Category: Rheumatology

Clinical Correlations


Gamechanger? The Effect of Intra-articular Triamcinolone vs Saline on Knee Cartilage Volume and Pain in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis – A Randomized Clinical Trial

By Rebecca Lazarus, MD

Peer Reviewed

Why does this matter?
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of disability in the United States and is the most common type of arthritis. The pathogenesis involves the progressive destruction of articular cartilage in a joint, which is accompanied by new bone formation and synovial proliferation.…

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NSAIDs: Are They All the Same?

By Vishal Shah, MD

Peer Reviewed

Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a heterogenous group of non-opioid analgesics and anti-inflammatory agents. Their use is ubiquitous, from treating a simple tension headache to a sprained ankle. NSAIDs are available over the counter and in prescription form.…

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Age Is Just a Number: Combating Muscle Loss in The Elderly

By Carl Preiksaitis

Peer Reviewed

The term “sarcopenia” was introduced in 1989 to characterize the loss of muscle mass that occurs as a consequence of advancing age.1 Use of the term has since grown to include the loss of muscular function experienced in older adults.[1] The prevalence of sarcopenia is estimated to be approximately 29% in community-dwelling older adults and 33% in individuals living in long-term care institutions.[2] Sarcopenia is linked to increased morbidity and mortality from physical disability, increased falls and fractures, decreased quality of life, and higher incidence of depression and hospitalizations.[2] This condition contributes to a significant financial burden on the US healthcare system, with estimated costs in the year 2000 exceeding $18.5 billion.[3] Furthermore, the decline in physical fitness seen in sarcopenic patients has been associated with increased all-cause mortality.[4]

Given that current census estimates project a more-than doubling of the US population over the age of 65 by 2060, physicians will need to become adept at diagnosing and treating sarcopenia.[5] What strategies are currently available for the diagnosis and treatment of this condition in the primary care setting?…

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Gout: A Disease of the Blessed or a Blessing in Disguise?

By Krithiga Sekar

Faculty Peer Reviewed

“The patient goes to bed and sleeps quietly until about two in the morning when he is awakened by a pain which usually seizes the great toe, but sometimes the heel, the calf of the leg or the ankle… so exquisitely painful as not to endure the weight of the clothes nor the shaking of the room from a person walking briskly therein.”

—Thomas Sydenham  (1683)[1,2]

Gout, an excruciatingly painful but relatively benign form of arthritis in the modern world, has an intriguing pathology with ancient roots.…

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FROM THE ARCHIVES: How Do You Diagnose Polymyalgia Rheumatica?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated August 12, 2009

By Eve Wadsworth MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is a condition that resembles several different disorders including osteoarthritis and can be difficult to diagnose. In addition to osteoarthritis, PMR can resemble conditions as diverse as depression, fibromyalgia, myopathic drug reactions, and malignancy.…

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ANCA and Small-Vessel Vasculitis

By Eugene Friedman, Class of 2012

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The discovery of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) was a serendipitous finding. In 1982, Davies and colleagues published a report detailing their discovery of antibodies that specifically localized to the cytoplasm of neutrophils in patients with necrotizing glomerulonephritis and small-vessel vasculitis–antibodies that disappeared after immunosuppressive therapy and reappeared with disease recurrence.

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