From the Archives

From The Archives: Does Heyde Syndrome Exist?

August 8, 2013
From The Archives: Does Heyde Syndrome Exist?

Please enjoy this post from the Archives dated September 29, 2010

By Lara Dunn, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

In 1958, EC Heyde published 10 cases of aortic stenosis (AS) and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) of the gastrointestinal tract in the New England Journal of Medicine . Thus, the association between aortic stenosis and intestinal angiodysplasia became known as Heyde Syndrome. Yet the existence of this syndrome has been controversial.

Contrasting conclusions have been obtained by studies conducted to evaluate this association. In a prospective study, Bhutani…

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From The Archives: Why Does Multiple Myeloma Treat The Kidneys So Poorly?

July 11, 2013
From The Archives: Why Does Multiple Myeloma Treat The Kidneys So Poorly?

Please enjoy this post from the Archives dated September 22, 2010

By Jon Emile Kenny, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

“You mean I’ve got cancer and my kidneys are failing, doc?” said my frail patient on the Bellevue oncology service shortly after a medical student had told him that his kidneys were damaged. Indeed, his new diagnosis of multiple myeloma was accompanied by an admission creatinine of 2.5 mg/dL.

About a quarter of patients with multiple myeloma have renal insufficiency at diagnosis . There are…

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From The Archives – Myths and Realities: Heart and Wine

September 27, 2012
From The Archives – Myths and Realities: Heart and Wine

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated August 26, 2010

By Aditya Mattoo, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Not too long ago, a patient came to my clinic and said (I’m paraphrasing of course), “I never cared for alcohol, doctor, so I haven’t had much to drink since my college days. Maybe champagne or wine on the rare special occasion, but I keep hearing about how wine is good for your heart, so I am thinking I should start drinking regularly.” For years I have…

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From The Archives: The Role of Serologic Testing in the Diagnosis of Celiac Disease

August 23, 2012
From The Archives: The Role of Serologic Testing in the Diagnosis of Celiac Disease

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated, August 18, 2010

By Todd Cutler

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A 31-year-old woman presents to the clinic with chronic fatigue. She was diagnosed with iron  deficiency anemia when she was 25 years old and has since taken oral contraceptives to limit bleeding during menstruation which she describes as minimal. She has a family history significant for an older brother with celiac disease. She is thin and her exam is significant for conjunctival pallor. Her laboratory findings are

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From The Archives – Ask a Librarian: What are the Key Resources for Clinical Decision Making?

August 9, 2012
From The Archives – Ask a Librarian: What are the Key Resources for Clinical Decision Making?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated July 14, 2010

By Aileen McCrillis, MSLIS

Faculty Peer Reviewed

In order to ensure the best-quality healthcare for patients, it is important for clinicians to consult the highest level of evidence to guide them in the decision-making process. As the volume of biomedical literature increases over time, it becomes more and more difficult for the clinician to identify the best evidence.

Many different types of clinical decision-making resources are now available to clinicians through the Internet.…

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From The Archives – Evolution and Medicine: Why do we age?

July 19, 2012
From The Archives – Evolution and Medicine: Why do we age?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated January 30, 2010.

Mark D. Schwartz and Julia Hyland Bruno

Jeanne Calment rode her bicycle until age 100, quit smoking at 117, and died in 1977 at 122 years of age in Arles, France. This news-worthy story raises some questions: Why do we age at all? Why don’t we live forever? And many of us are asked by our patients, is old age a disease we can cure?

First, some useful distinctions: Aging is getting chronologically older,…

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From The Archives: The Ethics of Electronic Health Records

June 21, 2012
From The Archives: The Ethics of Electronic Health Records

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated January 15, 2010

John J. Mercuri

Faculty peer reviewed

Introduction
The 111th Congress allocated $19 billion of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 toward the creation of an electronic health record (EHR) for each person in the United States by 2014.(1) The recent debate over EHRs has focused largely on the economic, logistical, and political consequences of implementing such a system; however, the country should also contemplate the ethical ramifications of EHRs. Addressing these concerns…

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From The Archives: How Does Alcohol Cause Cardiomyopathy?

April 19, 2012
From The Archives: How Does Alcohol Cause Cardiomyopathy?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated November 4, 2009

Charles Levine

Faculty peer reviewed

Excessive consumption of ethanol (EtOH) has many deleterious effects on the human body. The heart is a target of damage from EtOH consumption, as chronic consumption of EtOH leads to decreased cardiac function and structural heart disease, including dilated cardiomyopathy.(1) The exact mechanism by which EtOH exerts its deleterious effects on the heart remains poorly understood and is an area of active…

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From The Archives: How to interpret troponins in renal disease?

March 15, 2012
From The Archives: How to interpret troponins in renal disease?

Please enjoy this post from the archives first posted on October 21, 2009.

By Ivan Saraiva MD

Case: A 68-year-old man, with a history of stable angina and end-stage renal disease treated by hemodialysis for the past three years, presents to the hospital with leg swelling and shortness of breath. He also complains of intermittent chest pain unrelated to exertion. Physical exam reveals bilateral pitting lower extremity edema, pulmonary crackles, and an elevated jugular venous pressure. Initial electrocardiogram is notable for some nonspecific repolarization abnormalities.…

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From The Archives: Myths and Realities: Colon Cleansing: Healthful or just a load of @$%!

January 26, 2012
From The Archives: Myths and Realities: Colon Cleansing: Healthful or just a load of @$%!

Please enjoy this post from the archives on July 16, 2009

By Chau Che MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

You’ll have increased energy, radiant skin, reduced joint pain, improved asthma symptoms, and best of all…you will lose weight. These are some of the purported benefits of removing “toxins” (otherwise known as undigested material) from the colon through cleansing. As with fashion, music, and art, what’s old has a way of becoming trendy again…especially when celebrities such as Beyonce talk about it on the Oprah Winfrey show.…

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From The Archives: Why is Syphilis Still Sensitive to Penicillin?

January 13, 2012
From The Archives: Why is Syphilis Still Sensitive to Penicillin?

Please enjoy this post from the Archives, first published on July 30, 2009

By Sam Rougas MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

It seems that every week a new article in a major newspaper is reporting what most infectious disease physicians have been preaching for several years. Antibiotic resistance is rapidly spreading. Infections such as Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcal Aureus, Extremely Drug Resistant Tuberculosis, and Vancomycin Resistant Enterococcus have journeyed from the intensive care units to the locker rooms of the National Football League. That being said, some…

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Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Premature Coronary Artery Disease

July 14, 2011
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Premature Coronary Artery Disease

Please enjoy this post from the Clinical Correlations archives first posted June 17, 2009

Ishmeal  Bradley MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Ms. W is a 35 yo woman with a history of systemic lupus erythematosus diagnosed 10 years ago. Her only medications are hydroxychloroquine and prednisone for occasional disease flares. She is otherwise healthy. She has no known personal or family history of cardiac disease or stroke, but does smoke ½ pack of cigarettes per day. Currently, she denies any chest pain, shortness of breath, urinary…

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