GI

Promising New Hepatitis C Medications Raise Hopes, Questions

January 17, 2013
Promising New Hepatitis C Medications Raise Hopes, Questions

By Carl M. Gay, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A healthy 61-year old man with a history of chronic genotype 1b hepatitis C virus infection of unknown duration arrives for his semiannual appointment in the Hepatology Clinic. The patient has previously been offered treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin, which he has declined on the basis of potential side effects and poor reported efficacy. He states that he has read that new treatment options for hepatitis C have recently become available…

Hepatitis C virus (HCV), first …

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From The Archives: The Role of Serologic Testing in the Diagnosis of Celiac Disease

August 23, 2012
From The Archives: The Role of Serologic Testing in the Diagnosis of Celiac Disease

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated, August 18, 2010

By Todd Cutler

Faculty Peer Reviewed

A 31-year-old woman presents to the clinic with chronic fatigue. She was diagnosed with iron  deficiency anemia when she was 25 years old and has since taken oral contraceptives to limit bleeding during menstruation which she describes as minimal. She has a family history significant for an older brother with celiac disease. She is thin and her exam is significant for conjunctival pallor. Her laboratory findings are significant

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Does Stress Cause Stress Ulcers? The Etiology and Pathophysiology of Stress Ulcers

August 22, 2012
Does Stress Cause Stress Ulcers? The Etiology and Pathophysiology of Stress Ulcers

Sara-Megumi Naylor, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

When Warren and Marshall were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2005 for their work on Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease , a long-standing controversy concerning the major cause of peptic ulcers was settled. They are not due to the reasons—spicy food, excessive coffee consumption, poor sleep, a stressful lifestyle—that we have heard from relatives and perhaps believed over the years. It is now well accepted that the leading causes of peptic ulcers are infection …

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Should I Consider Antibiotics in My Patient with Irritable Bowel Syndrome?

July 26, 2012
Should I Consider Antibiotics in My Patient with Irritable Bowel Syndrome?

By Jason Chalifoux

Faculty Peer Review

The story of a patient with multiple office visits due to uncontrolled abdominal pain, bloating and diarrhea/constipation is common among primary care doctors and gastroenterologists. The workup is often extensive and rules out many etiologies. After discovering no metabolic, inflammatory, or anatomic pathology, physicians use the Rome III criteria to diagnose irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is a functional bowel disorder that is diagnosed by symptoms of recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort for at least 3 days per month …

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From The Archives: Myths and Realities: Colon Cleansing: Healthful or just a load of @$%!

January 26, 2012
From The Archives: Myths and Realities: Colon Cleansing: Healthful or just a load of @$%!

Please enjoy this post from the archives on July 16, 2009

By Chau Che MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

You’ll have increased energy, radiant skin, reduced joint pain, improved asthma symptoms, and best of all…you will lose weight. These are some of the purported benefits of removing “toxins” (otherwise known as undigested material) from the colon through cleansing. As with fashion, music, and art, what’s old has a way of becoming trendy again…especially when celebrities such as Beyonce talk about it on the Oprah Winfrey show. …

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Is There Really Any Role For Steroids In Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis?

December 8, 2011
Is There Really Any Role For Steroids In Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis?

By Keri Herzog, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

The patient is a 48-year-old male with a history of heavy alcohol use (he drinks about 1 pint of vodka daily) who presented to the hospital when he noticed that he had become increasingly jaundiced. The patient was hemodynamically stable on admission and afebrile, with jaundice and scleral icterus on exam. Laboratory data was significant for a total bilirubin of 6.6, an INR of 2.3, AST of 83, ALT 72, and a Maddrey’s discriminant function (MDF) that was …

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A New Era of Therapy for Hepatitis C

November 4, 2011
A New Era of Therapy for Hepatitis C

By Alexander Jow, MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major public health issue, representing the leading cause of chronic liver disease, death from liver disease, and a principal indication for liver transplantation in the US. It is estimated that 3-4 million people in the world are infected with HCV each year. Globally, 130-170 million people are chronically infected with HCV and more than 350,000 people die from HCV-related liver disease each year. Although the natural history of HCV infection …

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The Treatment For Clostridium Difficile? Transplant!

July 29, 2011
The Treatment For Clostridium Difficile? Transplant!

By Andrea Mignatti , MD

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Among all the new medical therapies, this one will probably not be the most elegant or refined that you will read about. But it just may be one of the most unconventional ones you will come across.

From our experiences working on busy hospital wards, we know that Clostridium difficile colitis is an extremely serious infection that is becoming more prevalent due to the development of new hyper-virulent strains (toxinotype III BI/NAP1/027). It has been …

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