Category: Psychiatry

Clinical Correlations


Gratitude: Benefits for the Soul, and the Body

Thank-you-word-cloudBy Nicole Van Groningen, MD

Peer Reviewed

Although the “stress of the holidays” is a phrase used to refer to the multitude of to-do lists and travel obligations associated with the 6-week stretch between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day, the pleasant emotional state associated with the season remains one of the most important positive influences on the American psyche.…

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Breaking the Cycle: Shining a Light on Physician Depression and Suicide for the Next Generation

No_Escape_By Andrew Hallett

Peer Reviewed 

For decades, surveys and public data have shown staggeringly high rates of suicide, suicidal ideation, and depression among physicians when compared to the general population.1-4 Male doctors are 40% more likely to commit suicide than other men, and female doctors are 130% more likely to do so than other women, according to a 2004 analysis in the American Journal of Psychiatry.…

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Morgellons: Real Disease or Delusion Turned Internet Meme?

By Robert Mazgaj

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Morgellons disease is an “unexplained dermopathy” characterized by fibers emerging from skin lesions, and associated with various cutaneous sensations.[1] Inspired by a curious medical condition reported by a 17th century English physician, Morgellons was actually named in 2002 by Mary Leitao, a layperson, to describe the mysterious set of symptoms reportedly suffered by her then 2-year-old son.[2,3] Leitao then launched the not-for-profit Morgellons Research Foundation (MRF) along with a (no longer active) website, www.morgellons.org.[3] MRF successfully petitioned members of Congress as well as the public to convince the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to perform an epidemiologic study of Morgellons disease.…

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Mental Health Considerations for Gay and Lesbian Patients

By Benjamin Cox

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Gay men and lesbian women are members of a stigmatized minority group and evidence suggests that they may disproportionately utilize mental health services.[1] This increased use of mental health services may be related to the concept of minority stress: that stigma, prejudice, discrimination, and violence create a hostile and stressful social environment that can contribute to mental health problems.[2] Examples of external stressors that pose threats to mental health in gay and lesbian patients include verbal and physical violence, housing and job discrimination, lack of legal rights to protection in medical emergencies, and institutionalized discriminatory policies such as rejection of blood donations from gay men, anti-gay ballot initiatives, and lack of legal acknowledgment of same-sex couples’ relationships. …

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Motivational Interviewing: Can You Really Change Behaviors?

Emily Stamell

Faculty peer reviewed

As a well-trained fourth year medical student, I inquire about smoking habits as part of almost all my patient encounters. Yet, I do not recall properly counseling a patient on smoking cessation aside from the one liner “You know you should quit, right?” During first and second year of medical school we are taught the stages of change model, which is just as obscure two years later as cell signaling pathways.…

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Addiction 2.0 Part 2

alcohol.jpgCommentary by Joshua Lee MD, Ellie Grossman MD and Marc Gourevitch MD, NYU Division of General Internal Medicine

Please also see Part 1 of this series, posted last week

Alcohol treatment in primary care: evidence for effectiveness and neharmacotherapies

Brief interventions by primary care physicians to address unhealthy alcohol use have been shown in multiple studies and settings to promote reduced drinking and engagement in other treatment, although long-term impact on alcohol-related morbidity and mortality is not clear.(Saitz 2005) Standard brief intervention techniques are based on the 4 A’s: Ask (about drinking using validated screens); Advise (regarding a diagnosis of hazardous drinking, alcohol abuse, or alcohol dependence); Assist (with the patient’s motivation for change), and Arrange (follow-up with the physician or refer to a treatment program).…

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