Journal Club

Breaking News: The Jupiter Trial

November 12, 2008
Breaking News: The Jupiter Trial

Commentary by Ilana Bragin MD, PGY-3

This week online in the NEJM, the results of a trial known as Jupiter were presented in an article that will likely change the way we approach cardiovascular health protection. The Jupiter trial attempts to answer this perturbing question: “Why do half of all myocardial infarctions and strokes occur in apparently healthy men and women with levels of LDL that are below currently recommended thresholds of treatment?” The study addresses the biomarker C-reactive protein, an inflammatory marker that has …

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Perioperative Beta-blockade: Will POISE Change Management?

September 10, 2008
Perioperative Beta-blockade: Will POISE Change Management?

Commentary by Michael LoCurcio MD, Michael Janjigian MD and Michael C Brabeck MD, FACP, NYU Division of General Internal Medicine

Cardiovascular complications continue to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the perioperative period. Although progress has been made in terms of risk stratification, an effective invasive or pharmacologic intervention that decreases this risk remains elusive. Well designed studies have shown that prophylactic invasive measures are not effective in decreasing this risk, leaving clinicians uncertain as to the best way to maximize the …

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Not So Rosi…

May 24, 2007
Not So Rosi…

Commentary by Seagram Villagomez MD, Chief Resident

Since its approval in 1999, nearly 1 million Americans have used the thiazolidinedione (TZD) rosiglitazone (Avandia – GlaxoSmithKline) for the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes.  However, in a drug class which seems plagued by concerns, the safety profile associated with rosiglitazone has been brought to question. Previously, troglitazone (Rezulin) was pulled off the market secondary to hepatoxicity, while muraglitazar was not approved by the FDA given adverse cardiovascular events during early clinical trials.  In a study just released …

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How Do You Estimate Stroke Risk After a Transient Ischemic Attack?

April 24, 2007
How Do You Estimate Stroke Risk After a Transient Ischemic Attack?

By: Alana Choy-Shan, MD PGY-3
Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) are known to be a harbinger of stroke, however it is difficult for physicians to estimate individual stroke risk. Previously, the two systems used to predict short-term risk of stroke after a TIA were the California and ABCD scores. Both scores are based on clinical factors with several key elements in common. However, neither scoring system was devised to predict stroke within 48 hours of TIA, a time period which may be most clinically relevant.

In …

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New Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism-Part 2

April 19, 2007
New Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism-Part 2

Commentary By: Margaret Horlick, MD, PGY-3

New guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) were recently jointly issued by the American Academy of Family Physicians and the American College of Physicians. The guidelines are based on a systematic review of the evidence and are published, along with the systematic reviews, in the 2/2007 and 3/2007 issues of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Part 1-Diagnosis

Part 2 Treatment

The treatment recommendations are summarized as follows:

Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), as opposed to unfractionated heparin,…

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New Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism-Part 1

April 12, 2007
New Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism-Part 1

Commentary By: Margaret Horlick, MD, PGY-3

New guidelines on the diagnosis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) were recently jointly issued by the American Academy of Family Physicians and the American College of Physicians. The guidelines are based on a systematic review of the evidence and are published, along with the systematic reviews, in the 2/2007 and 3/2007 issues of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

According to the reviews, there are 600,000 cases of VTE in the US annually, and the importance of early diagnosis …

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Does Screening for Lung Cancer Improve Mortality?

April 10, 2007
Does Screening for Lung Cancer Improve Mortality?

Commentary By: Anna Dvorak, MDPGY-3

Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer mortality in both men and women. Screening patients at risk for lung cancer might reduce mortality if it helps find cancers at an early stage while they are still resectable. Randomized studies done in the 1970s showed that screening for lung cancer with chest x-ray did not support this theory. Chest x-rays identified more small tumors, but resecting them did not improve mortality. The question of whether screening with chest CT …

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The COURAGE Trial: PCI is not superior to medical therapy in patients with stable coronary disease

March 27, 2007
The COURAGE Trial:  PCI is not superior to medical therapy in patients with stable coronary disease

Commentary by Cara Litvin, PGY-3

The results of one of the more remarkable studies from the meeting of the American College of Cardiology were presented on Monday, along with the simultaneous early publishing of the study online in the New England Journal of Medicine. As a result the study results captured a front page article in today’s New York Times.

The COURAGE (Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive Drug Evaluation) trial was a randomized trial involving 2287 patients with stable but significant coronary artery disease …

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