Systems

FDA Black Box Warning on Gadolinium

May 24, 2007

Back in December we reported on the FDA cautioning practioners about the use of gadolinium (an mri contrast agent) in patients with chronic kidney disease.  The FDA is now requesting a black box warning  stating “that patients with severe kidney insufficiency who receive gadolinium-based agents are at risk for developing a debilitating, and a potentially fatal disease known as nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). In addition, it would state that patients just before or just after liver transplantation, or those with chronic liver disease, are also at risk…

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Not So Rosi…

May 24, 2007
Not So Rosi…

Commentary by Seagram Villagomez MD, Chief Resident

Since its approval in 1999, nearly 1 million Americans have used the thiazolidinedione (TZD) rosiglitazone (Avandia – GlaxoSmithKline) for the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes.  However, in a drug class which seems plagued by concerns, the safety profile associated with rosiglitazone has been brought to question. Previously, troglitazone (Rezulin) was pulled off the market secondary to hepatoxicity, while muraglitazar was not approved by the FDA given adverse cardiovascular events during early clinical trials.  In a…

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Mystery Quiz #3-The Answer

May 15, 2007
Mystery Quiz #3-The Answer

Before you read the answer you should read the orginal post form last week

The Final Poll Results (26 votes): metastatic disease (26%) , mycobacterial disease (22%) ,fungal disease (22%), bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia (boop) (13%), septic emboli (9%) ,vasculitis, e.g. wegener’s (4%), thromboembolic disease (4%), sarcoid (0%)

The patient had granulomatous inflammation on pathology with acid-fast organisms seen. The culture grew mycobacterium avium (MAC). After treatment with azithromycin, ethambutol and rifabutin for eighteen months, the follow-up imaging showed significant clearing…

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The HPV vaccine: Recommended in the U.S., but required in Virginia

May 8, 2007
The HPV vaccine: Recommended in the U.S., but required in Virginia

Commentary By: Marshall Fordyce, PGY-3

Now that the dust has settled in Texas and Virginia, let’s clarify the role of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine in our clinics. An excellent article in last week’s JAMA by its Editor-In-Chief, Dr. Catherine DeAngelis, and Lawrence Gostin, JD, highlights how the recent push for compulsory vaccination – a significant step beyond CDC recommendations – defied precedent and threatened public confidence in our national vaccine policy. Now, after the tussle of aggressive pharmaceutical lobbying and the public outcry…

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Mystery Quiz

May 3, 2007
Mystery Quiz

Posted By Robert Smith, MD Associate Professor of Medicine, Division Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

The patient is an 81 year old male with severe obstructive lung disease who was referred to the pulmonary service for an abnormal chest x-ray prior to femoral-popliteal bypass surgery.   The patient complained of chronic dyspnea on exertion but specifically denied hemoptysis, increased cough, fever or night sweats.   Initial cxr revealed the following:

A chest ct showed only a spiculated appearing mass in the left upper lobe…

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Is the PPD obsolete?

May 1, 2007
Is the PPD obsolete?

In February of this year the New York City Department of Health released a new policy paper indicating that they will no longer use the PPD as a screening tool for tuberculosis in their clinics.They have switched to the QuantiFERON-TB Gold, (QFT-G), a blood test. This test is an ELISA, which measures interferon-gamma secretion by t-lymphocytes in response to tuberculosis specific antigens. The test requires heparinized whole blood and must be processed within 12 hours of the blood draw.

The test exposes the patients t-lymphocytes…

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Statin Pleiotropy: Unique Roles for a Common Medication

April 26, 2007
Statin Pleiotropy: Unique Roles for a Common Medication

By: Melissa Freeman, MD, PGY1

For over a decade now, statins, or 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, have facilitated millions of patients in the management of their atherosclerosis. Statins are known for their ability to reduce hepatic lipoproteins, up-regulate hepatic LDL receptors, and increase apoprotein E- and B-containing lipoproteins. They have become a household name in the genre of lipid-lowering and a touted hero in cardiovascular risk reduction amongst physicians. Excitingly, research has found that statins may be valuable in disease…

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How Do You Estimate Stroke Risk After a Transient Ischemic Attack?

April 24, 2007
How Do You Estimate Stroke Risk After a Transient Ischemic Attack?

By: Alana Choy-Shan, MD PGY-3
Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) are known to be a harbinger of stroke, however it is difficult for physicians to estimate individual stroke risk. Previously, the two systems used to predict short-term risk of stroke after a TIA were the California and ABCD scores. Both scores are based on clinical factors with several key elements in common. However, neither scoring system was devised to predict stroke within 48 hours of TIA, a time period which may be most clinically relevant.…

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Quick Thinking Part 4-The Conclusion

April 20, 2007
Quick Thinking Part 4-The Conclusion

Welcome to Quick Thinking. A case is presented in short sections to a faculty expert who will comment on their approach to the patient as the case unfolds. These posts will focus on determining the initial differential diagnoses and diagnostic workups of complicated patient presentations.

Part 1 can be found here.  Part 2 can be found here.  Part 3 can be found here.

Part 3 Case Presentation by Elizabeth Ross, PGY-3:

The patient continued to complain of headache and dizziness and given the patient’s persistent and intermittent fevers…

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New Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism-Part 2

April 19, 2007
New Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism-Part 2

Commentary By: Margaret Horlick, MD, PGY-3

New guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) were recently jointly issued by the American Academy of Family Physicians and the American College of Physicians. The guidelines are based on a systematic review of the evidence and are published, along with the systematic reviews, in the 2/2007 and 3/2007 issues of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Part 1-Diagnosis

Part 2 Treatment

The treatment recommendations are summarized as follows:

Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), as opposed to unfractionated

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Don’t Pass the Olives…

April 18, 2007
Don’t Pass the Olives…

This week, olives from several different companies were found to contain Clostridium Botulinum. No cases of botulism have been reported to date, but this is an opportunity to review the pertinent clinical findings.

Botulism is caused by exposure to the botulinum neurotoxin in clostridium botulinum. There are eight toxin strains identified, 4 are known to cause disease in humans. The toxin is produced only in an anaerobic environment, so bottled or canned food products are a good source of infection. Food may smell…

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New Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism-Part 1

April 12, 2007
New Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism-Part 1

Commentary By: Margaret Horlick, MD, PGY-3

New guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) were recently jointly issued by the American Academy of Family Physicians and the American College of Physicians. The guidelines are based on a systematic review of the evidence and are published, along with the systematic reviews, in the 2/2007 and 3/2007 issues of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

According to the reviews, there are 600,000 cases of VTE in the US annually, and the…

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