities. In recent years, two close family friends living at separate locations but in homes adjacent to lots with electrical transformers were diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma and Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. Naturally, the coincidence was not unnoticed, so I decided to put power lines on trial and look through the literature to see if a …

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The Skinny on Cachexia…Can it be Treated?

April 22, 2009
The Skinny on Cachexia…Can it be Treated?

Michael T. Tees, MD, MPH

On the wards and in the clinic, the physician is frequently presented with a patient with a decreased appetite and alarming weight loss. The patient is likely frustrated with their own fraility, the family is upset at the poor nutritional state of their loved one, but the healthcare provider should be the most concerned. This clinical presentation without a prior diagnosis is worrisome, and if the patient does have an underlying etiology, this likely represents progression.

Caring for the cachectic …

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Clinical Questions: How do you dose argatroban?

April 16, 2009
Clinical Questions: How do you dose argatroban?

Frederick Gandolfo, MD

Case: An 85 year-old woman admitted to the hospital with pneumonia and after a prolonged hospital course developed heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). She is currently being treated with argatroban and her platelet counts are recovering. You are the covering physician and are called by the lab for an INR of 12 on her routine labs. The patient shows no signs of bleeding and she is not on warfarin. The PTT at the time is 160 seconds. What is the appropriate course of action?…

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Prostate Cancer and Antioxidants

February 25, 2009

Commentary by Christopher Tully MD, PGY-1

Faculty Peer Reviewed

An apple a day. . . keeps the prostate cancer away? While it is an overstatement to say that an apple can prevent cancer, the notion of taking “something” to prevent cancer initiation and growth is nothing new. Primary prevention has long been a goal of researchers and physicians with the aim of preventing the morbidity and mortality associated with malignant disease. Prostate cancer is an appropriate choice in studying this topic since we already know …

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