Radiology

Mystery Quiz

June 19, 2008
Mystery Quiz

Posted by Athena Kritharis MS-3, Vivian Hayashi MD, Instructor of Clinical Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Robert Smith MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

The patient is a 42 year old Caucasian woman with no significant past medical history who presents with diffuse abdominal pain for two months that progressed to acute epigastric pain followed by nausea and vomiting. The vomitus was “milky” and contained only food particles. Symptoms were not relieved with over-the-counter antacids. The patient recalls eating scallops…

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Grand Rounds: “Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis”

June 5, 2008
Grand Rounds: “Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis”

Commentary by Jatin Roper MD, PGY-3

Medical Grand Rounds today was presented last week by Dr. Shawn Cowper, Assistant Professor of Dermatology and Pathology at Yale University School of Medicine. Grand Rounds began with the presentation of a case from Tisch Hospital:

A 46 year old female with a history of end-stage renal disease secondary to diffuse-proliferative glomerulonephritis on hemodialysis, systemic lupus erythematosis, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, and IVC thrombosis presents to a dermatology consultant for progressive hardness, tightness, and tenderness…

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Noninvasive Cardiac Imaging: Coronary CT Angiography

March 26, 2008
Noninvasive Cardiac Imaging: Coronary CT Angiography

Commentary by Matt LaBarbera MD, PGY-3 and Rob Donnino, MD Instructor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology

Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is a noninvasive imaging modality which can be used to evaluate the anatomy of the coronary arteries. Unlike coronary artery calcium scoring, which utilizes noncontrast CT to assess atherosclerotic disease burden, CCTA allows direct visualization of the coronary artery wall and lumen with the administration of intravenous contrast. The degree of coronary luminal stenosis can be reliably estimated, as can the presence or absence…

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Mystery Quiz

January 29, 2008
Mystery Quiz

Posted By: Vivian Hayashi, MD, Instructor of Clinical Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Robert Smith, MD Associate Professor of Medicine, Division Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

A 78 year old man with a history of ankylosing spondylitis and known cardiac disease associated with congestive heart failure, presented with breathlessness one year prior to admission.  Over the most recent months, the patient complained of cough productive of voluminous frothy, watery sputum.  Medications included digoxin, furosemide, irbesartan, isosorbide, metoprolol, spirinolactone, simvastatin, and warfarin.  The patient had worked…

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X Ray Visions Mystery Quiz- The Answer

August 30, 2007
X Ray Visions Mystery Quiz- The Answer

Before you read the answer, you may want to review the initial Mystery Quiz posted last week.

Commentary by Andrew Hardie MD, Fellow, NYU Department of Radiology

Although this patient’s symptoms were not the most typical of this entity, the CT findings in this case are diagnostic of a perforated anterior duodenal ulcer. The most essential observation, and the one that alters management, is the presence of intraabdominal free air (arrows). The small collections of air in this case are not unusual for bowel perforations,…

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X-Ray Visions: Mystery Quiz

August 22, 2007
X-Ray Visions: Mystery Quiz

A 46 year old male with a past medical history of hypertension presents to the emergency room complaining of constant throbbing epigastric pain for one day. He rates the pain as 7/10, with some radiation to his chest. He reports some mild nausea, but denies diarrhea or constipation.  He does endorse a bloated sensation for the past few days. He has not had any fevers and denies melana or hematochezia.  He is an avid biker and reports unlimited exercise tolerance. He denies any previous history of chest pain.

The patient works as…

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X-Ray Visions: Update on Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis and Gadolinium Contrast MRI

July 24, 2007
X-Ray Visions: Update on Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis and Gadolinium Contrast MRI

Commentary by Andrew Hardie MD, Body MRI Fellow, NYU Dept of Radiology

The recent discovery of a link between Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF) and the administration of gadolinium contrast for MRI examinations has sent the imaging world scrambling. NSF is a debilitating fibrosing reaction primarily involving the skin and, to a variable degree, internal organs. While longitudinal studies currently do not exist to help determine which patients can be safely administered gadolinium, it is clear that severe renal dysfunction, including those patients on…

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Breaking News: FDA Advises Caution with Gadolinium Based Contrast

December 27, 2006
Breaking News: FDA Advises Caution with Gadolinium Based Contrast

Commentary By: Minisha Sood PGY-3

The FDA has received reports of 90 patients with moderate to end-stage kidney disease who have undergone MRI or MRA with a gadolinium-based contrast agent and subsequently developed a new disease known as Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF).

Scientists first identified NSF, also known as Nephrogenic Fibrosing Dermopathy (NFD), in 1997 and its cause has not yet been identified.  There have been approximately 200 reports of NSF/NFD only in people with kidney disease.  Neither the duration of kidney disease nor its…

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