Wedge

October 7, 2016
Wedge

By Kyra Edson

Peer Reviewed

Wedges are triangular tools that have traditionally been used to split wood along the grain. The mechanical advantage of a wedge is its ability to accomplish this split with less force and less waste of material. Its tapered end is snugly secured inside a small defect, and then a force is applied in order to separate a piece of wood neatly and precisely.

As a medical student at the Manhattan Veterans Affairs hospital, I witnessed this powerful tool wreak havoc …

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From The Archives: Have a Cow? How Recent Studies on Red Meat Consumption Apply to Clinical Practice

October 6, 2016
From The Archives: Have a Cow? How Recent Studies on Red Meat Consumption Apply to Clinical Practice

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated, April 12, 2013

By Tyler R. McClintock

Faculty Peer Reviewed

“Red Meat Kills.” “Red Meat a Ticket to Early Grave.” “A Hot Dog a Day Raises Risk of Dying.” Such were the headlines circulating in popular press last year when the Annals of Internal Medicine released details of an upcoming article out of Frank Hu’s research group at the Harvard School of Public Health . Analyzing long-term prospective data from two large cohort studies, researchers found that …

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PCSK9 Inhibitors: Who Could Need More than a Statin?

October 5, 2016
PCSK9 Inhibitors: Who Could Need More than a Statin?

By Rhodes Hambrick

Peer Reviewed

The atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk associated with hyperlipidemia (HLD), readily apparent from the Framingham Heart Study1 of the mid-20th century, has been the target of innumerable attempted pharmacologic interventions ever since. One class of agents, the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins, became – and have remained2 – the gold standard for managing HLD-associated ASCVD risk in the setting of the remarkably favorable findings of multiple studies in the 1990s.3-5 While other agents, including niacin, fish oil, and fibrates, have …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

October 4, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Ian Henderson, MD

Peer Reviewed

This past week Donald Trump and Hilary Clinton took part in the first presidential debate of the 2016 elections. Held at Hofstra University in Long Island, NY, the debate was met with much anticipation and many questions. In between the sniffles, shimmies, microphone malfunctions, fact checking, and high volume interruptions the candidates discussed several pressing issues including the country’s economic future, race relations, and national security. While at first many were hesitant to declare a winner, a Washington Post-ABC …

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A Brief History of Early Medical Photography

September 30, 2016
A Brief History of Early Medical Photography

By Emily Milam, MD

Peer reviewed

The history of medical photography is rich and tracks the evolution of both technology and medicine. Photography’s application to medicine has become increasingly multifaceted with the advent of digital photography, smartphones, telemedicine, and the ease of photo sharing and storage. Its use has been of huge benefit since the more rudimentary days of oral communication, written description, moulage, and hand-drawn illustrations. Photography was among the first wave of medical documentation in which the subject’s condition could be more objectively …

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From The Archives – White Coat Hypertension: Are Doctors Bad for Your Blood Pressure?

September 29, 2016
From The Archives – White Coat Hypertension: Are Doctors Bad for Your Blood Pressure?

Please enjoy this post from the archives dated March 20, 2013

By Lauren Foster

Faculty Peer Reviewed

Hypertension is a pervasive chronic disease affecting approximately 65 million adults in the United States, and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality . Antihypertensives are widely prescribed due to their effectiveness in lowering blood pressure, thereby reducing the risk of cardiovascular events. However, the phenomenon of the “white coat effect” may be a complicating factor in the diagnosis and management of hypertensive patients. It is well established …

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Oxygen-Induced Hypercapnia in COPD: What is the Mechanism?

September 28, 2016
Oxygen-Induced Hypercapnia in COPD: What is the Mechanism?

By Jonathan Glatt

Peer Reviewed 

It was my first week on the wards as a third-year medical student, and I found myself huddled with the team in a busy corner of the Bellevue ED, listening to a man cough and wheeze his way through an interview. He was an elderly patient with an extensive smoking history–a lifetime of a destructive habit that had dilated and distorted his lungs beyond repair. He told us, between bouts of breathlessness, of worsening dyspnea and copious sputum production over …

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Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

September 26, 2016
Primecuts – This Week In The Journals

By Chio Yokose, M.D.

Peer Reviewed

This week, Keith L. Scott was shot to death by police in Charlotte, North Carolina while his wife recorded the scene. The footage was broadcast widely and re-ignited the intense discussion about race relations and law enforcement in America. While the police allege that he had a weapon and posed an imminent threat, his family members report that he was holding a book, not a gun, as he prepared to pick up a child from school. Along with many …

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