From the Archives

From the Archives: Decoding the APOL1 Kidney

May 4, 2017
From the Archives: Decoding the APOL1 Kidney

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated September 25, 2013

By Areeba Sadiq

Faculty Peer Reviewed

African American patients have a higher risk of developing end-stage renal disease (ESRD) than their Caucasian counterparts . If over the age of 70, that risk is 3 times higher. If between the ages of 60-69, the risk is 8 times higher. And, if between 30 and 39, African American patients are an astounding 11 times more likely to develop ESRD . Why are African Americans more likely …

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From the Archives: Did Abraham Lincoln Have Marfan Syndrome?

April 13, 2017
From the Archives: Did Abraham Lincoln Have Marfan Syndrome?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated April 19, 2013

By Anna Krigel Faculty Peer Reviewed The iconic image of Abraham Lincoln is ubiquitous in our lives, from his small face on the penny to his large figure looming over the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Lincoln fascinates historians because of his significant role in American history when our nation was bitterly divided, but he intrigues physicians because of his remarkable stature. A reporter once described the 16th president as a “tall, lank, lean…

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From The Archives – In Search of a Competitive Advantage: A Primer for the Clinician Treating the Anabolic Steroid User

January 26, 2017
From The Archives – In Search of a Competitive Advantage: A Primer for the Clinician Treating the Anabolic Steroid User

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated, April 17, 2013

By David G. Rosenthal and Robert Gianotti, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Case: A 33-year-old man comes to your clinic complaining of worsening acne over the last 6 months. You note a significant increase in both BMI and bicep circumference. After several minutes of denial, he reveals that he has been using both injectable and oral anabolic steroids. He receives these drugs from a local supplier and via the Internet. He confides that his libido …

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From The Archives: In Search of a Competitive Advantage: A Primer for the Clinician Treating the Anabolic Steroid User

November 10, 2016
From The Archives: In Search of a Competitive Advantage: A Primer for the Clinician Treating the Anabolic Steroid User

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated April 17, 2013

By David G. Rosenthal and Robert Gianotti, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Case: A 33-year-old man comes to your clinic complaining of worsening acne over the last 6 months. You note a significant increase in both BMI and bicep circumference. After several minutes of denial, he reveals that he has been using both injectable and oral anabolic steroids. He receives these drugs from a local supplier and via the Internet. He confides that his libido …

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From The Archives: The Effect of Bariatric Surgery on Incretin Hormones and Glucose Homeostasis

October 13, 2016
From The Archives: The Effect of Bariatric Surgery on Incretin Hormones and Glucose Homeostasis

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated April 4, 2013

By Michael Crist

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Until recently, little thought was given to the important role played by the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum in glucose homeostasis. The involvement of the gut in glucose regulation is mediated by the enteroinsular axis, which refers to the neural and hormonal signaling pathways that connect the gastrointestinal (GI) tract with pancreatic beta cells. These pathways are largely responsible for the increase in insulin that occurs during the postprandial …

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From The Archives: Have a Cow? How Recent Studies on Red Meat Consumption Apply to Clinical Practice

October 6, 2016
From The Archives: Have a Cow? How Recent Studies on Red Meat Consumption Apply to Clinical Practice

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated, April 12, 2013

By Tyler R. McClintock

Faculty Peer Reviewed

“Red Meat Kills.” “Red Meat a Ticket to Early Grave.” “A Hot Dog a Day Raises Risk of Dying.” Such were the headlines circulating in popular press last year when the Annals of Internal Medicine released details of an upcoming article out of Frank Hu’s research group at the Harvard School of Public Health . Analyzing long-term prospective data from two large cohort studies, researchers found that …

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From The Archives – White Coat Hypertension: Are Doctors Bad for Your Blood Pressure?

September 29, 2016
From The Archives – White Coat Hypertension: Are Doctors Bad for Your Blood Pressure?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated March 20, 2013

By Lauren Foster

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Hypertension is a pervasive chronic disease affecting approximately 65 million adults in the United States, and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality . Antihypertensives are widely prescribed due to their effectiveness in lowering blood pressure, thereby reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. However, the phenomenon of the “white coat effect” may be a complicating factor in the diagnosis and management of hypertensive patients. It is well established …

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From The Archives: Reflections on Hurricane Sandy

September 22, 2016
From The Archives: Reflections on Hurricane Sandy

Please enjoy this post from the archives, dated, January 11, 2013

By Jessica Taff, MD

As the 3 major teaching hospitals that make up NYU Medical Center begin to come back online, we thought it was the right time to share some of our reflections on Hurricane Sandy.  It’s been a long strange journey for the faculty, housestaff, students and most of all our patients.  It’s time now though for us to come back home; to return with a renewed sense of purpose and a …

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