Systems

How do you assess a patient’s risk for recurrent DVT?

July 6, 2007
How do you assess a patient’s risk for recurrent DVT?

Commentary by Sean Cavanaugh MD, Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations

A 51-year-old man with a history of DVT diagnosed seven months ago presents to your clinic for follow up. He has no family history of blood clots. He has been on coumadin since his DVT was diagnosed. No testing for thrombophilia has been done. How do you proceed?

Recently, The Annals of Internal Medicine released an excellent statement about the treatment of venous thrombosis (see prior post). Unfortunately, it does not address the more interesting questions…

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Meeting Perspectives: The ADA Scientific Sessions: Advances in the Pharmacologic Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

July 5, 2007
Meeting Perspectives: The ADA Scientific Sessions:  Advances in the Pharmacologic Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus


Commentary by Mitchell Charap MD, Senior Associate Program Director, NYU Internal Medicine Residency Program

Caveat: What follows below reflects my perspective on new and old pharmacologic approaches to Type 2 Diabetes. It is not intended to be a comprehensive review of this topic.

TZDs

The ADA did not mount a serious attack on the Nissen NEJM metanalysis of Rosiglitazone. They suggested that patients speak to their physicians regarding the drug. I missed the Nissen/ADA debate that occurred, but gather…

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Should All Patients with Hepatitis C Be Screened for Hepatocelluar Carcinoma?

July 3, 2007
Should All Patients with Hepatitis C Be Screened for Hepatocelluar Carcinoma?

Should patients with Hepatitis C (HCV) with no evidence of cirrhosis undergo screening for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)? Is there any reason to check for HCC when the liver associated enzymes (LAEs) are normal?

-Sandeep Mangalmurti, PGY-2

Commentary by Mike Poles MD, Associate Editor Clinical Correlations and Assistant Professor, Division of Gastroenterology

HCC continues to be one of the most common solid malignancies worldwide. Further, almost all cases of HCC occur in the background of a histologically-abnormal liver; approximately 90% of cases of HCC occur in…

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How Do you Approach a Patient with Primary Hyperaldosteronism?

June 28, 2007
How Do you Approach a Patient with Primary Hyperaldosteronism?

An 80 year old male with atrial fibrillation, hypertension, hypokalemia is diagnosed with hyperaldosteronism with an aldosterone to renin ratio of 34.5/0.15=230 . CT scan reveals a right adrenal 1 cm presumed adenoma

Questions:
1. How do you accurately diagnose primary hyperaldosteronism?
2. Do medications which the patient is taking influence the work-up?
3. Can you have primary hyperaldosteronism in the absence of hypokalemia?
4. Can the adrenal mass be incidental? Should the patient have additional testing?

-Anna Dvorak PGY-3

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Meeting Perspectives-ASCO 2007

June 26, 2007
Meeting Perspectives-ASCO 2007

Commentary By: Theresa Ryan, M.D. Assistant Professor, Division of Oncology

During the first five days in June, the American Society of Clinical Oncology met in Chicago for their 43rd annual meeting. The theme of this meeting was “Translating Research into Practice,” emphasizing the society’s goal of enhancing patient care by creating a forum wherein the latest advances in translational and clinical cancer research are presented in the context of our current understanding of cancer biology. Many abstracts presented will lay the groundwork for…

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Meeting Perspectives: Digestive Disease Week (DDW) 2007

June 20, 2007
Meeting Perspectives: Digestive Disease Week (DDW) 2007

Commentary by Milini Sahu, MD Fellow, Division of Gastrotenterology, Gina Sam-DeRiggs, Fellow, Division of Gastroenterology, and Michael Poles MD,  Assistant Professor, NYU Division of Gastroenterology and Associate Editor, Clinical Correlations

Close to 17,000 gastroenterologists attended Digestive Disease Week (DDW) from May 19-24 in Washington DC. While I stayed behind (someone has to help with emergency endoscopies), the majority of NYU’s gastroenterology fellows and attendings were there for a week of learning, presenting, and making NYU proud.  Two of our fellows, Malini…

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Hyperparathyroidism in Chronic Kidney Disease

June 13, 2007
Hyperparathyroidism in Chronic Kidney Disease

Commentary by Sarah Berry MD, PGY-3 and Joseph Weisstuch, MD Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine, Divsion of Nephrology

Case: Mr. K is a 59 year old gentleman with a past medical history of hypertension, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and worsening chronic kidney disease (CKD) over the last six years, despite compliance with his medications and optimized glucose and blood pressure control. His current medication regimen includes metoprolol, hydrochlorothiazide, aspirin, simvastatin, glyburide, and monopril. Mr. K’s most recent lab work indicates that his…

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Clinical Commentary: The Travesty of Grinding Axes with Science: Rosiglitazone and Cardiac Risk

June 12, 2007
Clinical Commentary: The Travesty of Grinding Axes with Science: Rosiglitazone and Cardiac Risk

Welcome to our first blog commentary. One of the purposes of the blog is to generate discussion about issues in health care. This “Clinical Commentary” section is an invitation to our housestaff and faculty to submit their own thoughts and viewpoints on current issues. The views expressed in this section are soley those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of Clinical Correlations.

Commentary by Gregory Mints MD and Nirav Shah MD, MPH

The meta-analysis of Rosiglitazone’s effect on cardiovascular events…

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Can you switch a patient from insulin to oral agents?

June 6, 2007
Can you switch a patient from insulin to oral agents?

  A 48 year old male is diagnosed with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus after presenting to the emergency room with symptoms of hyperglycemia. He was immediately started on insulin and has been very compliant with his regimen. His initial Hemoglobin A1C at the time of diagnosis was 15.  However, over the past few months, due to hypoglycemia, his insulin dosage has been titrated down. He is currently on low doses of NPH and aspart, with an A1C of 6.6. Would it be possible to

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Meeting Perspectives: 2007 American Thoracic Society International Conference

June 5, 2007
Meeting Perspectives: 2007 American Thoracic Society International Conference

Commentary by Doreen Addrizzo-Harris MD, Associate Professor, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

The 2007 American Thoracic Society (ATS) meeting took place between May18-23 in San Francisco, California at the Moscone Conference center.  There were more than 400 sessions, 800 speakers and 5,500 original research abstracts.  The meeting is concentrated in the areas of pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine.

The NYU Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care medicine, under the direction of Dr. William N. Rom, presented more than 30…

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Recent Developments in the Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma

May 31, 2007
Recent Developments in the Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma

Commentary by Michael Seidman MD, Chief Oncology Fellow

New treatment options for both early and advanced Renal Cell Cancer have recently been published. Traditionally, treatment for early stage disease was partial or radical nephrectomy. In the metastatic setting, treatment options were limited to toxic cytokine therapy with IFN or IL-2.

Some recent literature has suggested that small, incidentally found renal tumors can safely be watched without the need for invasive surgery. Remzi et al retrospectively reviewed 287 tumor bearing kidneys 4cm or…

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New Guidelines on the Management of Intracerebral Hemorrhage

May 30, 2007
New Guidelines on the Management of Intracerebral Hemorrhage

Commentary by Dr. Daniel Labovitz, Director of the NYU Stroke Center

After an 8-year hiatus, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association has at last published a fresh set of guidelines on the management of acute spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) . ICH represents between 10 and 20% of all first strokes, depending on the population, but carries a mortality rate of 35% to 50%, with hemorrhage volume, hemorrhage location, intraventricular extension and age all contributing independently to the risk of death.…

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